Random Culture Thread

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md0
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby md0 » 2016-12-11, 8:57

and how it refers to Tibet and Palestine as independent nations.

Someone with better hearing than me correct me, but it also refers to Crete (the south-most island of Greece) as an independent country. It was an independent state for about as much time as California, of course.
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby mōdgethanc » 2016-12-11, 10:34

You're right, it does (for some reason in the last verse instead of the verse about Europe). It also mentions a bunch of other non-existent countries: San Juan (the capital of Puerto Rico), "French Guyana" (for Guyana; there is a country called French Guinea but they just call it Guinea), Borneo and Sumatra (both part of Indonesia), "Dahomey" (now Benin), "Mahore" (a native name for Mayotte, which is a territory of France), Abu Dhabi (a city in the UAE), and refers to Scotland and Transylvania as independent. What a clusterfuck.

It's also funny how much the world has changed since I was born: since then the USSR has collapsed, Yemen has been reunited, Czechoslovakia has split in two, Eritrea and South Sudan have declared independence, and Yugoslavia has split into approximately 345892357 independent states. Oh, and Russia annexed Crimea because they just fucking felt like it.

Footnote: I just found out that some stodgy old British toffs still spell it "Sebastopol" like it's the fucking 1st century BC and pronounce it /sɪˈbæstəpəl/. There truly is no god.

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-12-11, 13:24

mōdgethanc wrote:Wait, you would say "burned"?

Yes.
"turnt".

:rotfl:
That just reminded me that there was a song from Animaniacs that I remembered as being a parody of "Macarena" which I thought was about Macedonia. I tried to look it up and apparently it was actually about macadeamia nuts. Weird.

IIRC, the main characters are big fans of macadamia nuts.
Also, everyone seems to remember the nations of the world song and loves it for some reason, and I just think it's hilarious because of how outdated the map is (and I think it may have been outdated even when it was made) and how it refers to Tibet and Palestine as independent nations. I'm sure it was banned in China.

They also had a song about American states that one of my music teachers went over in middle school. IIRC, this particular teacher turned out to be a child molester, to everyone's surprise. IME my music teachers were some of the least troublesome teachers I have ever had.
You think four hours isn't enough time to be hungry enough to eat again?

For most people, it may well be. For me, if I eat one of those things I listed, it isn't.
I would have to eat a huge meal to not be hungry by lunchtime.

Yeah, but you ride your bike to college or something, right? I just drive to work.
Most mornings during this semester I woke up at 8, got to the lab at 9, then finished at 12, and I rarely ate breakfast. By 12 I was usually starving and couldn't wait to eat something (eating in a lab, even if you're just waiting around for half an hour for something to happen, is a capital offence).

Well, I'm certainly hungry by 12 (if I don't eat breakfast). I don't know whether I'd say "starving." I'm pretty indifferent to being hungry, sleepy, etc. (and to having allergies, because that is every day in my life).
Oh, and you would have time to eat breakfast if it didn't take you three goddamn hours to eat a single meal. :wink:

:lol: Well, in this case, it isn't that I don't have time for breakfast! ;)
...so you eat dosas, right?

Yeah. :P
Next time your parents go to the grocery store, ask for kaiser rolls. They're cheap and are great for sandwiches!

Who needs sandwiches when you have fish biryani, fried sardines, rice, stir-fried elephant yams (these probably taste way better than they sound. My parents are amazing cooks, especially my dad), stir-fried green bananas, cabbage, chicken curry, roasted pork, okra, buttermilk, and all the ingredients for DIY breakfast tacos all sitting around in the fridge?
Last edited by vijayjohn on 2016-12-17, 3:55, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby mōdgethanc » 2016-12-11, 17:40

