Music in minority languages

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-07-23, 2:17

The Teke languages are a group of Bantu languages forming a continuum and spoken around the Congo River. They're indigenous to both Brazzaville and Kinshasa. One of the Teke languages is called Ngungwel a.k.a. Ngungulu, Kingangoulou, or Northeastern (NE) Teke. The part up to 2:31 in the second clip in this link from the GRN is a song that's apparently in Ngungwel:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/A15821

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-07-24, 4:44

Koyo a.k.a. Kouyou or Ekoyo (possibly also known as Ekongo) is a Mboshi language spoken in the Republic of Congo. This is apparently a Koyo song and dance, part of the "Traditions Congolaises" series. The only two other Mboshi languages I haven't posted a song in yet are called Kwala and Mboko:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_KCtHVPBsQ

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-07-27, 6:04

Fuumu is another Teke language, sometimes considered specifically a South Teke language. The third clip in this GRN link consists of two songs that are supposedly in Fuumu:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/A02420

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-07-28, 2:44

Sengele is a Bantu language spoken a little bit to the north of Kinshasa (much closer to the city of Inongo) but apparently somewhat closely related to Lingala. This is a traditional Sengele song and dance (or I guess a clip of multiple songs and dances) performed (in 2013) in Kinshasa by a dance group called Ballet Arumbaya Ndendeli:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mMsXM-4USM

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-07-29, 15:44

Kuba a.k.a. Likuba or Kyba is a Bantu language. Wikipedia claims that it's spoken in Kasai in the (south of the) DRC and seems to suggest that it's a variety of Bangi (and thus closely related to Lingala), but Ethnologue says it's spoken in the ROC and is a Mboshi language closely related to Kwala. This is apparently a traditional Kuba song and dance (or maybe more than one song and dance):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNoJzpf3rwQ

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-07-29, 18:20

Ngiri is a Bantu language that's apparently part of the Ngondi-Ngiri group; I forgot to mention this, but Aka is also part of this group. One of the varieties of Ngiri is called Baloi. 2:43-3:26 of this GRN clip is a song that's apparently in Baloi:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/C22340

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-07-30, 21:08

Bala a.k.a. Lobala is another Ngondi-Ngiri language spoken in the northwestern part of the DRC, west of the Congo River. Apparently, 0:58-1:24 and 5:18 to the end of this GRN clip are songs in the Ikoka variety of Bala:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/C07990

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-01, 2:35

4:34-4:50 in this GRN clip is a very short song that's apparently in another variety of Bala called Mboko:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/C07991

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-02, 3:35

Gobu is apparently one of the Central Banda languages, which in turn form part of the Banda language group. It's spoken mainly in the DRC but also across the border in the CAR to the north. 3:39-4:30 of this GRN clip has a song that's apparently in Gobu:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/C23730

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-03, 3:34

Ngbaka a.k.a. Ngbaka Minagende or Ngbaka Gbaya is a Gbaya language spoken in the DRC. 00:47-3:28 of this GRN recording is a song that's apparently in Ngbaka:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/C08081

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-04, 4:32

Mboma a.k.a. Bomboma is a Bantu language spoken in the northwestern DRC, a bit to the north of the Congo River and east of the ROC (and separated from the ROC by (Lo)bala). It is apparently part of the Buja-Ngombe group, which is a very small group of Bantu languages all spoken in the DRC AFAICT (and maybe even more specifically in the northwestern DRC, perhaps even including the border area with the CAR). This is a traditional Mboma dance called "Mungebe" recorded by Jean-Claude Doloka, accompanied by what sounds like traditional singing in what I presume is also Mboma:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqE_2ZoQntM

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby Antea » 2018-08-04, 18:10


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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-05, 2:30

I actually posted that song in this same thread years ago! :D I love that song and remember it without even opening it (but I love opening it lol).

Likile is a Bantu language spoken in the DRC, apparently a member of the Soko or Soko-Kele languages (which are not many in number). 12:25-12:48 in this GRN clip is a song that's apparently in Likile:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/C23750

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-05, 3:15

Loki a.k.a. Boloki or Ruki is a variety of Losengo, a Bangi-Ntomba language very closely related to Binza (more closely related to Binza than to Bangi or Lingala, but still of course in the Bangi-Ntomba group along with all of these languages). This is a song apparently called "Bana Moye" and apparently by a group called "Boloki Bobe" in Loki:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCtxpW7QkRI

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby Lur » 2018-08-05, 14:22

When you're feeling medieval https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2_EZrZYQ50
Geurea dena lapurtzen uzteagatik, geure izaerari uko egiteagatik.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-05, 18:32

Boma a.k.a. Baboma or Kiboma is a Bantu language spoken in the southwestern DRC and part of the Boma-Dzing languages, which possibly include one or more varieties of Yansi. 3:27-3:53 of this GRN clip is a song apparently in Boma:
http://globalrecordings.net/en/program/C23270

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-09, 2:08

Kwese is a Holu-Pende language, closely related to Pende and apparently Mbala, spoken roughly in between the areas where these two languages are spoken near the city of Bandundu in the DRC. This is apparently a traditional dance with songs in Kwese from a village called Ngulu:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6awzMsu3ZdQ

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-11, 2:41

Suku is another Bantu language of the DRC of uncertain classification. Traditionally, it's classified as a Yaka language, but it's also been claimed that it's a Kongo language or a Pende/Holu language (i.e. more closely related to Pende, Kwese, and perhaps Mbala). I suppose it may be spoken in the ROC as well, since apparently, this clip is of singing in Suku but from the ROC:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgn8GCrJbpI

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-12, 0:43

Luvale a.k.a. Chiluvale, Lovale, Lubale, Luena, or Lwena is a Bantu language spoken in Zambia and, to a lesser extent, in Angola. It's apparently somewhat closely related to Luimbi. This is a traditional(?) Luvale song and dance for a festival called Makishi; I'm guessing it's performed in Zambia. The song is apparently called "Kanda Unguveta":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MK0BNQSxv68

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-08-12, 10:41

Nkoya is a Bantu language spoken in Zambia and possibly part of the Luban group within Bantu. Apparently, the Luban languages are in turn closely related to the Pende languages. This is a traditional court song in Nkoya, performed at a ceremony in Kaoma, Western Zambia, an annual ceremony that started in the year of my birth:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBI0_CoI_Kc
Last edited by vijayjohn on 2018-08-20, 20:19, edited 1 time in total.


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