Looking for the word

Moderator: JackFrost

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2020-08-29, 6:40

linguoboy wrote:
Woods wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Woods wrote:I don't like the "redundancy" of saying "slightly ajar" that linguoboy mentioned. But I really want the person reading to imagine that the door is very slightly opened - so if we have to use the extra words, maybe I could add "whether it's fully opened or very slightly ajar"?

You asked what sounded good to native speakers. This is what sounds best to me.

Does the very add anything there or is it too much?

Honestly I hadn’t noticed that you’d added it. That should give you an idea how little difference it makes.

Okay, but if you don't mind it, I'm leaving it there :)

User avatar
languagepotato
Posts: 479
Joined: 2013-01-22, 7:17
Gender: male
Country: NL The Netherlands (Nederland)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby languagepotato » 2020-09-03, 8:48

Also looking for a word (if it exists)

Is there a word for someone who doesn't eat land animals, but eats fowl and fish (basically what I'm looking for is a word like pollo-pescetarian but including more fowl than just chicken)?
native: (ar-MA) (nl)
very comfortable: (en-US)
somewhat comfortable: (de) (es) (af)
forgetting: (fr) (ar-arb)
touristy level: (ro) (sv)(ber)(pl)
someday hopefully: (ja) (sq) (cs) (tr) and many others

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24692
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby linguoboy » 2020-09-03, 9:52

languagepotato wrote:Also looking for a word (if it exists)

Is there a word for someone who doesn't eat land animals, but eats fowl and fish (basically what I'm looking for is a word like pollo-pescetarian but including more fowl than just chicken)?

“I don’t eat red meat.”
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2020-09-03, 10:57

linguoboy wrote:
languagepotato wrote:Also looking for a word (if it exists)

Is there a word for someone who doesn't eat land animals, but eats fowl and fish (basically what I'm looking for is a word like pollo-pescetarian but including more fowl than just chicken)?

“I don’t eat red meat.”

What a change of topic! :shock:

What about rabbits?

Linguaphile
Posts: 3377
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-09-03, 13:47

languagepotato wrote:Also looking for a word (if it exists)

Is there a word for someone who doesn't eat land animals, but eats fowl and fish (basically what I'm looking for is a word like pollo-pescetarian but including more fowl than just chicken)?

Actually pollo-pescetarian is often understood exactly that way. Some pollo-pescetarians don't eat any meat besides fish and chicken, but many will eat other poultry. Likewise pollotarian or pollo-vegetarian generally means a person who can eat poultry in general, not exclusively chicken.
A person who says "I don't eat red meat" might eat pork.

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-01-28, 12:05

Turning the volume knob up and down, is there a one-word verb that can be used?

Like there is to tune, but that is slightly different. To adjust, but it will require adding the substantive. To pitch, but that is more about the quality and character of the thing being modified and not about its level and strength (which is what I'm looking for). I need to use it metaphorically with a noun that is not the volume or sound itself, so I was wondering if there's a one-word verb that would express the whole thing - turning volume up and down, or some similar physical phenomenon?

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24692
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby linguoboy » 2021-01-28, 15:47

Woods wrote:Turning the volume knob up and down, is there a one-word verb that can be used?

Like there is to tune, but that is slightly different. To adjust, but it will require adding the substantive.

Not necessarily. In context, it can be used with an understood object. The problem is more that it's too general.

There isn't really a one-word equivalent, but depending on the actual sentence you might be able to utilise "modulate". It's also broader than just volume, but I've heard "modulate your voice" to mean "speak softly", so given the right context I think it might be possible for it to mean "adjust the volume". Like adjust, the object could be understood, e.g. "I still can't hear it." "You have to modulate."

Since this is an extended usage, I'd really have to see the sentence though.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-01-29, 9:05

linguoboy wrote:
Woods wrote:Turning the volume knob up and down, is there a one-word verb that can be used?

Like there is to tune, but that is slightly different. To adjust, but it will require adding the substantive.

Not necessarily. In context, it can be used with an understood object. The problem is more that it's too general.

There isn't really a one-word equivalent, but depending on the actual sentence you might be able to utilise "modulate". It's also broader than just volume, but I've heard "modulate your voice" to mean "speak softly", so given the right context I think it might be possible for it to mean "adjust the volume". Like adjust, the object could be understood, e.g. "I still can't hear it." "You have to modulate."

Since this is an extended usage, I'd really have to see the sentence though.

Could you say that something "modulates one's beliefs" - in the sense of making them weaker or stronger without clarifying which? I came up with "regulate" but it didn't sound good.

Adjust, modify, tune, pitch won't work cause it'll sound more like they're changing the actual belief, while it's more about its strength.