vijayjohn wrote:IIRC, this particular teacher turned out to be a child molester, to everyone's surprise.
Maybe he got brain cancer.
IME my music teachers were some of the least troublesome teachers I have ever had.
Really? What about the woman that was on your thesis committee? She must be up there as well.
Yeah, but you ride your bike to college or something, right? I just drive to work.
In the winter? In Canada? I don't think so. I take the bus. I only ride my bike in the summer.
Well, I'm certainly hungry by 12 (if I don't eat breakfast). I don't know whether I'd say "starving." I'm pretty indifferent to being hungry, sleepy, etc. (and to having allergies, because that is every day in my life).
You must be some kind of genetically engineered superman. My whole life is being hungry and tired. (But on the plus side, no allergies!)
:lol: Well, in this case, it isn't that I don't have time for breakfast! ;)
Seriously though you take an absurd amount of time to eat. I don't know how that's even possible
Who needs sandwiches when you have fish biryani
Fish?? Gross. I'd rather have some kind of meat.
fried sardines
Would be good on a sandwich.
rice
Pretty boring on its own.
stir-fried elephant yams
What the hell is that.
stir-fried green bananas
Again.
cabbage
Good on a sandwich.
chicken curry
Good with bread.
roasted pork
Great on a sandwich.
okra, buttermilk
I'm from up north, we don't eat that shit here.
and all the ingredients for DIY breakfast tacos all sitting around in the fridge?
Or a breakfast sandwich.

Seriously, the answer to that question is: if you want to have a sandwich and you want to make it on a bread roll, because most kinds of sandwich bread are terrible.

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-12-12, 1:33

mōdgethanc wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:IIRC, this particular teacher turned out to be a child molester, to everyone's surprise.
Maybe he got brain cancer.

Who knows. As I meant to say, he seemed like a nice enough guy. He just taught us some songs (but rarely made us memorize them) and how to play a recorder.
IME my music teachers were some of the least troublesome teachers I have ever had.
Really? What about the woman that was on your thesis committee? She must be up there as well.

I said least troublesome! :lol:
In the winter? In Canada? I don't think so. I take the bus. I only ride my bike in the summer.

Oh. Right. Y'all have this little thing called "snow." I forgot about that. :oops: Lol.
You must be some kind of genetically engineered superman.

Or a camel, as my dad used to put it. I probably just don't exercise. :para:
Who needs sandwiches when you have fish biryani
Fish?? Gross. I'd rather have some kind of meat.

By default, if we have biryani, it's chicken biryani. Fish biryani is this dish we got out of this book one of my parents got from India a few years ago (probably after I joined UniLang and possibly the same year) about Malayalee Muslim cuisine from northern Kerala (where most Malayalee Muslims live). My mom apparently likes it more than chicken biryani but only makes it every now and then (this time, I think she intended to give it to my cousins who were supposed to come over for dinner but ended up coming only around midnight, which is about two or three hours past my parents' normal bedtime).
fried sardines
Would be good on a sandwich.

Not really. These are pretty big sardines. Also, sardines are bony. And they're fish, which I thought you didn't like! :P
rice
Pretty boring on its own.

To me, on its own, it's like water. As you might've guessed, I usually have it with buttermilk, some kind of vegetable, and some kind of meat or fish.
stir-fried elephant yams
What the hell is that.
stir-fried green bananas
Again.

They're both really good, I swear! They're sort of like fries that aren't deep-fried but are still crispy.
cabbage
Good on a sandwich.

Even if it's half steamed and half stir-fried with coconut?
chicken curry
Good with bread.

Well yeah.
Seriously, the answer to that question is: if you want to have a sandwich and you want to make it on a bread roll, because most kinds of sandwich bread are terrible.

If I have bread that I think tastes good, I don't bother making a sandwich out of it. I just eat it on its own! :) I like pairing things that taste shitty on their own with more flavorful things. :P

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby mōdgethanc » 2016-12-12, 2:33

