Childhood Rhymes

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Childhood Rhymes

Postby Dormouse559 » 2012-11-20, 4:36

What are the rhymes you learned as a child? I'm specifically thinking of ones that were probably said by two or more children while doing some sort of hand game. A rhyme I learned that seems relatively common is "Miss Mary Mac":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyKarjDZQG8&feature=fvwrelMiss Mary Mac, Mac, Mac
All dressed in black, black, black
With silver buttons, buttons, buttons
All down her back, back, back
She asked her mother, mother, mother
For fifty cents, cents, cents
To see the elephant, elephant, elephant
Jump over the fence, fence, fence
She jumped so high, high, high
That she reached the sky, sky, sky
And she never came back, back, back
Till the Fourth of July, July, July.


Here are a few others I remember:

Miss Sue, Miss Sue, Miss Sue from Alabama,
Sitting on a rocker, eating Betty Crocker,
Watching the clock go
Tick, tock, tick, tock, banana rock
Tick, tock, tick, tock, banana rock
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, wash those spiders off of me.
Mooshka, mooshka, I know karate.
Mooshka, mooshka, I love my mommy.
Mooshka, mooshka, Oops, I'm sorry.
You better be sorry.
I'm not sorry.
FREEZE!

Miss Suzy had a turtle; she named him Tiny Tim.
She put him in a bathtub to see if he could swim.
He drank up all the water. He ate up all the soap.
He tried to eat the bathtub, but it wouldn't go down his throat.
Miss Suzy called the doctor, Miss Suzy called the nurse,
Miss Suzy called the lady with the alligator purse.
"Measles," said the doctor. "Mumps," said the nurse.
"Nothing," said the lady with the alligator purse.

Lemonade … crunchy ice
Beat it once … beat it twice
Lemonade, crunchy ice
Beat it once, beat it twice
Oh yeah! Sugar!
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby linguoboy » 2012-11-20, 5:00

I never learned any of those. More surprisingly, I don't recall hearing my sister sing recite them with her friends either. The only rhymes me and my brothers had any use for were counting out rhymes like "My Mother" and "Eeney Meeny Miney Moe". I'm sure everyone knows a version of the latter. The former goes:

My Mother And Your Mother
Were Hang-Ing Up Clothes
My Mother Punched Your Mother
Right In The Nose
What Colour Was The Blood?

[Switch targets with each capitalised word or syllable. Whoever you are pointing at on "Blood" names a colour, which you spell out, changing targets with each letter. If you don't end up with the target you wanted, you could cheat by adding another line like "My Mother Told Me To Pick The Very Best One" which could be further extended (e.g. "And That Is You" or "And You Are O-U-T").]
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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Bijlee » 2012-11-20, 5:00

Dormouse559 wrote:Miss Sue, Miss Sue, Miss Sue from Alabama,
Sitting in a rocker, eating Betty Crocker,
Watching the clock go
Tick, tock, tick, tock, banana rock
Tick, tock, tick, tock, banana rock
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, wash those spiders off of me.
Mooshka, mooshka, I know karate.
Mooshka, mooshka, I love my mommy.
Mooshka, mooshka, Oops, I'm sorry.
You better be sorry.
I'm not sorry.
FREEZE!


We song this as:
Miss Sue, Miss Sue, Miss Sue from Alabama, Alaska, Nebraska
Sitting in a rocker, eating Betty Crocker,
Watching the clock go
Tick, tock, tick, tock, banana rock(sometimes we said "around the clock" instead of "banana rock")
Tick, tock, tick, tock, banana rock
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, wash those spiders off of me. boy germs off of me
Mooshka, mooshka, mooshka I know karate.
Mooshka, mooshka, I love my mommy.
Mooshka, mooshka, Oops, I'm sorry.
You better be sorry.
I'm not sorry.

FREEZE!
_______
We also had these:

Double double this this
Double double that that
Double this
Double that
Double double this that

We'd replace "this" and "this" with words like Ice-cream or whatever we could think of. So:
Double double ice ice
Double double cream cream
Double ice
Double cream
Double double ice cream
________

Little Sally Walker: In this one everyone gets in a circle and one girl(Sally) will walk around until the "Hey girl" thing starts and then she'll stop in front of whoever she's at in the circle.

