Random Culture Thread

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Ciarán12
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby Ciarán12 » 2019-07-27, 11:47

I just saw an elderly woman fall down and several people immediately near her rushed over to help her up. It was in a bar and the waitress came over with a glass of water and offered it to her. It struck me that this is something I've seen pretty much any time anyone was sick or injured - whereever possible, they would be offered a glass of water, whether or not that would actually help the situation. It seems this is likely to be cross-cultural as given her accent I could tell the waitress was not Irish. Is this something that happens in your countries as well?

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Osias
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby Osias » 2019-07-27, 15:43

Here it does.
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

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Naava
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby Naava » 2019-07-27, 16:18

I've never heard of anyone offering something that is not clearly needed (like a glass of water if you fall down). The only thing that comes to my mind that is even remotely similar is how we're always drinking coffee. Is it morning? Coffee. Afternoon? Coffee. Break during your work day? Coffee. Visiting someone? Coffee. Weddings, funerals, graduations, birthdays? Coffee, coffee, coffee, and coffee. :mrgreen:

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Ciarán12
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby Ciarán12 » 2019-07-27, 16:38

Naava wrote:I've never heard of anyone offering something that is not clearly needed (like a glass of water if you fall down). The only thing that comes to my mind that is even remotely similar is how we're always drinking coffee. Is it morning? Coffee. Afternoon? Coffee. Break during your work day? Coffee. Visiting someone? Coffee. Weddings, funerals, graduations, birthdays? Coffee, coffee, coffee, and coffee. :mrgreen:


I think it's kind of a placebo; there's nothing I can do, I don't know what's wrong, I'm not a doctor, but I've got water and water's good for you (i.e good for absolutely everything always), take this and you'll feel better. And may times they do, either because water actually helped or because the placebo worked.

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linguoboy
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby linguoboy » 2019-07-29, 16:19

So here's one related to dining etiquette, specifically eating utensils.

Eating utensils (forks, knives, spoons, chopsticks, etc.) aren't to be touched unless you're actually using them to eat. Playing with them is considered extremely childish behaviour and will get you scolded. Pointing with them, either at people or objects, is considered very rude, as is putting them or keeping them in your mouth when they're not being used to convey food. You never share them or touch someone else's. To take something from a common dish or divide it into smaller pieces for sharing, you use dedicated serving utensils.

If I were eating with a friend and I saw them fidgeting with their silverware I would ask them if something was wrong. If they persisted in playing with them, I would ask them to stop.
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Johanna
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby Johanna » 2019-07-29, 16:58

linguoboy wrote:To take something from a common dish or divide it into smaller pieces for sharing, you use dedicated serving utensils.

This depends a bit. In really informal settings in Sweden — at least among the working class — it's fine to use your own utensils for that, as long as you haven't started eating and they thus haven't been anywhere near your mouth yet. And of course, you don't do it unless it's practical; it's not like you'd use your own spoon to scoop soup out of the pot for example.

Everything else you wrote still applies in all contexts though.
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Re: Random Culture Thread

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-08-03, 3:10

linguoboy wrote:To take something from a common dish or divide it into smaller pieces for sharing, you use dedicated serving utensils.

This is the only part I can say is true of modern Malayalee culture, and even this was not the case at least for most people until some time after independence. Traditionally, we didn't use utensils at all to eat. One or a few people would ladle out everyone's serving of food and only then sit down to eat, and everyone would eat with their right hand.


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