DOs and DON'Ts in your countries

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Psi-Lord
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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-01-24, 2:23

Hmm, though I can't say I go out on any regular basis, I must say I do enjoy dancing when going out with my friends. :) But I guess it's got a bit to do with them being both boys and girls—if I went out with male friends only though I would probably spend the night just drinking with them, unless I found a girl to dance with. ;) It might look a bit "strange" (in a way) to see a group of guys dancing together, with no girls around (unless it's a gay place, needless to say :lol:).
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anne2

Postby anne2 » 2003-01-24, 7:58

In Thailand we are taught not to :-

- Use feet picking up things or step on pillow. (the latter is more serious)
- Point people with our thumb.
- Touch others' head
- Give a handkerchief or a knife/cutter as a gift
- Guys don't touch girls (don't worry guys, there are some exceptions)
- Sing while eating
- Keep shoes on at home
- Dance on the street
- Walk and eat at the same time
- Call others by family name
- Call older people by name. (Always use name with title before it, or only title)
- Accept a meal from your host. (but you can do if the host insists)
- Give money as a gift (except for ầnh-pao)

the_real_onion

Postby the_real_onion » 2003-01-24, 8:23

I do wonder if Belgians are considered "northerners" or "southerners"...

MEETING:
-We usually meet friends at neutral places too, it's very common to take people out to eat or go for a drink
-when we do invite people at home (coming uninvited is for VERY close friends), we usually stuff them with food (snacks, cookies, a full meal...) and coffee too (or any other drink), not just one cookie (and yes, many jokes about dutchmen and their one cookie rule exist, as i am sure they have jokes about belgians)

KISSING
-most Belgians enjoy kissing, one to greet someone (girl/girl or boy/girl, men usually greet eachother by shaking hands, although a kiss on the cheek is not uncommon)
-when congratulating someone (b-day, graduation...) or at new years, or for a long goodbye, we kiss 3 times (alternating on cheeks)

DANCING
-most men don't dance unless there are girls around...and even then, i'm afraid drinking is more popular than dancing for most guys (but with enough alcohol, any man will dance :oops:
-when girls dance with boys, it's probably wise not to take it for granted that she wants more than just dancing...but i suppose that goes for most places in the world?

EATING
-if there's one thing Belgians are good at, it's food. We love preparing it and eating it and giving lots of it to visitors (same goes for beer)
-chicken (or other fowl) and lobster are things you should eat with your fingers, and as long as you don't make a mess or behave too embarrassingly, i don't think most people care all that much about your table manners, IMPORTANT is that you *enjoy* the food (say it's yummie, have some more, compliment the cook, say you'd have more if you weren't so full)
-most belgians take time to eat...business lunches take at least an hour (to eat and have desert and only then comes business) and most people don't like getting up and leaving right after the last bite

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Postby NulNuk » 2003-01-24, 9:29

just to make it clear ,I did not meant that every time a gul try to dance
with a boy he expect sex (he probably do though :0{ ) ,but if the gul put her
hands arround a boy ,she should not expect hem to keep hands in hes pokets !!!
of course it is understood that if she poot her hands arround hem ,he will put hes hands arround her !!!
and spesially if you go dance with some one you dont know ,if she dance
with some one she knows ,its diferent ,but dancing with a strenger is teasing!!!
and a gul should not do that if she does not like hem,because than it means
she was just loughing at the boy !!! ,or is she a slot :0{ .
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Postby Saaropean » 2003-01-24, 9:38

Weldal wrote:As for being stupid, we can also think that those typical German green and white clothes and green hat are rather stupid too... :lol:

You mean those leather pants and hats with a feather or so? That's Bavarian, not German. :wink: And you're right, it does look very stupid. No sane person outside Bavaria would wear that, and definitely no one under the age of 50, unless it's for some kind of folklore festival. :lol: :lol:

Ron wrote:I won't talk in formal, against a guy of 25 years old

I do if that guy works in a shop, and I'm a client. Shop assistants and clients address each other in formal language, no matter how old they are. Except of course if it's some kind of trendy shop with a familiar atmosphere and only young clients (like university students)...

