Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

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Karavinka
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Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

Postby Karavinka » 2008-10-09, 11:39

Mr. Cathayan! is a Medieval Korean textbook for the vernacular languages of the Far East. Comparable to our "Teach Yourself", the text focuses heavily on the acquisition of spoken language. This is 1680 Manchu language edition of the text. It is made of eight volumes of phrasebook.

The original text was taken from 中華民國滿族協會. Since the materials themselves are old enough, I do not see problem uploading them. The original text is Early Mandarin (Haner) - Manchu bilingual, and English translation and word annotation are mine.

I DO NOT SPEAK MANCHU. I'm relying on a grammatical summary, a partial Mr. Cathayan! wordlist and the Chinese translation. Feel free to use this material, but at your risk!


Mr. Cathayan! Book I
淸語老乞大卷一

1.
大阿哥你從那裡來的?
Amba age si aibici jihe?
Big Brother, where did you come from?

Amba: Big
Age: Brother
Si: You (2nd person sg.)
Aibi: Where
Ci: ~from
Jihe: Came. inf: Jimbi.

2.
我從朝鮮王京來的.
Bi coohiyan wang ging ci jihe.
I come from Wanggyeong, Korea.

Bi: I (1st sg.)
Coohiyan: Korea
Wang Ging: Wanggyeong. Modern-day Kaesong.
Ci: ~from
Jihe: Came.

3.
如今往那裡去?
te absi genembi ?
"Whither do you go now?"

Te: Now
Absi: Whither
Genembi: To go

4.
我往京城去.
bi gemun hecen i baru genembi.
I go to the place of Beijing.

Bi: I
Gemun Hecen: Beijing.
i: Genitive suffix
Ba: Place
Genmmbi: to go

5.
你幾時從王京起程的?
si atanggi wang ging ci juraka?
When did you leave from Wanggyeong?

Si: You
Atanggi: When
Wang Ging: Wanggyeong
Ci: ~from
Juraka: To leave. inf: Jurambi.

6.
我在本月初一日起程的。
bi ere biyai ice de juraka.
I left on the first of this month.

Bi: I
Ere: This
Biya: Month
-i: Genitive suffix
Ice: First day
De: At
Juraka: To leave. inf: Jurambi.

7.
你既是在本月一日起程的,到現在差不多半個月,為何纔到這裡呢?
si ere biyai ice de jurafi, te hontohon biya hamika bime ainu teni ubade isinjiha?
You left at the first day of this month, it is nearly half a month and why are you still here?

Si: You
Ere: This
Biya: Month
-i: Genitive suffix
Ice: First day
De: At
Jura-: To leave. inf: Jurambi
-fi: Verbal connector

Te: Now
Hontohon: Half
Hamika: To near. inf: Hamimbi
Bime: Be (at a place). inf: Bimbi
Ainu: Why
Teni: Just
Uba: Here
De: At
Isinjiha: To reach. inf: Isinjimbi

8.
因為有一個伙伴落後了來,我慢慢走著等候,所以來遲了。
emu gucu tutafi jime ofi, bi elhe Seme aliyakiyame yabure jakade tuttu jime goidaha.
Since I have a friend who was late. I wanted to wate for him, and because of it I come with delay.

Emu: One
Gucu: Friend
Tuta-: to be left behind. inf: Tutambi
-fi: connector
Jime: Came. inf: Jimbi
Ofi: because

Elhe: slow, slowly
Seme: connector after adverb
Aliyakiyame: wanted to wait. Aliyambi "To wait" + -ki- desire
Yabure: To go, to work/execute. inf: Yabumbi
Jakade: Because
Tuttu: So
Goihada: to be long. inf: Goidambi

9.
那個伙伴現在趕到了嗎?
tere gucu te amcame isinjimbio akUn?
Is that friend now reaching here or now?

Tere: That
Gucu: Friend
Te: Now
Amcame: To reach. inf: Amcambi
Isinjimbi: To come
-o question
AkUn: "or not?"

10.
這個伙伴便是,昨天纔到的。
ere uthai tere gucu inu, sikse teni jihe.
"Just now, that friend also came yesterday."

Ere: This
Uthai: Immediately
Tere: That
Gucu: Friend
Inu: Also
Sikse: Yesterday
Teni: Just
Jihe: Came

11.
你計算本月底能到京城嗎?
si bodoci ere biyai manashUn gemun hecen de isinambio isinarakUn?
Do you count on reaching Beijing within this month or not?

Bodoci: count on
ere biyai: this month
manashUn: within
Gemun Hecen: Beijing
de: accusative particle
isinambi: to reach
-o: question
isinarakUn: can't reach

12.
我怎麼得知,若上天憐憫身體安好時,想是可到吧!
bi adarame bahafi sambi? abka gosifi beye elhe oci isinambi dere.
How can I know? Heaven loves us safe, then we'll get there.