Little Sally Walker, walkin' down the street
she didn't know what to do, so she stopped in front of me
She said, "Hey girl, do your thing, do your thing- Switch!" ("Sally" does a dance)
"Hey girl, do your thing, do your thing- Switch!"(other girl copies)

Then it starts over with the other girl as Sally.
____________

And for jump roaping:

Fudge fudge, call the judge
(kid's name)'s gonna have a baby
Wrap it up in tissue paper
send it down the escalator
How many will there be?
1, 2, 3, 4....(until someone messes up)
_____________

Bubble gum, bubble gum in a dish
how many pieces do you wish?
1, 2, 3, 4.........
______________

Here's one they made the exchange students do and then one taught me:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gdT0gl62Eg

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Dormouse559 » 2012-11-20, 5:13

linguoboy wrote:My Mother And Your Mother
Were Hang-Ing Up Clothes
My Mother Punched Your Mother
Right In The Nose
What Colour Was The Blood?
I knew a version of this, but it was for jumprope.

My mom and your mom
Were hanging out the clothes
My mom gave your mom
A punch in the nose
How many punches did she give?
Was it 1, 2, 3, … (and so on until the jumper messed up)
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

Bijlee

Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Bijlee » 2012-11-20, 5:45

Somewhat related, I remember we sang songs that go on indefinitely:

This is the song that never ends,
yes it goes on and on, my friend
Some people started singing it not knowing what it was
and they'll just keep on singing it forever just because....(repeat)

And....

I know a song that gets on everybody's nerves, everybody's nerves, everybody's nerves.
I know a song that gets on everybody's nerves and this is how it goes (bum bum bum!)
Repeat....

This one I think is kind of creepy:

The cow went up the hill
The cow went up the hill
Next verse?
Same as the first.
It never gets better,
it only gets worse.

Repeat!

Bijlee

Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Bijlee » 2012-11-20, 6:13

I forgot the most obvious clapping game- Patty-cake(or pat-a-cake):

Patty cake, patty cake, baker's man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it
Pat it
And mark it with a 2
Put it in the oven for [other person] and me!

Oh also, the jumping rope ones I put earlier were also clapped too sometimes.
I'm trying to remember this one clapping chant that was really fun....

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Dormouse559 » 2012-11-20, 6:23

Bijlee wrote:Patty cake, patty cake, baker's man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it
Pat it
And mark it with a 2
Put it in the oven for [other person] and me!
I learned this as:
Patty cake, patty cake, baker's man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it
Pat it
And mark it with a 2 B
Put it in the oven for [other person] baby and me!
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Aleco » 2012-11-20, 7:56

Usually the girls would do this, so there's only two that I remember having heard. Other songs were usually sung as part of regular games or jumping rope games.

Ro, ro til fiskeskjer
Ro, ro til fiskeskjer
Mange fiskar får vi der
Ein til far og ein til bror
Ein til syster og ein til mor
Og ein til den som fisken drog
Og det var vesle ___mor/bror


Row, row to the shallow waters where fish are in abundance
Row, row, to the shallow waters [~~~]
There we catch a lot of fish
One for father and one for brother
One for sister and one for mother
And one for the one who pulled the fish up
And that was little/young [name]mor/bror (f/m)
(a cute suffix)

Tjuven, Tjuven skal du heite
Tjuven, Tjuven skal du heite
For du stal min beste ven
Men eg har eit håp på beite
At eg snart får ein igjen
Trur eg, tralala
Trur eg, tralala
Trur eg, tralala
Det trur eg, tralala
Trur eg, tralala


The Thief, The Thief shall be your name
The Thief, The Thief shall be your name
Cause you stole my best friend
But I've got a hope that I'm nurturing
That I'll soon get another one
So I believe, la la la
So I believe, la la la
So I believe, la la la
That's what I believe, la la la
So I believe, la la la
Last edited by Aleco on 2012-11-20, 8:22, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Childhood rhymes

Postby MillMaths » 2012-11-20, 8:11

    A B C D E
    Once a guy asked me
    F G H I J
    “Let’s have sex, okay?”
    K L M N O
    How could I say no?
    P Q R S
    So I said yes.
    T U V W X
    Then we both had sex
    Y Z*
    In bed.
*You have to use the British pronunciation of Z make it rhyme.

Bijlee

Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Bijlee » 2012-11-20, 20:24

Bijlee wrote:I'm trying to remember this one clapping chant that was really fun....


I remember:

Crocodile oh my croc croc croc
Stacey majigga jigga jigga jock
Slow, slow- you're too slow
1 2 3 4 5 you're out!

When you did the "You're out" part you'd both grab each others' hands and try to cross them. Whoever's arms are crossed loses.

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Spaigelploatje » 2012-11-20, 23:57

Hmm,some simple ones:

Ben je boos?
Pluk een roos.
Zet hem op je hoed,
Dan ben je morgen weer goed.