vijayjohn wrote:Oh. Right. Y'all have this little thing called "snow." I forgot about that. :oops: Lol.
And something called wind chill. Arguably much worse.
Or a camel, as my dad used to put it. I probably just don't exercise. :para:
I don't exercise a whole lot, other than walking. I guess I just have a high metabolic rate.
By default, if we have biryani, it's chicken biryani. Fish biryani is this dish we got out of this book one of my parents got from India a few years ago (probably after I joined UniLang and possibly the same year) about Malayalee Muslim cuisine from northern Kerala (where most Malayalee Muslims live). My mom apparently likes it more than chicken biryani but only makes it every now and then (this time, I think she intended to give it to my cousins who were supposed to come over for dinner but ended up coming only around midnight, which is about two or three hours past my parents' normal bedtime).
Are your parents like 70? Or do they work super early in the morning?
Not really. These are pretty big sardines. Also, sardines are bony.
Okay, probably not. But I have seen sardines on a sandwich before, so it can be done.
And they're fish, which I thought you didn't like! :P
No, I love fish. I just don't like fish biryani. What a weird concept. Biryani to me has meat and/or vegetables.
To me, on its own, it's like water. As you might've guessed, I usually have it with buttermilk, some kind of vegetable, and some kind of meat or fish.
What is the buttermilk for? Do you cook it with buttermilk, or drink it? I don't think I've ever even had buttermilk.
They're both really good, I swear! They're sort of like fries that aren't deep-fried but are still crispy.
The banana one does look good, once I got past the bizarreness of banana in curry. Also, how much I hate the texture and flavour of raw green bananas.
Even if it's half steamed and half stir-fried with coconut?
Cabbage and coconut??? What planet is this? Can you tell I'm white yet?
If I have bread that I think tastes good, I don't bother making a sandwich out of it. I just eat it on its own! :) I like pairing things that taste shitty on their own with more flavorful things. :P
Well, for kaiser rolls, I don't exactly like the taste so much as the texture. They're good on their own though. I used to eat them with a glass of milk to drink (real milk, not buttermilk. Wtf is this, Little House on the Prairie?).

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-12-12, 5:57

mōdgethanc wrote:And something called wind chill. Arguably much worse.

Oh, we have this, too! (I think).
I don't exercise a whole lot, other than walking.

Walking is good! That's more than I do. At my job, it's even worse because I often have to just sit there for hours on end. I can't even go to the bathroom.
I guess I just have a high metabolic rate.

It's funny to me that you said this because that's what people say about me, too, because I can eat a lot in one sitting. (This is the other part of the reason why my dad used to call me a camel :P).
Are your parents like 70? Or do they work super early in the morning?

They're in their early 60s. Most people in India were farmers, and that's been pretty slow to change. I think it's fair to say both of them came from an agricultural environment, which meant they'd have to get up really early and go to sleep really early. (In households with servants, the servants often have to get up even earlier).
But I have seen sardines on a sandwich before, so it can be done.

Yes, of course! I think people usually do this with canned or bottled sardines. :)
No, I love fish. I just don't like fish biryani. What a weird concept. Biryani to me has meat and/or vegetables.

You won't know if you don't try! :D (attempts to offer mōdgethanc a spoonful before mōdgethanc retroflexes in response)
What is the buttermilk for? Do you cook it with buttermilk, or drink it? I don't think I've ever even had buttermilk.

Well, okay, it's technically not really buttermilk. When I say "buttermilk" in English, what I really mean is this thing we call [kaːt͡ʃɯˈmoːɾɯ] in Malayalam. It's supposed to be made with buttermilk ([ˈmoːɾɯ] means 'buttermilk' in Malayalam; [kaːt͡ʃɯ] refers to the process of cooking it) and looks like this:
Image
My parents make it with plain yoghurt and water instead of buttermilk. Apparently, the way they make it is (roughly speaking) to mix the yoghurt and the water in a bowl, fry the spices in a pan, add the mixture of yoghurt and water to the pan, and stir it continuously but gently over low heat. This last step is necessary to prevent the buttermilk/yoghurt-water-mixture from separating. As soon as steam appears (apparently after about five minutes), you have to turn off the heat and keep stirring for a few more minutes.

Anyway, yes, you can definitely drink it (and I often drink some with a meal), but what I mainly do is to pour some over rice and then mix the rice with the buttermilk with my right hand (before mixing in whatever kind of vegetable I'm eating with it one small amount at a time).
The banana one does look good, once I got past the bizarreness of banana in curry. Also, how much I hate the texture and flavour of raw green bananas.

Wait, who said anything about bananas in curry? :hmm:

This is basically what the yam I was talking about looks like:
Image
This is what the green banana I was talking about looks like:
Image
Cabbage and coconut??? What planet is this?

Well, in Kerala, coconut trees are literally everywhere, so Malayalees put coconut in all sorts of things. Ironically, my brother is allergic to coconut(!), so whenever he visits, my parents always have to make sure not to put any in anything (but of course, they're very much used to this by now. A lot of Malayalees flat-out refuse to believe that he is allergic. Even my parents have always had their suspicions that he only reacts to things he knows have coconut in them).

