Music in minority languages

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-03-06, 0:22

Kanembu is a Saharan language spoken in Chad. It's one of the closest linguistic relatives that Teda and Daza have, the other one being Kanuri, which is closely related to Kanembu. This is a song in Kanembu, apparently from a place called Meli, 35 kilometers away from Mao, with no instrumental accompaniment apart from body percussion:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhSJFmzGW3E

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-03-06, 3:59

Mas(s)a a.k.a. Masana is a Masa language, closely related to Musey, straddling the border between Chad and Cameroon. This is a song (actually repeated twice from start to finish in the video), presumably in Massa (it's certainly not in French, Arabic, English, or Camfranglais!), called "Peuple Massa" and performed by an artist named Ousman Ngana. I think he might be from the Cameroonian side of the border:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhoxN_X2_Qc

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby atalarikt » 2018-03-11, 10:33

Puyuma or Pinuyumayan is an Austronesian language of the Formosan branch spoken in Taiwan. It is one of the more divergent Austronesian languages, and falls outside reconstruction of Proto-Austronesian.
This is a short Puyuma song titled Vulay A Zekalr Za Pinuyumayan (Beautiful Pinuyumayan), sung by Sangpuy Katatepan Mavaliyw, who is more known for his album Dalan ("road" in Puyuma (as well Javanese and some other Austronesian languages), which is cognate with Indonesian/Malay "jalan").
https://youtu.be/KFd8_BrRLG4
Lyrics and Mandarin translation transliteration
► Show Spoiler
Last edited by atalarikt on 2018-03-12, 12:00, edited 1 time in total.
وَمِنْ آيَاتِهِ خَلْقُ السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضِ وَاخْتِلَافُ أَلْسِنَتِكُمْ وَأَلْوَانِكُمْ ۚ إِنَّ فِي ذَٰلِكَ لَآيَاتٍ لِلْعَالِمِينَ۝
"And of His signs is the creation of the heavens and the earth and the diversity of your languages and your colors. Indeed in that are signs for those of knowledge." (Ar-Rum: 22)

Jika saya salah, mohon diperbaiki. If I make some mistake(s), please correct me.
Forever indebted to Robert A. Blust for his contributions to Austronesian linguistics

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-03-12, 3:48

That's actually not a Mandarin translation, just the lyrics written using characters that sound in Mandarin like the original lyrics in Puyuma. :)

This is a song apparently from the Chadian town of Pala, but I'm not sure exactly which language it's in. The main language of Pala is Fulani, but the title of this YouTube video suggests that this song is instead in one of the Masa languages. In addition to the North Masa languages, such as Musey, the Masa languages also include the South Masa languages, all of which are commonly known as "Zimé." Among these languages are the languages of the Peve-Kaɗo branch, which are also all commonly known as "Kaɗo." These include the Pévé and Ngeté-Herdé languages, so presumably, this song is in one of those two languages:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFhPI8QdBdM

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-03-12, 4:03

vijayjohn wrote:This is a song apparently from the Chadian town of Pala, but I'm not sure exactly which language it's in. The main language of Pala is Fulani, but the title of this YouTube video suggests that this song is instead in one of the Masa languages. In addition to the North Masa languages, such as Musey, the Masa languages also include the South Masa languages, all of which are commonly known as "Zimé." Among these languages are the languages of the Peve-Kaɗo branch, which are also all commonly known as "Kaɗo." These include the Pévé and Ngeté-Herdé languages, so presumably, this song is in one of those two languages
It's probably Herdé, which is also known as "Zimé of Pala".

