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Re: Idioms in your culture for a broken heart

Posted: 2017-10-26, 8:57
by Homine.Sardu
Strigo wrote:
darkina wrote:There's a lot of fish in the ocean... :headbang:
(what if I want that particular fish... ;))

Morto un Papa, se ne fa un altro
(when a Pope dies, a new one is elected - although this is not only used for lovers, but I've been told this a few times recently)


It reminds me of "A rey muerto, rey puesto" which means the same, but using kings, not Popes. :P


There is one similar in Sardinian :

Preìderu mortu, cadréa leàda = Dead priest, taken chair

(it means that when a priest dies, another takes his place)

Instead another proverb about new opportunities is :

Deus tàncat unu balcone e abérit una janna = God closes a window and opens a door

Re: Idioms in your culture for a broken heart

Posted: 2017-10-26, 16:26
by vijayjohn
In Malayalam, you have a broken liver, not a broken heart, because we generally talk about feeling emotions in the liver rather than the heart.

Re: Idioms in your culture for a broken heart

Posted: 2017-10-26, 17:40
by linguoboy
Homine.Sardu wrote:Deus tàncat unu balcone e abérit una janna = God closes a window and opens a door

It is odd seeing such a distinctively Catalan verb in a non-Catalan context.

Also balcone is one for the True False Friends thread.

Re: Idioms in your culture for a broken heart

Posted: 2017-10-26, 17:50
by Homine.Sardu
linguoboy wrote:
Homine.Sardu wrote:Deus tàncat unu balcone e abérit una janna = God closes a window and opens a door

It is odd seeing such a distinctively Catalan verb in a non-Catalan context.

Also balcone is one for the True False Friends thread.


It's used in all Sardinia I think, it could be a Catalan loanword; Sardinia was under Aragonese / Spanish government for nearly 300 years. The verb Tancare is interchangeable with Serrare; in the sentence above I could also use Serrare instead of Tancare. While Tancare in Sardinian is also a synonymous of "to enclose, to fence off".

Re: Idioms in your culture for a broken heart

Posted: 2017-10-26, 18:04
by linguoboy
Homine.Sardu wrote:It's used in all Sardinia I think, it could be a Catalan loanword; Sardinia was under Aragonese / Spanish government for nearly 300 years. The verb Tancare is interchangeable with Serrare; in the sentence above I could also use Serrare instead of Tancare. While Tancare in Sardinian is also a synonymous of "to enclose, to fence off".

Among major Romance languages, it's found only in Catalan and Occitan. Coromines reportedly traces it to a Celtic verbal root *tanco-, but I can't find that in my sources. If it is Celtic, that would make a Sardinian origin highly unlikely.