Malayalees also put curry leaves in everything that has any kind of vegetables, meat, fish, or just spices, I guess (that's why you can see something green in all three of the pictures in this post). I honestly think this is pretty stupid. Curry leaves go well with some things (like the buttermilk I was talking about), but I don't agree with my family that putting them in everything makes any more sense than putting salt and pepper on everything.
Can you tell I'm white yet?

At least it's better than being brown and just as puzzled! :lol:
Well, for kaiser rolls, I don't exactly like the taste so much as the texture. They're good on their own though. I used to eat them with a glass of milk to drink (real milk, not buttermilk. Wtf is this, Little House on the Prairie?).

I drink milk with sweet things all the time, but I doubt I'd drink it with kaiser rolls. (I do remember hearing of "sopping bread in milk" in the Illustrated Classics version of Robinson Crusoe, though).

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby dEhiN » 2016-12-12, 8:29

vijayjohn wrote:
mōdgethanc wrote:And something called wind chill. Arguably much worse.

Oh, we have this, too! (I think).

I'm not sure if the US shows windchill. I think (if I'm not mistaken) it's specifically a Canadian thing to mark the current temp and then the windchill factor. (Though nowadays, to make it simpler, Canadian weather stations/apps/etc. show the current temp and the "feels like" temp, which is basically the windchill!)

vijayjohn wrote:
mōdgethanc wrote:What is the buttermilk for? Do you cook it with buttermilk, or drink it? I don't think I've ever even had buttermilk.

Well, okay, it's technically not really buttermilk. When I say "buttermilk" in English, what I really mean is this thing we call [kaːt͡ʃɯˈmoːɾɯ] in Malayalam. It's supposed to be made with buttermilk ([ˈmoːɾɯ] means 'buttermilk' in Malayalam; [kaːt͡ʃɯ] refers to the process of cooking it) and looks like this:
http://cdn.mariasmenu.com/wp-content/uploads/kachimoru.jpg
My parents make it with plain yoghurt and water instead of buttermilk. Apparently, the way they make it is (roughly speaking) to mix the yoghurt and the water in a bowl, fry the spices in a pan, add the mixture of yoghurt and water to the pan, and stir it continuously but gently over low heat. This last step is necessary to prevent the buttermilk/yoghurt-water-mixture from separating. As soon as steam appears (apparently after about five minutes), you have to turn off the heat and keep stirring for a few more minutes.

OMG! Don't ever drink or try real buttermilk!!! I tried a little one time on its own and it's DISGUSTING!!!! (Note the all-caps and exclamation marks :D.) There are some recipes that call for it - I believe in baking. It's very sour, and not at all like either the taste nor consistency of milk nor liquid butter. Vijay, your parents basically make a watered-down yoghurt prep, which of course would be tasty even with plain rice. It's the same as sothi with idiyappam (string hoppers).

vijayjohn wrote:Malayalees also put curry leaves in everything that has any kind of vegetables, meat, fish, or just spices, I guess (that's why you can see something green in all three of the pictures in this post). I honestly think this is pretty stupid. Curry leaves go well with some things (like the buttermilk I was talking about), but I don't agree with my family that putting them in everything makes any more sense than putting salt and pepper on everything.

It's not just Malayalees; Tamils do it too. Curry leaves (from what I've learned growing up) are used in South Asian cooking for smell, more than for taste. In fact, I hate biting into a curry leaf, because for me they taste very bitter.
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-12-12, 13:25

dEhiN wrote:OMG! Don't ever drink or try real buttermilk!!! I tried a little one time on its own and it's DISGUSTING!!!! (Note the all-caps and exclamation marks :D.) There are some recipes that call for it - I believe in baking.

Are you sure that's "real buttermilk," though? I've seen that in North America, people think "buttermilk" is just milk mixed with lemon juice or some bizarre thing like that, which of course is fucking disgusting. That's not what it's supposed to be at all. It's supposed to be what you get left over when you churn butter out of cream: you get butter and buttermilk (i.e. the "milk" left over after you churn the butter out of it, which is less fattening than butter because most of the fat in the cream is made into butter).
It's very sour, and not at all like either the taste nor consistency of milk nor liquid butter. Vijay, your parents basically make a watered-down yoghurt prep, which of course would be tasty even with plain rice.