Modulate sounds fine to me, so good that you're here :)

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-04-09, 23:24

Looking for a good and heavy insult, to name porn-producing corporations in a morally-condemning way, from a Christian and generally highly disapproving perspective. However, no soft speak is required, the word can be very rude and unpleasant - the author is not trying to be polite at all but more to emphasise his point, get the attention and strike.

Actually, does anybody have an idea whether it's freedom of speech or something that can be prosecuted if a certain profession (or whatever you want to call that kind of activity - which is nonetheless perfectly legal) is heavily insulted by someone? I guess as long as the actual company or producer is not mentioned but the branch as a whole, it should be all right?

I quickly went through the list below and picked "shitcunts" (without having heard this word before - it sounds like it's matching the attitude the author is trying to convey. However, maybe someone here will come with a much better idea - the text is still trying to maintain a certain level of class.

https://www.insult.wiki/list-of-insults

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24692
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby linguoboy » 2021-04-09, 23:48

Woods wrote:Looking for a good and heavy insult, to name porn-producing corporations in a morally-condemning way, from a Christian and generally highly disapproving perspective. However, no soft speak is required, the word can be very rude and unpleasant - the author is not trying to be polite at all but more to emphasise his point, get the attention and strike.

"Filth merchant"? "Smut pedlar"?

Woods wrote:Actually, does anybody have an idea whether it's freedom of speech or something that can be prosecuted if a certain profession (or whatever you want to call that kind of activity - which is nonetheless perfectly legal) is heavily insulted by someone? I guess as long as the actual company or producer is not mentioned but the branch as a whole, it should be all right?

I don't see that insulting a particular company would be a problem as long as there are no false claims being made. "Cherry Pop Studios uses underaged models" is an actionable statement if the person making it lacks proof; "Cherry Pop Studios is run by vicious perverts who peddle revolting smut that would only appeal to paedophiles" isn't. (I think it would be tough to demonstrate concrete harm from being called a "pervert" when your product is hardcore pornography, but a groundless accusation that your models are underage would cause a loss of business from customers worried about falling afoul of child pornography laws and that would be grounds to sue for damages.)
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-04-10, 10:22

linguoboy wrote:"Filth merchant"?

Well, that's too soft, but I love how you always find a good word!

Is "shitcunt" too bad? Like you read a nice cultured text and in the middle you get struck with that - what would be your reaction?


linguoboy wrote:"Smut pedlar"?

smut: obscene or lascivious talk, writing, or pictures

peddle:
1. Try to sell (something, especially small goods) by going from place to place
2. Sell (an illegal drug or stolen item)
3. Promote (an idea or view) persistently or widely


(Oxford)

Maybe too soft? Or not? I don't have the native ear to hear the underlying feeling. If it's like "filth merchants," it's not enough. I would like to remove the unculturedness of "shitcunt" but keep the aggressivenes and striking effect.


linguoboy wrote:I don't see that insulting a particular company would be a problem (...)

Cherry Pop Studios is run by vicious perverts who peddle revolting smut that would only appeal to paedophiles" isn't [an actionable statement]

Really? I think we should ask a lawyer, but it doesn's seem to me like insulting persons straightforwardly would be all right.

"Mr John Smith is a retarded shithole" - if I was Mr Smith and somebody wrote that about me, I'd feel like I might be entitled to take action against the author.

But if instead of Cherry Pop Studios it was just implied that one is talking about them or the subject was referred to as "the industry and the likes," that seems more okay to me.

Actually, there might be a difference between EU countries and the US. In the US, you can burn flags and insult the state for example. In France, that gets you a 7500 € fine. Without knowing the details, I just checked that insults in public can cost you up to 12 000 €.

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24692
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby linguoboy » 2021-04-10, 12:57

Woods wrote:
linguoboy wrote:"Filth merchant"?

Well, that's too soft, but I love how you always find a good word!

Is "shitcunt" too bad? Like you read a nice cultured text and in the middle you get struck with that - what would be your reaction?

The author is nonnative or is an adolescent trying to be humorously transgressive. It’s completely out of character with a “nice cultured text” from an ordinary speaker.

Maybe too soft? Or not? I don't have the native ear to hear the underlying feeling. If it's like "filth merchants," it's not enough. I would like to remove the unculturedness of "shitcunt" but keep the aggressivenes and striking effect.

Maybe religious folks speak differently in your culture? Here (with very rare exceptions) they strongly condemn profanity. So as soon as you introduce a word like “shit” or “cunt” you lose the effect of coming from a “Christian and highly disapproving perspective”.

Really? I think we should ask a lawyer, but it doesn's seem to me like insulting persons straightforwardly would be all right.

"Mr John Smith is a retarded shithole" - if I was Mr Smith and somebody wrote that about me, I'd feel like I might be entitled to take action against the author.