Are you mad?
Pick a rose
Put it on your hat,
So you'll feel well tomorrow



And one where children need to move their arms corresponding to the profession or animal mentioned:
In de maneschijn, in de maneschijn,
Klom ik op het trapje naar het raamkozijn,
En je raadt het niet, en je raadt het niet,
Zo doe een vogel en zo doet een vis,
Zo doet een duizendpoot die schoenenpoetser is,
En dat is recht, en dat is krom,
En nu draaien we het wieltje nog eens om...

In the moon shine, in the moon shine
I climbed on the stairs to the window-frame
And you won't guess, and you won't guess
Like this does a bird and like this does a fish
Like this does a centipede who's a shoe shiner
And that is straight, and that is crooked
and now we turn the wheel another time...
:para:


Oose wiese woose
Wiese walla kristalla
Kristoose wiese woose
Wiese wies wies wies wies!

Untranslatable

Several different ones are combined in Juffrouw Toos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jU1iQNcVPXU

"Altijd is Kortjakje ziek"
Altijd is Kortjakje ziek
Midden in de week maar 's zondags niet
's Zondags gaat zij naar de kerk
Met een haar boek vol zilverwerk
Altijd is Kortjakje ziek
Midden in de week maar 's zondags niet

"Berend Botje ging uit varen"
Berend Botje ging uit varen
met zijn scheepje naar Zuidlaren
de weg was recht, de weg was krom
nooit kwam Berend Botje weerom.

Een, twee, drie, vier, vijf, zes, zeven
waar is Berend Botje gebleven?
Hij is niet hier, hij is niet daar
hij is naar Amerika.


"Op een grote paddestoel"

Op een grote paddestoel,
Rood met witte stippen,
Zat kabouter Spillebeen,
Heen en weer te wippen.
Krak, zei toen de paddestoel,
Met een diepe zucht,
Allebei de beentjes,
Hoepla in de lucht!

"Ollekebolleke"

Olleke bolleke
Rubisolleke
Olleke bolleke
Knol!


"In Den Haag daar woont een graaf"

In Den Haag daar woont een graaf
En zijn zoon heet Jantje
Als je vraagt waar woont je pa
Dan wijst hij met zijn handje
Met zijn vingertje en zijn duim
Op zijn hoed draagt hij een pluim
Aan zijn arm een mandje
Dag mijn lieve Jantje

"Mosselman"
Zeg ken jij de mosselman,
de mosselman,
de mosselman
Zeg ken jij de mosselman,
die woont in Scheveningen

Ja ik ken de mosselman,
de mosselman,
de mosselman
Ja ik ken de mosselman,
die woont in Scheveningen

Samen kennen we de mosselman,
de mosselman,
de mosselman
Samen kennen we de mosselman,
die woont in Scheveningen

In een groen knollenland
In een groen, groen, groen, groen knollen-knollenland
Daar zaten twee haasjes heel parmant
En de één die blies de fluite-fluite-fluit
En de ander sloeg de trommel

Toen kwam opeens een jager-jager-man
En die heeft er één geschoten
En dat heeft naar men wel denken denken kan
De ander zeer verdroten

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby ILuvEire » 2012-11-21, 5:39

Omg I learned all of these. I worked at a summer camp for three years in high school, so I deeefinitely learned some. Here's one that I learned as a kid and is still popular with kids these days (shit, I'm only 18 guys, I was doing these probably 8 years ago).

I went to a Chinese restaurant
to buy a loaf of bread, bread, bread
They asked me what my name was
and this is what I said, said, said:

My name is /iː aɪ iː aɪ ˈmɪkənaɪ ˈmɪkənaɪ pɔːm pɔːm puː jə ˈwɪli ˈwɪli ˈwɪskɚrz/
[Sometimes omitted: My name is] chief roast beef banana-fama fo feef
[Sometimes omitted: My name is] Elvis Prestly is so sexy! (or Elvis Prestly! Girls are sexy!)

EDIT: Oh I thought of more!

Hinky pinky ponky
Daddy had a donkey
Donkey died
Daddy cried
hinky pinky ponky

Another one:
Mister, mister bus driver, bus driver, bus driver
mister, mister bus driver, bus driver man.

He drinks (or smokes or yells) and he cusses,
he stinks up the busses,

Mister, mister bus driver, bus driver, bus driver
mister, mister bus driver, bus driver man.

A jump rope one:
Cinderella, dressed in yella
went upstairs to kiss a fella.
She made a mistake
and got bit by a snake,
How many doctors will it take?
(Then you count until someone messes up).