Adraame: how
bahafi: get
sambi: know

abka: sky
gosifi: love
beye: self
elhe: slow, safe, peace
oci: nom. particle
isinambi: to reach
dere: there

13.
你是朝鮮人,又有什麼空閒把漢語學的相當好呢?
si coohiyan i niyalma kai, geli ai Solo de nikan i gisun be mujakU sain i taciha?
You are a Korean, wouldn't it be really good to learn Chinese in your time as well?

Si: You
Coohiyan: Korea
i: possesive
niyalma: person
kai: emphasis particle

gemi: more
ai: what
solo: (extra) time, space
de: particle in/at
nikan i gisun: Chinese language
be: accusative particle
mujakU: really
sain: good
taciha: learn

14.
我原來跟漢人讀書,因此會一點漢語。
bi daci nikan i niyalma de bithe taciha be dahame, nikan i gisun be majige bahanambi.
I originally learned books with Chinese person, I can speak some Chinese.

daci: originally
nikan i niyalma: Chinese person
bithe: book
taciha: learning
dahame: followed

nikan i gisun: Chinese language
majige: a little bit
bahanambi: possible, can

15.
你跟誰讀書的?
si wede bithe taciha?
With whom did you learn books?

We: who
Wede: with wom
bithe: book
taciha: learned

16.
我在漢學堂裡讀書的。
bi nikan i tacikU de bithe taciha.
I learned to read at Chinese school.

nikan: China, Chinese
tacikU: school

17.
你讀的是那類書呢?
si ai jergi bithe be taciha?
What kind of book did you read?

Jergi: kind.

18.
我讀的是論語、孟子、小學的書。
bi leolen gisuren mengdzi ajigan tacin i bithe be taciha.
I learned Analects of Confucius, Mencius, and Small Learning.

Leolen Gisuren: Analects of Confucius
Mengdzi: Mencius
Ajigan Tacin: Small Learning

19.
你每天做什麼功課? si inenggidari aibe kicembi?
What did you study everyday?

Inenggi: Day
Inenggidari: Each day
Ai: What
Aibe: What (as an object)
Kicembi: Study

20.
每天清早起來到學校裡跟老師讀書,
inenggidari gersi fersi de ilifi tacikU de genefi sefu de bithe tacimbi,
Each day I got up early in the morning, went to school and read with the teacher.

放學到家裡吃完飯後就到學校裡去寫字,
tacikU ci facame boode jifi buda jeme wajiha manggi,
we leave school to finish eating at hoome and after

在師傅面前講書。
uthai tacikU de genefi bithe arame sefui juleri bithe be giyangnambi.
come back to school and recite books in front of the teacher.

Gersi fersi: early morning
ili: get up inf: ilimbi
tacikU: school
gene: to go inf: genembi
sefu: teacher

faca: to scatter. inf: facambi
boode: at home
ji: came. inf: jimbi
buda: food
jeme: ate. inf: jembi
wajiha: finished. inf: wajimbi.
manggi: after

uthai: then
arambi: do
juleri: front
giyangnambi: to recite
Last edited by Karavinka on 2008-10-13, 4:43, edited 3 times in total.
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kalemiye
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Re: Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

Postby kalemiye » 2008-10-10, 18:55

Thanks for posting, I always wondered what Manchu was like! :D
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Re: Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

Postby Karavinka » 2008-10-13, 5:20

21.
講什麼書?
ai bithe be giyangnambi?
What books do you recite?

ai: what
bithe: book
de: object particle
giyangnambi: recite, teach

22.
講論語、孟子、小學的書。
leolen gisuren mengdzi ajigan tacin i bithe be giyangnamgbi.
We recite books of Analects, Mencius, and Small Learning

23.
講完書又做什麼功課?
bithe giyangname wajifi jai aibe kicembi?
Finish reading books, then what do you do?

Jai: then

24.
到晚間在師傅面前抽籤背書,
yamji oho manggi, sefui juleri sibiya tatafi bithe Sejilembi,
When it's already evening, we draw lots in front of teacher and recite books (from memory)

Yamji: evening
oho: already
manggi: after
sibiya tatambi: draw lots
sejilembi: to recite (from memory)

若能背時,師傅給一張免帖,
Sejileme mutehengge oci sefu guwebure bithe emke be bumbi,
If well recited, teacher gives one leave note

mutehengge: well
gewebure: to let go. inf: gewebumbi
emke: one (of things)
bumbi: give

若是不能背時,管理的生員叫他臥倒打三板。
aika Sejileme muterakU oci, kadalara Susai tere be dedubufi ilan moo tantambi.
If badly recited, he calls supervisors, lays him and hits three times with wood.

aika: if
muterakU: not well
kadalara: managerial. inf: kadalambi
susai* (dictionary only gives "fifty", but I assume it is either 生員 or 叫.)
tere be: "him"
dedubumbi: to lay
ilan: three
moo: three
tantambi: to hit

25.
抽籤背書怎麼給免帖?
sibiya tatafi bithe Sejilere, guwebure bithe burengge adarame?
To draw lots and reciting books, how it gives leave note?

burengge: to give. inf. bumbi.