Well, yeah.
It's the same as sothi with idiyappam (string hoppers).

Huh, you eat idiyappam like that? That makes a lot more sense to me than the way Malayalees eat it. Malayalees put sugar on top and eat it as a sweet thing, or something weird like that. :?
It's not just Malayalees; Tamils do it too.

Oh yeah, that's true. A lot of South Asians use curry leaves. Maybe Malayalees and Tamils do it more than most other South Asians though, idk.
Curry leaves (from what I've learned growing up) are used in South Asian cooking for smell, more than for taste.

Really? That's odd. When people in my family see me picking out every fucking curry leaf out of a dish, they're all like "but curry leaves taste so good!!!" and I'm like no, they fucking don't! I used to eat it right off the plant when I was younger, and I still do eat them in [kaːt͡ʃɯˈmoːɾɯ]. I know perfectly well how they taste. They're not terrible IMO, but:
In fact, I hate biting into a curry leaf, because for me they taste very bitter.

Yeah. I like that bitterness in combination with the sourness of [kaːt͡ʃɯˈmoːɾɯ] because it provides for an interesting contrast, but otherwise...dear family, come on, it's just a fucking leaf. It doesn't taste that great. :lol:

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby TheStrayCat » 2016-12-15, 13:44

A few days ago, I was on the Kyiv Subway and as I was about to get off I asked the man ahead of me (in Ukrainian) whether he was getting off at the same station, which is the standard question for this sort of situations here. He turned back and replied "Sorry?" in English, so when I saw his face I could clearly understand that he was a foreigner. I asked him the same in English ("Are you getting out at Khreshchatyk?"), at the same time realizing that if I had been in an English-speaking country I just would've had to say "Excuse me" or something like that. So I'm not even sure whether he understood the point of my question, but on the other hand I really had no other way out of the situation. :)

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-12-16, 23:04

A few days ago ( :P ), we got some junk call, and after the phone stopped ringing, we could hear a lingering beeping noise of some sort over the phone. Then I told my dad in Malayalam, "That noise is pretty much like a yakshi asking for slaked lime." He burst out laughing because he knew exactly what I meant.

A yakshi in Malayalee folklore is typically a very beautiful woman who is really a demoness in disguise, and slaked lime (another name for calcium hydroxide) is something that people in India tend to put on betel leaves (along with betel nut and possibly some other accompaniments, like coconut, chutneys, and sometimes even pieces of tobacco) before chewing them. A yakshi often comes up to a man in the forest or under a certain kind of tree asking for slaked lime, then uses this as a sort of opening line to seduce and then eat him (like a vulture, IIRC, leaving only the hair and nails behind). So if a woman comes up to a man under similar circumstances asking for slaked lime, that's supposed to be a sure sign that she's a yakshi. That was the point I was making about this particular kind of beep, because it always comes from junk callers, never from people we actually know (and would hopefully leave an actual message if we failed to pick up the phone).

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby mōdgethanc » 2016-12-17, 1:34

vijayjohn wrote:slaked lime (another name for calcium hydroxide) is something that people in India tend to put on betel leaves (along with betel nut and possibly some other accompaniments, like coconut, chutneys, and sometimes even pieces of tobacco) before chewing them
Why do you put it on betel leaves?

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-12-17, 1:46

mōdgethanc wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:slaked lime (another name for calcium hydroxide) is something that people in India tend to put on betel leaves (along with betel nut and possibly some other accompaniments, like coconut, chutneys, and sometimes even pieces of tobacco) before chewing them
Why do you put it on betel leaves?

To aid digestion, apparently. I've never had it myself or anything, but my understanding is that what people do is take a betel leaf, spread some slaked lime on it with their index finger, then add areca/betel nut and whatever else before folding it up and consuming it. Apparently, it's also used in making papadam sometimes as a substitute for baking soda. Maybe that's what that dusty stuff is on papadams my parents bought from India before they're fried.

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby dEhiN » 2016-12-17, 3:43

vijayjohn wrote:
dEhiN wrote:It's the same as sothi with idiyappam (string hoppers).