I have a Spanish one, but I literally have no idea how accurate it is. This is little kids speaking Spanish through the ears of a monolingual English speaker + 10 years of forgetting.

Un elefante se columbiapa
sobre la tela de un araña
como vea que resiste
fua a llamar a otro elefante

I don't fucking know something about elephants and spiders.
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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Antonym » 2012-12-01, 19:30

ILuvEire wrote:I have a Spanish one, but I literally have no idea how accurate it is. This is little kids speaking Spanish through the ears of a monolingual English speaker + 10 years of forgetting.

Un elefante se columbiapa
sobre la tela de un araña
como vea que resiste
fua a llamar a otro elefante

I don't fucking know something about elephants and spiders.


Hey, we have that one in Norwegian too!

En elefant kom marsjerende,
bortover edderkoppens fine spinn.
Syntes at veien var så interessant,
at han ville ha med seg en annen elefant!

To elefanter kom marsjerende,
bortover edderkoppens fine spinn.
Syntes at veien var så interessant,
at de ville ha med seg en tredje elefant!

(First verse is about one elephant walking down the spider's net and wanting to bring another one, in the second verse you start off with two elephants and it goes on and on...)

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-12-12, 20:14

The ones Spaigelploatje describes aren't really games, they're just songs/ rhymes mostly.

The fun thing with those hand clap games is that sometimes children learn a really weird version to each other and sometimes they just must have been wrong. For example, I always sang: 'De rivier de Ronde' but that must have been 'De rivier de Rhône', haha.

It went on like this (my version):

De rivier de Ronde is een wilde vloed
Ga je mee naar Londen kijk dan hoe dat moet
Met z'n tweeën in galop al naar de overkant
maar niet in de diepte kijken want we
zijn-aan-land

You could that with a whole group, you could be clapped off with the 'land'. The text must originally have been different because 'want we zijn aan land' (because we are at land) absolutely doesn't make sense when the whole song is about water.

This one you had to do with two. I have absolutely no idea which language this is, so I just write it down like we sang it (Dutch spelling):

sisi mai emmi
mai ester demmi
mai ester swi

Does anyone recognise this...?

I'll write down other games later, maybe with translation too.


[edit] Oh, and our counting out rhyme:

Iet wiet waait weg jij hebt eerlijk pech
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Learns: Latin and baby signs
Knows also (a bit): English, German, Turkish, French, Danish

Corrections appreciated.

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Allekanger » 2012-12-12, 20:50

Antonym wrote:
ILuvEire wrote:I have a Spanish one, but I literally have no idea how accurate it is. This is little kids speaking Spanish through the ears of a monolingual English speaker + 10 years of forgetting.

[...]

I don't fucking know something about elephants and spiders.


Hey, we have that one in Norwegian too!

[...]

(First verse is about one elephant walking down the spider's net and wanting to bring another one, in the second verse you start off with two elephants and it goes on and on...)
Oh I like this one. This is how we sang it:

En elefant balanserade
På en liten, liten spindeltråd
Det tyckte han var så intressant
Att han gick och hämtade en annan elefant

Två elefanter balanserade...


And the elefants become innumerable! :D
Spruttjna e dom förút å värre bir dom.

- svenska (norlupplänska), English, 中文, español, русский, esperanto.

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-12-12, 20:56

Dutch innummerable song:

ik heb een potje met vet
al op de tafel gezet
ik heb een potje potje potje potje ve-he-het
al op de tafel gezet

Dit is het tweede couplet
ik heb een potje met vet
al op de tafel gezet
ik heb een potje potje potje potje ve-he-het
al op de tafel gezet

Dit is het derde couplet
ik heb een potje met vet
al op de tafel gezet
ik heb een potje potje potje potje ve-he-het
al op de tafel gezet

Dit is het vierde couplet
ik heb een potje met vet
...
Native: Dutch
Learns: Latin and baby signs
Knows also (a bit): English, German, Turkish, French, Danish

Corrections appreciated.

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Kohlensäure » 2012-12-24, 23:31

No german rhymes here yet? :D

Morgens früh um sechs, kommt die kleine Hex'
Morgens früh um sieben, schält sie gelbe Rüben
Morgens früh um acht, wird Kaffee gemacht
Morgens früh um neune, geht sie in die Scheune
Morgens früh um zehn, holt sie Holz und Spän'
Morgens früh um elf, kocht sie bis um zwölf
Fröschebein und Krebs und Fisch, hurtig Kinder kommt zu Tisch!