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-03-12, 4:05

No kidding! Thanks! :)

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby atalarikt » 2018-03-17, 0:19

Tuamotuan (Re'o Pa'umotu) is an Austronesian language belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian branch, specifically the Eastern Polynesian subdivision, that is spoken in the Tuamotu Islands, French Polynesia. This is a Tuamotuan song titled Fakateretere (Blowing (Wind)).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qm_tdlE0ajs
Lyrics and English translation
► Show Spoiler


vijayjohn wrote:That's actually not a Mandarin translation, just the lyrics written using characters that sound in Mandarin like the original lyrics in Puyuma. :)

Pretty reasonable I guess, given that Taiwan is a Chinese-speaking majority country, where the people aren't too used to the Roman script.
وَمِنْ آيَاتِهِ خَلْقُ السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضِ وَاخْتِلَافُ أَلْسِنَتِكُمْ وَأَلْوَانِكُمْ ۚ إِنَّ فِي ذَٰلِكَ لَآيَاتٍ لِلْعَالِمِينَ۝
"And of His signs is the creation of the heavens and the earth and the diversity of your languages and your colors. Indeed in that are signs for those of knowledge." (Ar-Rum: 22)

Jika saya salah, mohon diperbaiki. If I make some mistake(s), please correct me.
Forever indebted to Robert A. Blust for his contributions to Austronesian linguistics

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-03-18, 4:36

atalarikt wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:That's actually not a Mandarin translation, just the lyrics written using characters that sound in Mandarin like the original lyrics in Puyuma. :)

Pretty reasonable I guess, given that Taiwan is a Chinese-speaking majority country, where the people aren't too used to the Roman script.

I think it's possible that the Chinese script there is being used as a pronunciation guide for Han Chinese who are interested in learning how it's sung, especially for purposes such as karaoke. (Sometimes languages in minority languages become really popular for a brief period of time, at least in China!).

Marba is another Masa language even more closely related to Musey than Massa is. There are a few variants of this language that differ mainly in pronunciation, and it's spoken by many distinct ethnic groups in Chad. Both the language and these people when taken together are also known as "Azumeina." One of these groups is the Kolon a.k.a. Koloŋ or Kolong. This clip from the GRN has a fairly long song in Marba as spoken by the Kolong, from about 3:09 to 5:21.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby atalarikt » 2018-03-18, 11:59

Paiwan is an Austronesian language of the Formosan branch, spoken by the eponymous tribe in Taiwan. This is Abao (real name Aljenljeng Tjatjaljuvy), a Paiwan singer whose album, vavayan. (女人/Women), was titled the Best Album in Aboriginal Language in the 28th Golden Melody Awards, 2017. The song in this video is titled izuwa (/To Have/Own/Possess), which talks about the differences of Paiwan mothers in the past and present times.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EddPoDUuenI
Lyrics, Mandarin and English translations
► Show Spoiler


vijayjohn wrote:
atalarikt wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:That's actually not a Mandarin translation, just the lyrics written using characters that sound in Mandarin like the original lyrics in Puyuma. :)

Pretty reasonable I guess, given that Taiwan is a Chinese-speaking majority country, where the people aren't too used to the Roman script.

I think it's possible that the Chinese script there is being used as a pronunciation guide for Han Chinese who are interested in learning how it's sung, especially for purposes such as karaoke. (Sometimes languages in minority languages become really popular for a brief period of time, at least in China!).

It helps since Taiwan's Golden Melody Awards has categories specifically for Taiwanese Aboriginal languages.
وَمِنْ آيَاتِهِ خَلْقُ السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضِ وَاخْتِلَافُ أَلْسِنَتِكُمْ وَأَلْوَانِكُمْ ۚ إِنَّ فِي ذَٰلِكَ لَآيَاتٍ لِلْعَالِمِينَ۝
"And of His signs is the creation of the heavens and the earth and the diversity of your languages and your colors. Indeed in that are signs for those of knowledge." (Ar-Rum: 22)

Jika saya salah, mohon diperbaiki. If I make some mistake(s), please correct me.
Forever indebted to Robert A. Blust for his contributions to Austronesian linguistics

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-03-18, 21:54

This is another clip from GRN with a song from 5:10 to 6:44, this time apparently in Marba proper.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby opipik » 2018-03-20, 17:48

