Scots

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ceid donn
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Postby ceid donn » 2008-03-01, 5:56

I used to work in a guitar store here in the States and one of our regulars was a guy from Paisley who'd come in twice a week for lessons. He and I got along famously, and he'd stick around after his lesson and chat with me in Scots. We'd joke around a lot (Scots is a wicked language for humor!) and sometimes he'd start yelling at me in Scots, often to the alarm of other customers - all in good fun, of course. LOL. I learned to understand Scots rather quickly that way. Strange, but true.

Really, the key is simply to be open and not defensive or intimidated. :wink:

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neoni
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Postby neoni » 2008-04-04, 10:51

both are norse names

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neoni
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Postby neoni » 2008-04-04, 10:52

APOLOGIES TO THE SCOTS FORUM FOR THE OVERFLOW OF TRANSLATION REQUESTS.


WITH LOVE,
SCOTTISH GAELIC.

deardron
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Postby deardron » 2008-04-24, 11:56

Re Gaelic in Orkney, as professor W.J.Watson asserted, Gaelic was spoken by the earls of Angus and Strathearns line which succeeded the Norse line of earls and ruled Orkney in the XIII-XIV centuries. Hugh Marwick quotes Watson in his "Orkney Norn" (1929):

There can be no doubt that in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries the language of Strathearn was Gaelic and that the Earls and other nobles must have used Gaelic to their people. ... Their servants, male and female, would be Gaelic-speaking. The rennarius, latinized from the G.[aelic] rannaire, 'divider', 'carver', perhaps 'head butler', appears several times as witness to the Earl's charters in the thirteenth century. The Earls of Strathearn were certainly brought up in a thoroughly Gaelic atmosphere. The same applies to Angus of that period.
(Hugh Marwick, "Orkney Norn", p. XX)

llionesicu
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how to say, "today is our day" ,in scottish gaelic

Postby llionesicu » 2008-05-12, 6:50

how to say , "today is our day" , in scottish , is for a tattoo

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nighean-neonach
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Postby nighean-neonach » 2008-05-12, 8:01

In Scots, or in Gaelic? ^^
Writing poetry in: Scottish Gaelic, German, English.
Reading poetry in: Latin, Old Irish, French, Ancient Greek, Old Norse.
Talking to people in the shop in: Lithuanian, Norwegian, Irish Gaelic, Saami.
Listening to people talking in the shop in: Icelandic, Greenlandic, Finnish.

llionesicu
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Postby llionesicu » 2008-05-21, 22:29

in the gaelic spoken in scotland

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Johanna
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Postby Johanna » 2008-05-22, 11:51

Then you're in the wrong forum, Scots is a Germanic language closely related to English.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scots_language


On the other hand, not only Gaelic speaker s emigrated from Scotland to North America, there were a fair deal of Scots speakers as well. And a tattoo in Scots is far more original and unique than one in Gaelic ;)
Swedish (sv) native; English (en) good; Norwegian (no) read fluently, understand well, speak badly; Danish (dk) read fluently, understand badly, can't speak; Faroese (fo) read some, understand a bit, speak a few sentences; German (de) French (fr) Spanish (es) forgetting; heritage language, want to understand and speak but can't.

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neoni
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Postby neoni » 2008-06-04, 9:40

unfortunately, it's just as stupid

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Eoghan
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Postby Eoghan » 2008-06-12, 19:41

I would probably say something similar - or

"'Tis chase the sunset wi' ye Ah wid"

Rakel Piersson
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Re: Pronounciation question

Postby Rakel Piersson » 2008-07-01, 12:38

Farenhajt wrote:Hi guys,

Can someone please tell me how to pronounce "Auchleuchries"? And what it is exactly - a city, a village, something else?

Thanks :)


I'm a lowland Scot, and had never heard of that word, but suspected it to be a place name going by how it sounded. Google confirms that it's an estate in Aberdeenshire. Going by how the similarly-named quintessential Scottish town of 'Auchtermuchty' in Fife is verbalised, I'd suggest that the correct pronunciation is with three syllables, 'Uch-Loch-Ries', with the 'ch' sounds being the same as the way a Scot would pronounce the 'ch' in 'loch' (i.e., not like the English pronunciation of 'lock'). Another example of the correct sound that most English-speakers would be familiar with is the sound that most English speakers imitating a Scots accent would make if they said "och aye the noo!").

