Greeting people

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languagepotato
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Greeting people

Postby languagepotato » 2014-04-06, 9:36

so, yeah how do you greet people in your country

in Morocco, it's like this:

if they're the same sex:
if you have deep respect for them and/or are elderly: you lift their right hand to your mouth and kiss it.
if you know them very well, either as family or as very close friends: kiss right cheek, left cheek, right cheek, left cheek, while hugging them
if you know them well, but not at 'cheek-kissing'-level: a firm handshake
if you're acquaintances: nod

if they're the opposite sex:
if they're elderly family: the right-hand kissing thing
if they're family, (not counting in-laws): the whole cheek kissing proces
if they're in-laws: hug them
if you know them well, and they aren't family: a firm handshake
if they're acquaintances: nod

all these greetings go accompanied with: salam 3alaykum (peace upon you) or if you haven't seen them in a long time: ahleen


i'll leave the dutch greeting process for another dutch person on this forum
native: (ar-MA) (nl)
very comfortable: (en-US)
somewhat comfortable: (de) (es) (af)
forgetting: (fr) (ar-arb)
touristy level: (ro) (sv)(ber)(pl)
someday hopefully: (ja) (sq) (cs) (tr) and many others

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Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
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Re: Greeting people

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2014-04-06, 9:57

We might have had this thread before, but anyway...

Normal situations, both when you arrive and when you depart:
- Family: Depends, but most of the time one or three kisses, only handshakes when it's with two men. I really hate this so I try to avoid it. I know my sister hates it too so we just say 'Hey' to each other (and 'Doei' when leaving).
- Friends: When you don't see each other that often, you give each other three kisses. Don't know about men, I'll leave that to another Dutch person on this forum. When you see them quite often, you just say say: 'Hey' or 'Hallo' or something like that (and 'Doei' when leaving).
- Acquaintances: A handshake.

Birthdays, other congratulating stuff like wishing each other a happy new year:
- You kiss the one you congratulate three times, only handshakes when it's with two men. When it's with a man and a woman you may try to skip the kissing part.
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Learns: Indonesian and baby signs
Knows also (a bit): English, German, Turkish, French, Danish

Corrections appreciated.

IpseDixit

Re: Greeting people

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-04-06, 10:31

Normal situations, both when you arrive and when you depart:
- Family: usually two cheek kisses (usually only between females or male and female, very seldom between male and male), usually a handshake between males.

- Friends: same as above, if it's between males you may also add a "manly" (xD) hug or a pat on the shoulders. Things may be a bit different between gay friends (cheek kissing is quite common if not the norm).

- Acquaintances: A handshake.

Birthdays, other congratulating stuff like wishing each other a happy new year:

- You kiss the one you congratulate 2 times, or again a "manly" hug and a pat on the shoulders for males.

Post Scriptum: by cheek kissing I mean cheek to cheek, not lips to cheek.

I'm surprised to see how much you kiss in the Netherlands, I thought it was more of a Southern thing. Last month I tried to kiss two German girls on the cheek and it was one of the most awkward moments of the year xD.

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Re: Greeting people

Postby vijayjohn » 2014-04-06, 20:02

Malayalam doesn't have a word for 'hi'. If any of us Malayalees feels like saying it (in which case we're likely to be younger), we just say it in English. In a formal context (which usually means when we're greeting someone who is considerably older than us), we may make a namaste gesture, perhaps bow, and say [n̪ə̃məsˈkaːɾə̃m]. Otherwise, we don't really greet; we just jump straight into asking some variation of 'how are you?'.

When I take a walk around the neighborhood and come across somebody, I try to see whether they're ignoring me or not, and if not, then I think I usually respond by nodding (and sometimes also wave if they're doing that, too).

If someone comes to our house and they're not Indian (which seldom happens), then I just greet them normally, like saying "hi" and shaking hands or whatever. If they're Indian but not related to me, I suddenly act very shy, wobble my head a lot, and smile even more but still say "hi." :lol: If they're related to me, then I just say "hi" (albeit enthusiastically) when they come in, but when they leave, each of us hugs each visiting relative.

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Re: Greeting people

Postby Johanna » 2014-04-07, 22:34

In Sweden it's erratic and about the person.

With my siblings and my parents it will be just "hi", our bond is deep enough that it's not necessary to express it outwardly.

Most other relatives will get a handshake unless I have an extra close bond with them, like a few cousins and my grandmothers, they get a hug instead.

Close friends also get a hug.
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Re: Greeting people

Postby mōdgethanc » 2014-04-08, 7:32

In contact-phobic North America, close friends get a small, halfhearted wave at most, acquaintances get a passing nod, and family members get fuck-all. Nah, just kidding - my old nana gets a hug. I'm not that much of a sociopath.

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Marah
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Re: Greeting people

Postby Marah » 2014-04-08, 14:52

languagepotato wrote:so, yeah how do you greet people in your country

in Morocco, it's like this:

if they're the same sex:
if you have deep respect for them and/or are elderly: you lift their right hand to your mouth and kiss it.
if you know them very well, either as family or as very close friends: kiss right cheek, left cheek, right cheek, left cheek, while hugging them
if you know them well, but not at 'cheek-kissing'-level: a firm handshake
if you're acquaintances: nod

if they're the opposite sex:
if they're elderly family: the right-hand kissing thing
if they're family, (not counting in-laws): the whole cheek kissing proces
if they're in-laws: hug them
if you know them well, and they aren't family: a firm handshake
if they're acquaintances: nod

all these greetings go accompanied with: salam 3alaykum (peace upon you) or if you haven't seen them in a long time: ahleen


i'll leave the dutch greeting process for another dutch person on this forum


I've also heard that in Maghreb people ask several times in a row "How are you doing? How is the family doing?" etc



In France:

Family: you kiss both cheeks regardless of their gender

between two girls or a guy and a girl: you kiss both cheeks
between two guys: a handshake
unless you're into rugby then yeah, you might kiss both cheeks as well

in some regions people kiss cheeks 3 times.

in some contexts like in the working world (when you don't really know the person because you don't see them often) guys often give handshakes to girls

Now, when I say "kiss cheeks" it doesn't mean that you actually have to kiss the cheek, you just touch it with your cheek!
Par exemple, l'enfant croit au Père Noël. L'adulte non. L'adulte ne croit pas au Père Noël. Il vote.