Rarotongan is a Polynesian language spoken in the Cook Islands by around --- people. This song is called "Ei Temarama". The song was recorded by a Papua New Guinean musician called Moses Tau on his first album, called "Moses Tau says Aloha". There have been quite a lot of PNG covers of Polynesian songs, especially by Motuan artists (and other Austronesian-speaking artists from the surrounding areas, such as the Paramana Strangers (especially the second generation) from the eponymous village on the nearby Aroma Coast). But this wave stopped at the turn of the millenium, and in 2008, autotune was introduced, giving the last blow to PNG music.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ro5SxxO9IYU

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-03-22, 5:00

This GRN clip begins with a song, apparently in the Kim language of southern Chad.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-01, 19:16

Kabalai a.k.a. Kaba Lai is an East Chadic language spoken in southern Chad, somewhat closely related to Nancere and Kera. The last clip in this GRN link is a song that's apparently in Kabalai.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-02, 5:46

Kimré is apparently a variety of (the East Chadian language) Nancere, at least according to Wikipedia, although it and several other (closely related) languages are all also known as simply "Gabri." This GRN clip is apparently in this language and has a song beginning at approximately 2:25 and ending at 4:52.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-02, 17:28

Kwang a.k.a. Kwong or Buso is another East Chadic language spoken in Chad and most closely related to Kera. This GRN clip has a song that's apparently in Kwang beginning at 8:24 and lasting until 10:39.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-02, 22:34

Tumak is an East Chadic language closely related to Somrai. The third clip on this GRN page is a song that's presumably in Tumak.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-07, 5:25

Doba (like Ngambay) is one of the Sara languages of Chad, which in turn are among the Bongo-Bagirmi languages. Traditionally, it's considered as three languages rather than one because it's spoken by three different ethnicities in southwestern Chad, namely the Bedjond, Mango, and Gor; it's not clear to me to what extent their varieties differ. I'm not sure what language this song is in, but I think it may be a Gor song in Doba. In any case, it's from a YouTube channel that only has songs from Chad and Cameroon, and it's definitely not in one of the majority languages of either country (or even of any of the neighboring countries):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3XdQibB2oo

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-15, 5:53

Niellim is one of the Mbum-Day languages of southwestern Chad. Within the Mbum-Day languages, it is within a subgroup of languages called the Bua languages; all these languages are spoken in southern Chad. Most of the singing in this video is traditional singing in Niellim (which accompanies their traditional dances). This is apparently a video of the "2017 Niellim cultural week" that apparently takes place for a week every(?) year:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLpk2h4QllE

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-04-29, 22:53

There is a small group of Bongo-Bagirmi languages called the Kaba languages. One of them is Kaba Deme a.k.a. Kaba Démé, Kaba 'Dem, Ta Sara, Sara Deme, or Dem. It's spoken both in southern Chad and across the border in the Central African Republic. The last clip on this page on the GRN is a song that's apparently in Kaba Deme.

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Re: Music in minority languages

Postby OldBoring » 2018-04-30, 9:42

vijayjohn wrote:
atalarikt wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:That's actually not a Mandarin translation, just the lyrics written using characters that sound in Mandarin like the original lyrics in Puyuma. :)

Pretty reasonable I guess, given that Taiwan is a Chinese-speaking majority country, where the people aren't too used to the Roman script.

I think it's possible that the Chinese script there is being used as a pronunciation guide for Han Chinese who are interested in learning how it's sung, especially for purposes such as karaoke. (Sometimes languages in minority languages become really popular for a brief period of time, at least in China!).

Han Chinese? Mandarin is the native language of many non-Han people too in China and in Taiwan...

In China Italian songs are often accompanied by a pronunciation guide written in Pinyin.
E.g.

Che bella cosa
gei beila guosa

na jurnata 'e sole
na youernada ei suolei

Edit:
I've seen the video, and it seems that the Mandarin part is a translation. But a lot of parts look like transliteration because probably they are proper names? Maybe king names, god names, person names, geographical names? I donno.


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