Hope that helps!

MacRae Fortitudine
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Can anyone translate something into scottish Gaelic for me?x

Postby MacRae Fortitudine » 2008-07-13, 19:22

Hi all,

I wondered if anyone can translate

Big sister
The Love, The Life, The Laughter

AND

Little sister
The Love, The Life, The laughter

Into scottish Gaelic for a tattoo please? xx

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j0nas
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Postby j0nas » 2008-07-13, 20:08

this is the scots forum
you fail

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neoni
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Postby neoni » 2008-07-13, 22:08

gaelic doesn't have a word for sister, can't be translated sorry.
Image

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Eoghan
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Postby Eoghan » 2008-07-14, 7:26

Ach a Neoni, tha piuthar agam... :lol: tha thu cho chraobhaidh, mobhathathatha (Mowahahahahaha).
Image[flag=]sv[/flag] [flag=]en[/flag] [flag=]gd[/flag] [flag=]de[/flag][flag=]ga[/flag] [flag=]fr[/flag] [flag=]pt[/flag] [flag=]nl[/flag] [flag=]it[/flag] [flag=]no-nn[/flag] [flag=]fo[/flag]

Albeit the Scot in me is of the Western stock and the red of the Cairngorms, the heather and the Lewissian gneiss, the Viking in me was there when you uttered the first word of your leid.

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neoni
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Re: Scots discussion

Postby neoni » 2008-09-27, 21:52

i moved to aberdeen last week

doric is wierd man :shock:
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Galloglaich
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Re: Scots discussion

Postby Galloglaich » 2008-11-04, 16:44

Now Doric is something I've heard a lot of. You can usually get the basics of what people are saying, but not the details. And it is embarassing when asking for things like directions, when you keep having to say 'fit' (I don't really like sounding like a tourist when I'm...well, okay, I am a tourist but still :) ) and thinking you sound stupid.
'Ascot is a racecourse in England; a gale is a drying wind.'

mcruic
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Re: Basic Scots that you need to know!

Postby mcruic » 2008-11-29, 8:06

Ye ken whit? Ye dinnae raelly want tae be haein Scoats lessons online. Whit ye'll find is that naebdie speaks like that, no onie mair oniewey. You try tae come here tae Scotland wi yer online vocabulary, and fowk'll just staun an look at ye an wonder whit ye're tryin tae say. Maist o the Scoats ye find online is literary. Fir example, NAEBDIE A ken says "leid" fir language, and I wis born and bidit in Scotland fir 26 years. Nooadays, Scoats hus goat closer an closer tae English, but it's till recognisable as no bein English, no in its ordinary sense oniewey.

For Mezzo

"dae ye know where A kan find Scoats lessons? "

Depends whaur in Scotland ye come fae:

In Glasgow, at least, fowk say 'know', but in ither parts of Scotland, they say 'ken'.

"D'ye ken whaur A can find" would be better in ma opinion, "can" bein pronoonced like "kn" wi no much o a vowel in the middle, and 'Dae ye' becomin 'D'ye' as in English in rapid speech.

Galloglaich
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Re: Basic Scots that you need to know!

Postby Galloglaich » 2008-12-01, 20:15

it really looks like english but i am afraid of pronunciation


And you should be afraid. You should be very afraid :D

Pronounciation is irregular, sort of, but when you have a feel for it you can imitate how a native Scots-speaker would say it. Usually they'd understand you if you don't say it right anyway.
I know, I checked, and spoke as if speaking German. They knew what I was saying, although I know that it sounded absolutely nonsensical.

It was intentional :whistle:
'Ascot is a racecourse in England; a gale is a drying wind.'

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Supreemio
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Re: Basic Scots that you need to know!

Postby Supreemio » 2008-12-02, 20:49

Is there any Scots speaking areas in Scotland ?


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