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Re: Greeting people

Postby languagepotato » 2014-04-08, 16:48

Marah wrote:I've also heard that in Maghreb people ask several times in a row "How are you doing? How is the family doing?" etc


yep, it's basically the maghrebi version of 'long time no see'
native: (ar-MA) (nl)
very comfortable: (en-US)
somewhat comfortable: (de) (es) (af)
forgetting: (fr) (ar-arb)
touristy level: (ro) (sv)(ber)(pl)
someday hopefully: (ja) (sq) (cs) (tr) and many others

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Re: Greeting people

Postby JuxtapositionQMan » 2014-04-10, 0:43

My experience:
Formal:
"Hi"/"Hello"
Handshake
Ask how each other are doing

Informal:
"Hi"/"Hello"
Hug
Ask how each other are doing
Well, that was a thing.
speak: [flag=]en[/flag][flag=]eo[/flag]
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Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
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Re: Greeting people

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2014-04-10, 19:05

Okay, why do the Dutch people kiss so much? :shock:

Johanna wrote:our bond is deep enough that it's not necessary to express it outwardly


That's nice, I think I see it that way too. Shame the rest doesn't :wink:
Native: Dutch
Learns: Indonesian and baby signs
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Corrections appreciated.

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Re: Greeting people

Postby monkeybread » 2014-05-29, 8:31

In my culture we will do handshakes at most greetings (between guys)
in a very casual meeting, maybe a handwave with a hi..
between girls in a formal meeting they will do cheek-and-cheek touching

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Re: Greeting people

Postby Prowler » 2014-06-02, 19:47

Males shake hands and females will kiss each other on the cheek, as do people of opposite sexes if they are not strangers. On a business setting, no one will kiss anyone on the cheek. And a male and a female that don' know each other very well are unlikely to kiss each other on the cheek.

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Re: Greeting people

Postby mōdgethanc » 2014-06-02, 19:59

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:Okay, why do the Dutch people kiss so much? :shock:
Because Dutchies are weird, of course.

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Re: Greeting people

Postby linguoboy » 2014-06-02, 20:14

mōdgethanc wrote:In contact-phobic North America

Not all of us are as cold-blooded as you mooseloving puckheads.

Among my gay friends, greetings tend to be warm indeed. Generally a hug, often a kiss as well. Non-natives and those who have spent time abroad may perform an accolade à la française, otherwise it's a peck on the check or a kiss full on the lips. For a while there, my buddy Grunter and I, as a running joke, used to go through this elaborate pantomime of falling on each other and making out whenever we ran into each other at a bar.
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Re: Greeting people

Postby Levike » 2014-06-02, 21:18

Male-male: handshake (almost always)

Female-female: kiss on the cheek maybe (not that often, depends how close they are)

Male-female: kiss on the cheek if you know her very well, handshake if it's very formal.

But most of the time it's only a "hi" and "goodbye", whatever gender.

Except for guys, which kind of always has a handshake too.
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Re: Greeting people

Postby loqu » 2014-06-02, 21:39

Male-male: handshake
Female-female: a kiss on each cheek
Male-female: a kiss on each cheek
Male-male in the same family or very close friends: a kiss on each cheek
Very close friends also hug sometimes

I'd make a remark on the gay scene greetings: gay men here usually kiss each other on the cheeks to greet. Once I was with a friend in a gay club and he introduced me to some other guy. I offered to shake his hand and then this guy asked my friend: 'is he straight?' :lol:
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Re: Greeting people

Postby Lada » 2014-06-03, 11:27

What I see everyday:

male-male: it's always a handshake, even if males are close friends. I saw hugs only in movies and in.. news.
female-female: hello/hi or a cheek kiss depending on the depth of the relations, i.e. if they are friends, they usually give a short cheek kiss. But it depends on people, it's not a rule.
male-female: only hi/hello, kiss cheek is a very rare case, I saw that only among young adults once or twice. But if male and female are a couple, they can do a mouth kiss. During a business meeting I can shake man's hand but it happened to me only one-two times, not more. Usually males and females don't shake hands.

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Re: Greeting people

Postby mōdgethanc » 2014-06-04, 4:05

linguoboy wrote:Not all of us are as cold-blooded as you mooseloving puckheads.
http://unilang.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=41436&p=950983#p950983
Among my gay friends, greetings tend to be warm indeed. Generally a hug, often a kiss as well. Non-natives and those who have spent time abroad may perform an accolade à la française, otherwise it's a peck on the check or a kiss full on the lips. For a while there, my buddy Grunter and I, as a running joke, used to go through this elaborate pantomime of falling on each other and making out whenever we ran into each other at a bar.
Among my straight and gay friends, hugging is quite common. Of course, in the Great White North, any sort of physical activity that helps keep us from freezing to death in the arctic air is worthwhile.

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Re: Greeting people

Postby linguoboy » 2014-10-24, 16:59

Image
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Greeting people

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2014-10-24, 17:08

Five times :shock: That sounds like: as long as it takes to give the other the same cold as you are having or something.
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Corrections appreciated.


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