Ron wrote:Yeah, the youngers want to eat like monkies and eat burgers at the MC Donalds with there hands...

Do you eat burgers with knife and fork?!? :shock:

Ron wrote:You do? So when you're out you say, "Leuten, ich gehen zu das toilet" ?
I won't do that, they don't have to know what you're doing there

When I'm among friends or relatives, I don't have a problem saying Ich geh' mal kurz auf's Klo... :)

Ron wrote:
Luis wrote:After all this, Ron and Saaropean, how come you don't want us to label you as 'cold, unfriendly and rude', hehehe :P

Yes, where cold, or at least colder than South-Europeans, we're absolutely not rude. Because we respect and accept each other. Unfriendly we're also not. I'm very friendly, but there rules and when somebody don't follow those rules, I have to be unfriendly.

That's the kind of cultural difference that can lead to serious misunderstandings... :roll:
By the way: I am aware that hospitality in "northern countries" is very limited compared to "the south". :(

Psi-Lord wrote:if I went out with male friends only though I would probably spend the night just drinking with them, unless I found a girl to dance with. :wink: It might look a bit "strange" (in a way) to see a group of guys dancing together, with no girls around (unless it's a gay place, needless to say :lol:).

On the dancefloor, there were us four Germans (three guys and one girl) and a bunch of other guys and girls, I think mainly Australians, a few Latin American girls and another German guy.
Two of the three Brazilian guys with us were our age (early 20s), the third one was one of the young Brazilians' uncle.

Anne wrote:In Thailand we are taught not to :-

- Use feet picking up things or step on pillow. (the latter is more serious)
- Point people with our thumb.
- Touch others' head
- Give a handkerchief or a knife/cutter as a gift
- Guys don't touch girls (don't worry guys, there are some exceptions)
- Sing while eating
- Keep shoes on at home
- Dance on the street
- Walk and eat at the same time
- Call others by family name
- Call older people by name. (Always use name with title before it, or only title)
- Accept a meal from your host. (but you can do if the host insists)
- Give money as a gift (except for â?nh-pao)

Some remarks about that from a Central European:
- It seems unnatural to me to pick things up with the feet. :)
- No one points to people with the thumb. Either you use the forefinger (which is rude) or the head or (which is more polite) you don't point to other people at all. :wink:
- Elder people like touching a child's head to say "You're so cute!"...
- A handkerchief as a gift? Sounds worse than socks. :lol: A knife? Maybe a good one as a wedding gift...
- Guys don't touch girls? No problem if the guy is her boy-friend. Otherwise that's sexual harrassment, which is a big no-no.
- Sing while eating? Sounds like Oktoberfest beer tent or Hofbräuhaus atmosphere... :lol:
- Keep shoes on at home? No problem here if the shoes are not dirty.
- Dance on the street? Only on special occasions... :wink:
- Walk and eat at the same time? Fast food is a part of modern life, isn't it?
- Call others by family name? Wait a moment, you don't mean that, do you? It's rude to people by their first name or even a nickname, unless they are friends or relatives. :shock:
- A title for older people? I even say "Herr/Frau X" instead of "Professor X" when talking to a professor...
- Accept a meal from your host? Now this is strange... :?
- Give money as a gift? Many people do so, because they don't know what else to give. And many people want nothing but money, because they knew the others won't give them anything useful...

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As I thought...

Postby Weldal » 2003-01-24, 10:19

Saaropean wrote:Two of the three Brazilian guys with us were our age (early 20s), the third one was one of the young Brazilians' uncle.