Feeling like you have a right to do something and having that right are two different things. People sue other people all the time but they need to come up with some kind of legal justification—some concrete harm that was done to them.

If someone calls you a “retarded shithole” on the street, there’s really nothing you can do. If they call you a “retarded shithole” at work—and you can prove that this part of a larger pattern of abuse and belittlement—they can be prosecuted for creating a “hostile work environment” and you can demand restitution (in the form of lost wages or compensation for “emotional damages”—plus they could be on the hook for “punitive damages” if the court thinks that only a large fine will make them change how they run their business).

Actually, there might be a difference between EU countries and the US. In the US, you can burn flags and insult the state for example. In France, that gets you a 7500 € fine. Without knowing the details, I just checked that insults in public can cost you up to 12 000 €.

Under what conditions though? French people insult each other in public all the time and I’ve never heard of one of them having to pay a fine for it—let alone to the tune of 12,000€.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-04-11, 15:59

linguoboy wrote:
Woods wrote:Is "shitcunt" too bad? Like you read a nice cultured text and in the middle you get struck with that - what would be your reaction?

The author is nonnative or is an adolescent trying to be humorously transgressive. It’s completely out of character with a “nice cultured text” from an ordinary speaker.

Okay, then I definitely need another word!


linguoboy wrote:Maybe religious folks speak differently in your culture? Here (with very rare exceptions) they strongly condemn profanity. So as soon as you introduce a word like “shit” or “cunt” you lose the effect of coming from a “Christian and highly disapproving perspective”.

No, no - the text is not religious. I just meant that the author hates porn as much as religious people do and has the same attitude. But he's a lot more aggressive and straightforward than they are, and not religious at all. He doesn't mind profanity if it helps him express himself, but he prefers not to. (The word "cunt" isn't used anywhere else in the text but the word "shit" occurs here and there).


linguoboy wrote:"smut peddlars"

How bad is this "smut"? Maybe we just replace that word with something stronger?


linguoboy wrote:People sue other people all the time but they need to come up with some kind of legal justification—some concrete harm that was done to them.

If someone calls you a “retarded shithole” on the street, there’s really nothing you can do. If they call you a “retarded shithole” at work—and you can prove that this part of a larger pattern of abuse and belittlement—they can be prosecuted for creating a “hostile work environment” and you can demand restitution (in the form of lost wages or compensation for “emotional damages”—plus they could be on the hook for “punitive damages” if the court thinks that only a large fine will make them change how they run their business).

What if they say "our traffic went down because of a bunch of almost-religious fanatics who insulted us before our audience"?

Btw, you said "on the street." I'd go for "in the street." Is "on" American standard? I think I might have used it earlier, but as with many other things, replaced later on.


linguoboy wrote:
Woods wrote:Actually, there might be a difference between EU countries and the US. In the US, you can burn flags and insult the state for example. In France, that gets you a 7500 € fine. Without knowing the details, I just checked that insults in public can cost you up to 12 000 €.

Under what conditions though? French people insult each other in public all the time and I’ve never heard of one of them having to pay a fine for it—let alone to the tune of 12,000€.

No clue. Just checked the general information under "peines encourues / injure publique" (incurred penalties / insult in public) in the link below:

https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F32077

But the thing with 7 500 € for burning the French flag in public is completely outrageous to me. That should be freedom of speech.

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24692
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby linguoboy » 2021-04-12, 14:37

Woods wrote:
linguoboy wrote:Maybe religious folks speak differently in your culture? Here (with very rare exceptions) they strongly condemn profanity. So as soon as you introduce a word like “shit” or “cunt” you lose the effect of coming from a “Christian and highly disapproving perspective”.

No, no - the text is not religious. I just meant that the author hates porn as much as religious people do and has the same attitude. But he's a lot more aggressive and straightforward than they are, and not religious at all.

Then why did you say "from a Christian...perspective"? Why mention religion at all when it ultimately is irrelevant?

(I'm also not sure what you mean by "has the same attitude". "Porn is bad and should be banned"? Because you can't get more specific than this and not get into the religious aspects of Christian moral condemnation of porn.)

Woods wrote:He doesn't mind profanity if it helps him express himself, but he prefers not to. (The word "cunt" isn't used anywhere else in the text but the word "shit" occurs here and there).

"Shit" is a milder expletive than "cunt" in English, which is generally ranked among the worst (particularly when applied to a woman).

Woods wrote:
linguoboy wrote:"smut peddlars"

How bad is this "smut"? Maybe we just replace that word with something stronger?

"Smut" isn't obscene at all. However, the sound of it is reminiscent of other "four-letter words" like "fuck" and "cunt" so there's a certain impact to it. If I wanted to make this term stronger, I don't think I'd replace it, just add a modifier like "motherfucking smut peddlars".