----------------------------------
Not much at the moment, will come back later.

renata wrote:Thanks for posting, I always wondered what Manchu was like! :D


Thanks.
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lishaoxuan
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Re: Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

Postby lishaoxuan » 2008-11-07, 19:59

I really wonder how Manchu sounds like.
And your phrase book makes me really want to learn its alphabet.

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Re: Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2009-11-08, 8:11

Hey Karavinka! I would love it if you could post more of these sentences, if you have more. :D
I've recently become very interested in Mongolian (if you'd care to know why, I could tell :P ), and today have read about Manchu, and also love it. :mrgreen: I have noticed quite a few similarities in grammar, and a few in lexemes, like:

Mongolian: bi/ter/ene
Manchu: bi/tere/ere

Anyways, these sentences and glosses are really cool, and I'd love to have more, particularly more complex ones, as examples. 8-) I really want to learn Mongolian, and perhaps Manchu in the future. :partyhat: I have a Manchu - English lexicon with like 20,000 entries, and a 600 page grammar in English, both in PDF form, that I could send to you if you don't have them. :wink:


Also, in sentence 4, "baru" is a postposition meaning "to, towards". ;)
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Re: Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

Postby Karavinka » 2009-11-10, 3:26

Sean of the Dead wrote:Hey Karavinka! I would love it if you could post more of these sentences, if you have more. :D
I've recently become very interested in Mongolian (if you'd care to know why, I could tell :P ), and today have read about Manchu, and also love it. :mrgreen: I have noticed quite a few similarities in grammar, and a few in lexemes, like:

Mongolian: bi/ter/ene
Manchu: bi/tere/ere

Anyways, these sentences and glosses are really cool, and I'd love to have more, particularly more complex ones, as examples. 8-) I really want to learn Mongolian, and perhaps Manchu in the future. :partyhat: I have a Manchu - English lexicon with like 20,000 entries, and a 600 page grammar in English, both in PDF form, that I could send to you if you don't have them. :wink:


Also, in sentence 4, "baru" is a postposition meaning "to, towards". ;)


I have, and I could work on more of this, only that I am occupied with other things.

Good luck doing anything Mongolian through English medium, because I doubt you could go very far unless you are literate in Japanese or Chinese already. Same goes with Manchu, except that it's even worse and knowing either Japanese or Chinese is a must before you start anything Manchu. (You might have noticed that I was deciphering Manchu above out of the Early Mandarin translation.)
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Re: Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2009-11-10, 3:50

Actually, I have:

-Modern Mongolian: A Course-Book by John Gaunt, 269 pages, pretty good quality, but it won't be my main book of study
-Grammar of the Mongol Language by Chinggaltai, 175 pages, so-so, but I doubt I'll ever use it, since in a week or so I'll have a much better and more detailed grammar
-Phonology of Mongolian by 4 people, 335 pages, awesome book on pronunciation and evolution of sounds
-Mongolian Grammar by Dandii-Yadamyn, and Rita Kullmann Tserenpil, 470 pages, will soon become the standard reference grammar in English :wink:
-Colloquial Mongolian by Alan J.K. Sanders and Jantsangiyn Bat-Ireedui, 352 pages, great quality; tons taught, has audio
-Modern Mongolian by James E. Bosson, 256 pages, don't know much about it, but reviews say it's great
-http://www.bolor-toli.com/ as a dictionary

Let's see, grammar, check, dictionary, check, course books, check. All I need is someone that speaks it fluently, but I'm not worried about that yet. :P

For Manchu:

-Manchu Grammar by Liliya M. Gorelova, 625 pages, very in depth, covers a lot, if not most of the languages grammar
-Manchu - English Lexicon by Jerry Norman, 337 pages, 20,000 entries in one direction
-Chrestomathie Mandchou by J. Klaproth, 312 pages, filled with tons of old Manchu texts 8-)
-Manchu Grammar with Analysed Texts by P. G. von Möllendorff, 71 pages, the grammar isn't worth much, it's really the glossed texts the book is about. :wink:


So, actually I do have enough to learn both, although Manchu isn't nearly as alive and kicking as Mongolian, it still has quite a few materials in English, because of the revitalization of it. There's a Chinese forum for Manchu that has quite a few people that are learning it or already speak it pretty well, and even though I don't speak Chinese, Manchu can be a lingua franca between me and them. :wink:

Again, I'd love it if you could post more sentences, if/when you have the time that is. :D

Thanks for your words of encouragement though. :ohwell:
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Re: Mr. Cathayan! Manchu Edition

Postby Karavinka » 2009-11-10, 4:06

Sure, good luck. (I have seen those circulating online as well.)
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