So, as I thought, regardless of their age, they behaved exactly in the same way and exactly like I would do in their case... :wink:
As Psi-Lord emphasized, if girls are present and a guy is interested in one of them, then his behavior is very different. In this case he will dance anything: walz, tango, samba, rock and roll, classic ballet or even Bavarian folkloric music with those incredible clothes... :lol:
Going back to bad habits in Brazil regarding eating: never eat and talk at the same time, it's very impolite here. You finish chewing then you talk to the other person, when you finish talking you eat again. If this person ask you something while you are chewing everybody supposes that he will wait your answer until you finish chewing...

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Try the other channel...

Postby Weldal » 2003-01-24, 10:41

And whenever I turn on my TV at 3am on Carnival Day, I can see semi-naked women and men (and some women who were once men) walking around the place singing and dancing Maybe I'm watching the wrong channel

Well, I think that most, if not all, of these semi-naked men are gays, but even most gays don't behave like that, most of these semi-naked ones are models or work in the TV, something like this... In the carneval straight guys wear fantasy clothes, even women's clothes (in carneval it is allowed...), but not semi-naked. It´s a kind of almost general rule to think that a woman's body is what most people want to see, not a man's one...
Probably you are watching the wrong channel, try the one which broadcast the "parades" (desfiles) of the samba clubs. Then you will see only dance and semi-naked women... :wink:

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Postby ekalin » 2003-01-24, 11:07

Luis wrote:
Weldal wrote:Yes, you are right, Ekalin, I forgot Bahia: those guys seem that they never get tired of carneval...
Probably they are the jovial Brazilian ones that Luis mentioned...


Well, Expug is from Bahia. He doesn't seem jovial at all :-D


A thing to remember: the carnival in Bahia is not really for the people of Bahia. It is made for the people of other states and countries, mainly. In the "official" carnival I'd say there's a great number of local people there, but this number is certainly smaller in the "extra" carnivals that happen during other parts of the year. Not that they are not allowed to go, but they supposedly have other things to do[0].

[0]like preparing the next off-season carnival. :-)

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Postby Patricia » 2003-01-24, 11:52

Argentina, a country of nice and friendly people:wink::

Visiting people:

It's pretty common here to "drop by" at friends' or realtives' places. Me and my friends do it all the time. And most people do it as well. There's scheduled visits, of course, especially when you're a busy person and you need to plan even your short free time. When you go visit someone, it's not uncommon that you stay there for hours and hours: tea moves on to dinner, or lunch moves on to tea...everything is very spontaneous.

Dancing:

Boys dance with girls, girls dance with girls, boys dance with boys (in a circle, usually), you dance on your own. Everything is allowed as long as you're having fun.

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Buenos Aires and other cities...

Postby Weldal » 2003-01-24, 14:56

Patricia wrote:Argentina, a country of nice and friendly people:wink::

Which Argentines do you refer to ? From Buenos Aires or from the other cities ?
Because once I heard that there is a clear difference between the behavior of the people from Buenos Aires and the one of people from the other cities and that the image that other nationals have about Argentines is the one of the people from Buenos Aires...
Do you agree ? Being yourself born in another city, but living nowadays in Buenos Aires, perhaps you are the best person to answer this question...
Here in Brazil, for instance, there is big differences regarding different states, even close cities like Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo have different styles of life, even more regions placed far away from each other like northeastern Bahia and the South, for instance...
And I am almost sure that the image that Argentines and Uruguayans have about Brazilian people is exactly the one of the South states, closer to theses countries, while people from Europe and USA regard Brazilians as only the ones from Rio de Janeiro and maybe Bahia, because of tourism and carneval... :wink:

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Re: Buenos Aires and other cities...