Woods wrote:
linguoboy wrote:People sue other people all the time but they need to come up with some kind of legal justification—some concrete harm that was done to them.

If someone calls you a “retarded shithole” on the street, there’s really nothing you can do. If they call you a “retarded shithole” at work—and you can prove that this part of a larger pattern of abuse and belittlement—they can be prosecuted for creating a “hostile work environment” and you can demand restitution (in the form of lost wages or compensation for “emotional damages”—plus they could be on the hook for “punitive damages” if the court thinks that only a large fine will make them change how they run their business).

What if they say "our traffic went down because of a bunch of almost-religious fanatics who insulted us before our audience"?

How do you prove the connexion between being insulted and the decrease in traffic? Those two things could be entirely unrelated. Or the insult could only have served the purpose of drawing attention to undisputed characteristics of your business, and it could be that realisation on the part of the consumers which caused them to stay away.

Woods wrote:Btw, you said "on the street." I'd go for "in the street." Is "on" American standard? I think I might have used it earlier, but as with many other things, replaced later on.

IMD, "in the street" means physically in the roadway whereas "on the street" generally means on the paved area adjacent.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-04-15, 20:53

linguoboy wrote:
Woods wrote:
linguoboy wrote:Maybe religious folks speak differently in your culture? Here (with very rare exceptions) they strongly condemn profanity. So as soon as you introduce a word like “shit” or “cunt” you lose the effect of coming from a “Christian and highly disapproving perspective”.

No, no - the text is not religious. I just meant that the author hates porn as much as religious people do and has the same attitude. But he's a lot more aggressive and straightforward than they are, and not religious at all.

Then why did you say "from a Christian...perspective"? Why mention religion at all when it ultimately is irrelevant?

Well, the idea is that the Christian moral condemnation is present, but the author is not Christian, so even though he aligns with Christians on that topic, he doesn't mind swearing.

I'll take smut pedlars then - you're saying that it's as strong as shitcunts but sounds good?

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24692
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby linguoboy » 2021-04-15, 23:26

Woods wrote:I'll take smut pedlars then - you're saying that it's as strong as shitcunts but sounds good?

Linguoboy wrote:If I wanted to make this term stronger, I don't think I'd replace it, just add a modifier like "motherfucking smut peddlars".
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-04-16, 10:29

Linguoboy wrote:If I wanted to make this term stronger, I don't think I'd replace it, just add a modifier like "motherfucking smut peddlars".

Yeah, but I don't like "motherfucking." Sounds somewhat weak to me - like the person insulting is getting angry while saying it, while just naming them something without the adjective is more laid back - isn't it so?

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 24692
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby linguoboy » 2021-04-16, 16:29

Woods wrote:
Linguoboy wrote:If I wanted to make this term stronger, I don't think I'd replace it, just add a modifier like "motherfucking smut peddlars".

Yeah, but I don't like "motherfucking." Sounds somewhat weak to me - like the person insulting is getting angry while saying it, while just naming them something without the adjective is more laid back - isn't it so?

So you're saying that "smut-peddling motherfuckers" sounds more "laid-back" to you than "motherfucking smut-peddlers"?
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-04-17, 10:06

linguoboy wrote:So you're saying that "smut-peddling motherfuckers" sounds more "laid-back" to you than "motherfucking smut-peddlers"?

I don't know - I've never been particularly fond of the word "motherfucker" as an insult - it just sounds too shallow and unexpressive to me, never been my thang :D

Actually, I've only used it positively - to refer to someone I like jokingly.

And is "smut-peddling motherfuckers" any stronger than "smut peddlars" alone?

User avatar
Woods
Posts: 588
Joined: 2007-11-14, 12:43
Gender: male
Country: FI Finland (Suomi)

Re: Looking for the word

Postby Woods » 2021-05-02, 10:37

The wrinkle between the nose and the mouth

How could you call the line that circles around the area between the nose and the chin?

The one that you can see as some sort of wrinkle on the picture below, which starts from the left nostril (i.e. right on the picture) and goes further left - or for most people down beside the mouth?

Or if that is a wrinkle, is there a term for the area between the nose and the chin?

Image


And one more:

man-in-law

I wanted to use it for somebody's husband that she's been married with for 20 years without having the feelings for it. Would that pass, or is the expression already taken?

https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=man-in-law

I guess it might not work because these "-in-law" words are about people relating to one's partner. But I want to say it in a way that means he should be a husband in all ways but is only on paper. Without using the word "husband" because then comes "marriage" and the sentence is too obvious and boring, plus it lacks that extra meaning.


Third one - beauty when talking about a man's physical appearance? If a woman is beautiful and a man is handsome, can it be talked about his beauty or should it rather be his handsomeness?


Return to “English”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest