Scots

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Cymro
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Postby Cymro » 2007-04-18, 18:41

Scotland isn't independant :P

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Johanna
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Postby Johanna » 2007-04-18, 18:58

Nope, but it's a country within the UK and not a part of England, with a parliament of their own and all.
And I said just that about Yorkshire: "independent from England", not from the UK. ;)
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Purple Julie
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Postby Purple Julie » 2007-04-20, 6:05

Weel, ah'm no sayin' whit byleid ah'm screiven the noo, ah'll wait tae see if onyone else has a guess. Ah hink ah'm screiven richt accordin' tae the byleid ah ken, apart frae the inglis words ah'm puttin' in.

Noo, ah wullnae gie ye ma essay because ah dinna like tae dae thae kain' o things o'er the internet. A dinna want it tae be misused. But ah can gie the wabsteids ah lookit at.
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Aleco
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Postby Aleco » 2007-04-22, 7:29

It looks like you've managed to make an ortography for Scots? :? Why can't you make a course then? Even though it isn't an official language itself, I like the prouncation :D

Det ser ut som dere har klart å lage en ortografi til skotsk? :? Hvorfor kan dere ikke lage et kurs da? Selv om det ikke et godkjent spårk i seg selv, liker jeg uttalen :D
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Purple Julie
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Postby Purple Julie » 2007-04-22, 12:05

Naw, Aleco, thar isnae a proper orthography for Scots. Thar isnae a staunart, sae a'body screives it differently, an' ah'm makkin it up as ah go an aw!

Scots has been screiven in literature for a lang time.

But ah hink that thar ur some coorses in the Scots leid in Scotland. Ah dinna hink they are like degree coorses though.
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Benjamin
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Postby Benjamin » 2007-04-22, 12:54

I find it sad that ''Scots'' has more speakers than Gaelic, and Gaelic is a proper language which Scots isn't. :?

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Aleco
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Postby Aleco » 2007-04-22, 19:54

Too bad :(

Synd :(
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DoOr
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Postby DoOr » 2007-05-25, 17:11

is Doric easy to learn? i recently visited Aberdeen and Inverness and i found the language fascinating although i couln't read a single word!

Is these anything common between Doric and Gaelic?
Λανθανουσα γλωτταν αληθειας λεγει

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nighean-neonach
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Postby nighean-neonach » 2007-05-25, 18:19

Is Scots also spoken by Gàidhlig speakers, and vice versa?


Usually, no. But I have yet to meet anyone who speaks Gaelic AND Scots. Native Gaelic speakers are usually bilingual with standard English only.


Wasn't there a politician who has recently spoken his oath in English, Gaelic, and Scots? Don't remember who it was, I think it was after the recent election.
I do know some people who, due to their family situation, have grown up with Gaelic and Scots.

Gormur wrote:And last bu not least, where could a person hear Scots online?


Sometimes on Scottish BBC online radio, but don't ask me for details, sorry.
Writing poetry in: Scottish Gaelic, German, English.
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lyric
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Words of encouragement

Postby lyric » 2007-06-06, 14:03

Hello Scoats speakers,

Your help is needed to complete the list of words of encouragement: http://home.unilang.org/wiki3/index.php ... ouragement

i.e. words you say to yourself or others when trying to accomplish a hard task,
like for example learning a new language :wink:.

Examples: "You can make it.", "Go-ahead! ", "Go!"

How do you say in Scoats?

(When possible in original script and English transcript)

Thanks,
Lyric

2345Q434
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Scots wirds o encouragement...

Postby 2345Q434 » 2007-06-11, 23:18

"Hae faith in yersel an ye can dae it!" Would be one way you could put it.

Akita7
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Urgent help with translation.

Postby Akita7 » 2007-06-14, 10:40

:D Hello to everyone,

Its my first posting and I need desperately to find the meaning of song lyrics. I love the track and so did my mum.

Tighinn Air A'Mhuir Am Fear Phosas Mi. (Song title).

We don't know what it means but it didn't stop her enjoyment of the music.

I need to play it at her funeral tomorrow and need to know that it is fitting.

Appreciate any help.

Thanks for your help.

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Bombuzal
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Small Scots Wordlist, with norse/germanic+English

Postby Bombuzal » 2007-07-08, 10:40

Hey everyone :)

I'm compiling a small list of words with translation in English as well as possible root words from other Germanic languages (where applicable), it's hosted Here but I'll re-post the finished product on the forum when it's done ;)

Code: Select all

Scots      ->   Norse/Germanic      ->   English

keek      ->   kikke(n)      ->   look
ken      ->   kennen         ->   know
dook      ->            ->   bathe/duck
plouk      ->            ->   pimple/spot
puggled      ->            ->   exhausted/knackered
crabbit      ->            ->   ill-tempered
howff      ->            ->   haunt/meeting-place/regular
glieket      ->            ->   daft/stupid/gormless
muckle      ->            ->   great/big/mighty
guff      ->            ->   crap or unpleasent smell
ben      ->            ->   in/towards (eg. to a room in the house)   
hoor      ->            ->   Whore
Midden      ->            ->   Like a tip/mess, slag (human or otherwise)
naebuddy   ->            ->   nobody
radge      ->            ->   mad, furous; mental person
baffies      ->            ->   slippers
hae      ->            ->   have
napper      ->            ->   head
nicht      ->            ->   night
feert      ->            ->   afraid
blaw      ->            ->   blow
peenie      ->            ->   apron
gan      ->            ->   go
een      ->            ->   eyes
dee      ->            ->   die
erse      ->            ->   Arse (from "irish")
foosty      ->            ->   mouldy, musty
baith      ->            ->   both
craw      ->            ->   Crow
brae      ->            ->   road on a hill
sook      ->            ->   suck
doon      ->            ->   down
breeks      ->            ->   Trousers
wifie      ->            ->   woman, usually aging
heid      ->            ->   head
poke      ->            ->   bag
drookit      ->            ->   drenched, soaked
dicht      ->            ->   wipe
heifer      ->            ->    cow/big woman
jobie      ->            ->   turd/shit
bogie      ->            ->   snot/mucus
bairn      ->            ->   child
braw      ->   bra         ->   fine, nice
kirk      ->   kirk         ->   church
seek      ->   ziek(nl)      ->   sick
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DelBoy
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Postby DelBoy » 2007-07-08, 12:05

A couple of them aren't from Norse origin I think...
I would guess that breeks (or britches in English) comes from the Irish (and Scots Gaelic?) 'bríste', meaning trousers.
'heifer' looks like an insult, using the English word 'heifer' meaning a female cow (we use that one in Ireland too)
'braw' looks like it could come from the Irish (and Gaelic?) 'breá', meaning 'fine', 'excellent'
The British Isles are awesome - I know, I live there - but Ireland is not a part of them. K thnx bai!

Labharfainn níos mó faoi, dá dtuigfinn an bhrí...

Condraz23
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Postby Condraz23 » 2007-07-08, 13:09

This seems like an Irish Gaelic song to me because none of the lyrics resemble Ulster Scots. I think you should post this thread in the Irish Gaelic forum.

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Bombuzal
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Postby Bombuzal » 2007-07-08, 16:22

Yeah, not all are from norse - the norse words will only appear "where applicable" :)

And yes, Braw could come from the Gaelic or the Norse :]

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Johanna
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Postby Johanna » 2007-07-09, 22:18

DelBoy wrote:'braw' looks like it could come from the Irish (and Gaelic?) 'breá', meaning 'fine', 'excellent'

'bra' means 'good' in Swedish so that word could indeed come from either Norse or Irish. Might even be the same word (ok, now someone who knows this better than I do will probably say I'm totally wrong :P) at least I've only seen it in the North Germanic languages (and Irish but I don't know that language) and especially Danish had a lot of contact with Irish 1000 years ago. And as everyone knows Danish, Swedish and Norwegian are very close and back then even more so.
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Re: Small Scots Wordlist, with norse/germanic+English

Postby Aleco » 2007-07-23, 21:39

Code: Select all

Scots      ->   Norse/Germanic      ->   English

keek      ->   kikke              ->   look
ken      ->   kjenne         ->   know
dook      ->   dukke         ->   bathe/duck
plouk      ->   kvise         ->   pimple/spot
puggled      ->   utslitt         ->   exhausted/knackered
crabbit      ->   ***         ->   ill-tempered
howff      ->   jakt         ->   haunt/meeting-place/regular
glieket      ->   dust         ->   daft/stupid/gormless
muckle      ->   stor         ->   great/big/mighty
guff      ->   guffe*         ->   crap or unpleasent smell
ben      ->   mot         ->   in/towards (eg. to a room in the house)   
hoor      ->   ludder         ->   Whore
Midden      ->   ***         ->   Like a tip/mess, slag (human or otherwise)
naebuddy   ->   ingen         ->   nobody
radge      ->   rasende         ->   mad, furous; mental person
baffies      ->   tøfler         ->   slippers
hae      ->   ha         ->   have
napper      ->   hode         ->   head
nicht      ->   natt         ->   night
feert      ->   redd         ->   afraid
blaw      ->   blåse         ->   blow
peenie      ->   forkle         ->   apron
gan      ->   gå         ->   go
een      ->   øyne         ->   eyes
dee      ->   dø         ->   die
erse      ->   ræv         ->   Arse (from "irish")
foosty      ->   muggen         ->   mouldy, musty
baith      ->   både         ->   both
craw      ->   kråke         ->   Crow
brae      ->   ***         ->   road on a hill
sook      ->   suge         ->   suck
doon      ->   ned         ->   down
breeks      ->   bukser         ->   Trousers
wifie      ->   kjerring      ->   woman, usually aging
heid      ->   hode         ->   head
poke      ->   pose         ->   bag
drookit      ->   dyvåt         ->   drenched, soaked
dicht      ->   tørkle         ->   wipe
heifer      ->   ku         ->    cow/big woman
jobie      ->   lort         ->   turd/shit
bogie      ->   buse          ->   snot/mucus
bairn      ->   barn          ->   child
braw      ->   bra         ->   fine, nice
kirk      ->   kirke         ->   church
seek      ->   syk/sjuk      ->   sick


This is all the Norwegian translations...

*** = To tired to come up with a good transaltion
* = 'guffe' is something creepy or disgusting
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neoni
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Postby neoni » 2007-08-15, 0:43

it's scottish gaelic, it means "coming over the ocean (is) the man i will marry"

be careful about mixing up scots and gaidhlig :P

deardron
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Postby deardron » 2007-08-20, 10:51

Gormur wrote:Is this Scots, rather than Scots Gaelic?

Dat is Shaetlan Scots fir sure. Tanks fir da link, hit was nice tae listen tae :D

charlotteh wrote:And I have a vague recollection of someone saying that Gaelic WAS spoken for a time in Shetland/Orkney. But I can't remember for sure and I don't have any of my lecture notes with me! (Plus the lectures were in Gaelic so my understanding of them may not have been 100% accurate).

Gaelic was allegedly spoken in Orkney when Scottish counts took it over. However, the language has never made it into Shetland. Just was reading about it 1-2 weeks ago, but can't find a link :cry:

The Orkneyjar website claims though that Orcadians have never used Gaelic:
http://www.orkneyjar.com/orkney/faq.htm


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