It means:
In the morning at 6, the little witch comes
In the morning at 7, she peals yellow turnips
In the morning at 8, she puts on coffee
In the morning at 9, she goes to the barn
In the morning at 10, she brings wood and strands
In the morning at 11, she cooks until 12 o' clock
Froglegs, crabs and fish, quick children come and eat.

Its a rhyme that children often use before lunch. At kindergarden, children learn a lot of rhymes like this before eating. Here is another one:

Piep, piep, piep. Wir haben uns alle lieb. Jeder isst so viel er kann, nur nicht seinen Nebenmann. Und wir nehmens ganz genau, auch nicht seine Nebenfrau.

It means: Peep, peep, peep, we are fond of eachother. Everybody eats so much as possible, except for his neighbour (male). And we are very accurate, also not his neighbour (female).

In kindergarden, I also learned a song to memorize the months of the year.

Januar, Ferbuar, März, April, die Jahresuhr steht niemals still.
Mai, Juni, Juli, August, weckt in uns allen die Lebenslust
September, Oktober, November, Dezember und dann, und dann, fängt das ganze schon wieder von vorne an!

Frohe Weihnachten!
(de)(zh)(es-cl)(en)(fi)

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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Aleco » 2012-12-30, 6:58

Antonym wrote:Hey, we have that one in Norwegian too!

Never even heard of it :lol:

But I just remembered a game! You start off with two people opposite each other tugging in a rocking motion as you say the following verse:

Gubben og Gamla låg og dro
Og ikkje fekk opp rota
Men hadde dei hatt han Einball her
Så hadde dei fått opp rota


The old man and the old woman were tugging on the ground
And couldn't get the root out
But if they'd gotten Oneball to come
They would've gotten the root out


And then Oneball (-ball just being a weird suffix right here, mich like "Oddball"), i.e. another person, comes and starts helping either the old man or the old woman. And this continues all the way until the last verse, which technically could be [whe]never. For simplicity's sake, there's 12 people playing in my example. Last verse:

Og Tiball kom og Tiball drog
Og Tiball og Niball og Åtteball
Og Sjuball og Seksball og Femball
Og Fireball og Treball og Toball
Og Einball og Gubben og Gamla låg og drog
Og så fekk dei opp rota!
And then they got the root out!
Last edited by Aleco on 2012-12-31, 13:25, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby Saigheadair » 2012-12-30, 12:52

I really don't know what this rhyme is for, but we used it a lot when I was a child.

One, two, three
Asawa ni Marie
Araw-gabi
Walang panty!


One, two, three
The spouse of Marie
Morning and night
No panty/doesn't wear panties.

As an adult, this makes me think because Marie is a girl's name so the spouse should be a husband. Guys don't wear panties. Unless Marie is a man, then this would be making fun of Marie's wife. Or this might be some kind of lesbianism.
[flag]tl[/flag][flag]en[/flag][flag]nan[/flag]

RAiNfAll
Posts: 1
Joined: 2021-01-01, 9:33
Real Name: Rain Fall
Gender: female

Re: Childhood Rhymes

Postby RAiNfAll » 2021-01-01, 9:57

Where I live we have three I can remember at the moment, they're all clapping games


Mama, Mama, cant you see
Look what daddy's done to me
He took away my MP3
Now I'm watching Barney
Went to the doctor and the doctor said
Don't stop playing till your hands get red

Welcome to McDonalds, may I take your order
Knick knack tia tia
Icy cold milk shake
Put it in a apple pie
Sing it in a lullaby

I dont wanna go to Mexico no more more more
There's a big fat policeman at the door door door
He will take me by my collar, make me pay a dollar
I dont wanna go to Mexico no more more more

Reese's Pieces Buttercup,
you mess with me I mess you up
ba ba choo choo train,
watch that girl do her thing
she can't why not she can't why not
because her head hurts
her breasts too tight
Her booty shaking from left to right,
left right left right left right
You too skinny
You too fat
Watch that girl break her back say
Boom chickie, Boom chickie,
Boom chickie, Boom chickie

Apple on a stick
You make me sick
You make my heart go two forty six
Not because I'm dirty
Not because im clean
Not because I kissed a boy in a magazine
((There are two variations I know of this next part))
Hey girls wanna have some fun?
Here comes Jhonny with his pants undone
Close your eyes and count to ten
If you mess up you gotta marry him
OR
Hey Jhonny, wanna have a fight
Meet me at the carnival Saturday night
If you say (desired number) you're out of the game
So let's get ready for the choo choo train


These are all I remember lol


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