Postby Patricia » 2003-01-24, 16:39

Weldal wrote:
Patricia wrote:Argentina, a country of nice and friendly people:wink::

Which Argentines do you refer to ? From Buenos Aires or from the other cities ?
Because once I heard that there is a clear difference between the behavior of the people from Buenos Aires and the one of people from the other cities and that the image that other nationals have about Argentines is the one of the people from Buenos Aires...
Do you agree ? Being yourself born in another city, but living nowadays in Buenos Aires, perhaps you are the best person to answer this question...
Here in Brazil, for instance, there is big differences regarding different states, even close cities like Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo have different styles of life, even more regions placed far away from each other like northeastern Bahia and the South, for instance...
And I am almost sure that the image that Argentines and Uruguayans have about Brazilian people is exactly the one of the South states, closer to theses countries, while people from Europe and USA regard Brazilians as only the ones from Rio de Janeiro and maybe Bahia, because of tourism and carneval... :wink:


First of all, a small technicality: I was indeed born in Buenos Aires, but I grew up in a smaller town in the Patagonia, which I like to call my home town cuz that's how I feel it is.
There are indeed differences between the "porteños" (People from Buenos Aires) and the "gente del interior" (How the porteños usually talk about people who aren't from Buenos Aires). In smaller towns, life usually goes on at a slower pace, more relaxed. In Buenos Aires everything is a rush.
The usual pre-conception states that people from Buenos Aires are vain and proud, and regard people from other places as slow and stupid...This is usually true on the side of the porteños, I saw it myself when I came back to live here in Buenos Aires.
But in general terms, regarding the topics we were discussing in this thread, about visiting and stuff, I think it's more or less the same all over the country.... :). Most foreigners regard Argentinians as friendly, at least.
As for Brazilians, all the people I've met there have been really nice to me, friendly and warm and made me feel at home and were interesting about Argentinian stuff as well. :D

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Yes, Argentina is very important...

Postby Weldal » 2003-01-24, 17:02

Patricia wrote:As for Brazilians, all the people I've met there have been really nice to me, friendly and warm and made me feel at home and were interesting about Argentinian stuff as well.

Yes, in fact we, Brazilians, are always very interested in what happens in Argentina, since the relations, from a very wide point of view, are very important to us too. Venezuela and Colombia are other important countries for us too...
I wish that the USA had the same interest about Argentina, since Argentina doesn't have the same amount of petroleum as Venezuela, neither the drug deal problem of Colombia...

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Postby NulNuk » 2003-01-24, 17:17

Barilochenses are the best Argentinians !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
we are smarter ,funier ,friendier look better and just the best in all :0P
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Postby ekalin » 2003-01-24, 17:36

NulNuk wrote:Barilochenses are the best Argentinians !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
we are smarter ,funier ,friendier look better and just the best in all :0P


And also the most modest ones... ;-)

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-01-24, 17:40

Saaropean wrote:Do you eat burgers with knife and fork?!? :shock:

Well, in Brazil we usually eat pizza with knife and fork, which doesn't seem to be common in other countries—though I might be wrong.
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Postby ekalin » 2003-01-24, 17:47

Psi-Lord wrote:Well, in Brazil we usually eat pizza with knife and fork, which doesn't seem to be common in other countries—though I might be wrong.


In Italy it is eaten with knife and fork, so this must be the correct way of eating a pizza. :-)

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Postby NulNuk » 2003-01-24, 18:40

upe ,Barilochenses are very modest :0P

and the right way to eat Pizza is with NulNuk mouth :0P
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Postby Car » 2003-01-24, 19:44

Psi-Lord wrote:Well, in Brazil we usually eat pizza with knife and fork, which doesn't seem to be common in other countries—though I might be wrong.


Well, in Germany, we usually eat pizza with knife and fork, too.

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2003-01-25, 2:44

Hmmm, I'll start blaming an American pen friend then, who was shocked when I told him that—he said he was sure we were probably the only "weird" people to do that. :P Since that's something I'd never given any deeper thoughts, this was a great oportunity to check it anyway. :)
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Postby ekalin » 2003-01-25, 10:21

Psi-Lord wrote:Hmmm, I'll start blaming an American pen friend then, who was shocked when I told him that—he said he was sure we were probably the only "weird" people to do that.


Tell'im that weird is eating pizza with ketchup (eeeeeeeeeeeekkk) :shock: :twisted:


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