Huh, you eat idiyappam like that? That makes a lot more sense to me than the way Malayalees eat it. Malayalees put sugar on top and eat it as a sweet thing, or something weird like that. :?

Yeah the traditional way we eat it is with sothi and Coconut Sambal, as a carb dish alongside dahl and various meat curries.

I have had it with sugar and plain milk in a dessert-type way. But that's not the common way.

dEhiN wrote:Curry leaves (from what I've learned growing up) are used in South Asian cooking for smell, more than for taste.

Really? That's odd. When people in my family see me picking out every fucking curry leaf out of a dish, they're all like "but curry leaves taste so good!!!" and I'm like no, they fucking don't![/quote]
Yeah, from what my mom has told me. Maybe Sri Lankans mostly use it to add aroma, rather than for taste. In fact, while it's rare that the leaves are taken out of a curry after its been cooked, it can be somewhat common to take out the leaves when you're eating.
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-12-17, 3:57

dEhiN wrote:In fact, while it's rare that the leaves are taken out of a curry after its been cooked, it can be somewhat common to take out the leaves when you're eating.

Well, it is for us, too. But that's because in theory, at least, by the time it's been cooked, the leaves have imparted their flavor to whatever they were added to anyway. :)

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-14, 1:00

I'm not sure why I suddenly started thinking about this last night and then again a few times today, but here's my understanding so far of why the international standard for Indian restaurant cuisine has historically been based on an eclectic mixture of Mughal court cuisine and rural Punjabi cuisine: During Partition, former British India was in great turmoil as it was split into India and Pakistan, and Punjab must have been in an especially bad situation since it was also a region that was split between the two new countries. Partition may well have been the most violent thing ever to happen in the history of independent India, and so tons of Hindu and Sikh Punjabis fled south to Delhi with their clothes and their ovens or tandoors. Some of them also started selling the kind of food they made in tandoors. This was basically ordinary Punjabi food, but it was apparently unknown in Delhi at the time, where locals saw it as exotic and trendy, the kind of food that young men would eat at picnics with their girlfriends. From Delhi, it spread elsewhere in India and eventually worldwide, and so Punjabi cuisine (tandoori naan, tandoori chicken, lassi, butter chicken) was widely seen as being on a par with Mughal court cuisine (biryani, kurmas, kheema matar, maybe also gulab jamun).

It seems as if a lot of other aspects of Punjabi culture have come to be seen as trendy in India since then, too: Punjabi clothing, Punjabi-style weddings, even the Punjabi language if Bollywood songs and certain expressions people all over India use these days (chak de, balle balle, shava shava) without necessarily having any idea what they actually mean are any indication.

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby Saim » 2017-03-14, 3:04

vijayjohn wrote:It seems as if a lot of other aspects of Punjabi culture have come to be seen as trendy in India since then, too: Punjabi clothing, Punjabi-style weddings, even the Punjabi language if Bollywood songs and certain expressions people all over India use these days (chak de, balle balle, shava shava) without necessarily having any idea what they actually mean are any indication.


Imagine how much soft power we would have as a culture if:

1) Punjabi was used as a H-language (media, administration, education) in Pakistan on par with Urdu (and Bengali?)
2) Pakistan continued on the same trajectory it was on before General Zia

Honestly I feel like we've somehow managed to fuck ourselves up even more than the British did. Haye rabba, ki hoyega nasal da anjaam mera?

To be fair, if it wasn't for the trendiness of Panjabiyat in India and diasporic Punjabi culture I probably wouldn't have ended up identifying myself as desi at all.

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-03-14, 5:24

I just learned that there is such a thing as a Punjabi Language Movement in Pakistan and found this short video of some of its members going on hunger strike on International Mother Language Day, 2011 and demanding that the government give Punjabi exactly the kind of recognition you talked about:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72iAP0OjJw0

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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby dEhiN » 2017-03-14, 18:17

Saim wrote:1) Punjabi was used as a H-language (media, administration, education) in Pakistan on par with Urdu (and Bengali?)

I assume by H-language you mean heritage language? Also, does Bengali have more prestige in Pakistan than Punjabi ?
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby Osias » 2017-03-14, 20:12

dEhiN wrote:I assume by H-language you mean heritage language?

I think he is talking about the opposite of a L-language: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diglossia
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