Azeri Greetings

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kalemiye
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Azeri Greetings

Postby kalemiye » 2009-01-26, 18:47

كلدك = you wrote this like in Ottoman Turkish or is it written like this in Azeri too?
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Re: Poll: Azərbaycanca vs. Azərbaycan dili

Postby zhiguli » 2009-01-27, 3:29

ups, you're right...i guess it should be گلدین.

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Re: Poll: Azərbaycanca vs. Azərbaycan dili

Postby coyote_k13 » 2009-01-27, 21:59

"خوش گلیپسیز" یا "خوش گلمیسیز"
this is the way we say hoş geldiniz in آذری in Tabriz
And thank you :)
دلتنگی های آدمی را باد به ترانه ای می خواند

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Re: Poll: Azərbaycanca vs. Azərbaycan dili

Postby coyote_k13 » 2009-01-28, 13:04

Dear Eskandar,

I like the new titles, in my opinion they suit the language better 8-).

گلمک in آذری (gelmek in Turkish) means to come. Hoş in Turkish means fine or good. In Azeri it changes to خوش, with strong h, like Spanish J, which we usually write like X when writing in Latin script.

The difference between Turkish and Azeri in this expression is in the way of using miş'li geçmiş for different pronouns.
Generally in Turkish and Azeri miş'li geçmiş zaman (meaning roughly past by using -miş), is used.

Di'li geçmiş is playing the role of simple past in English but miş'li geçmiş in Turkish is some thing like present perfect and it is used to tell stories or things you have heard or known but without having a first hand knowledge. In Azeri it is used simply as present perfect.

:arrow: I think my explanation was a bit difficult to understand, so I write the following table to help you understanding it:

Turkish----------------Azeri---------------------English
gelmişim-------------gelmişem----------------I have come
gelmişsin-------------gelmisen/gelipsen------you have come (singular)
gelmiş----------------gelip----------------------he/she has come
gelmişiz--------------gelmişux-----------------we have come
gelmişsiniz-----------gelmisiz/gelipsiz-------you have come (plural)
gelmişler--------------gelipler------------------they have come

آذری
گلمیشم
گلمیسیز/گلیپسیز
گلیپلر
گلمیشوخ
گلمیسیز/گلیپسیز
گلیپلر


The difference between Turkish and Azeri in this expression, is they way of using pronoun you (second person of plural). To say in Turkish you have come, it is said same way gelmişsiniz is being used; but in Azeri it is said this way: گلمیسیز("gelmisiz") is.

Pay attention to "siniz" in Turkish and "siz" in Azeri.

In addition to that there are some other ways of saying welcome in Azeri for example using simple past, خوش گلدیز this is called dili geçmiş in Azeri which has the same difference with Turkish on pronoun hoş geldiniz.
دلتنگی های آدمی را باد به ترانه ای می خواند

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Re: "Welcome" in Azeri

Postby eskandar » 2009-01-29, 16:14

Great post coyote_k13, thanks for the lesson! (By the way, I think you have a typo in your chart where you list the Perso-Arabic spellings; the first گلیپلر should be just گلیپ, right?)

To thank you properly, how do you say دستتان درد نکند / eline sağlık in Azeri? I think in Baku dialect they say əlləriniz ağrımasın, and in Tabriz just əliniz ağrımasın. Is that correct? How would it be spelled in the fars əlifbası (Perso-Arabic script) ?
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Re: Azeri Greetings

Postby kalemiye » 2009-01-29, 18:03

Since this is about greetings, I am going to post the few useful words I know how to write in Perso-Arabic script. All those I know come from Persian, but are used in Tabrizi Azeri all the time.

سلام = Salaam = Hello
مرسی = Mersi = Thank you
خدا حافظ= Xoda hafez = bye.
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Re: "Welcome" in Azeri

Postby coyote_k13 » 2009-01-30, 15:07

eskandar wrote:Great post coyote_k13, thanks for the lesson! (By the way, I think you have a typo in your chart where you list the Perso-Arabic spellings; the first گلیپلر should be just گلیپ, right?)

To thank you properly, how do you say دستتان درد نکند / eline sağlık in Azeri? I think in Baku dialect they say əlləriniz ağrımasın, and in Tabriz just əliniz ağrımasın. Is that correct? How would it be spelled in the fars əlifbası (Perso-Arabic script) ?


You guessed some sort of right Eskandar, in Tabriz we say əlləriz ağrımasın, which is اللریز آغریماسین in Perso-Arabic Script. Again Pay attention to pronouns;).
دلتنگی های آدمی را باد به ترانه ای می خواند

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Re: Azeri Greetings

Postby Francofinch » 2011-08-24, 10:45

have found that like most cultures in the area, Azeris like warm and friendly greetings.
o Men greet each other with a handshake, a kiss on the cheek and "salaam" (literally 'peace' but meaning 'hello').
o Women hug and kiss each other once on the left cheek. Azeri women do not generally shake hands among themselves, although many will shake hands with a foreigner.
o Males should wait and see if a woman extends her hand (although most will the more religious may not) - if they do shake it lightly.
o Always take a moment to ask about family, health and business.
o First names are generally used in social situations if the speakers are of similar ages.
o If you do not know the person well, use their first name followed by an appropriate title. For women, use "hanum" ("woman"). For men, use "bey" ("Mr").
o Younger people always initiate greetings with older people.
Last edited by Francofinch on 2012-06-18, 6:28, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Azeri Greetings

Postby kalemiye » 2011-08-24, 13:03

Nice post! :) Its sums up nicely how people greet each other in Azerbaijan. I only see few differences with the customs of Azerbaijanis in Iran.

Women hug and kiss each other once on the left cheek.


In Iran they kiss each other 3 times.

Azeri women do not generally shake hands among themselves, although many will shake hands with a foreigner.


AFAIK, they don't kiss with people they don't know and shake hands instead, it is considered as a more formal greeting. The first time I went there everybody shook my hand, but now we greet each other kissing each other.

I think behind it there is also the idea that in many Western countries people don't kiss each other as a greeting with recent acquaintances or friends and they think you might feel uncomfortable.

For men, use "bey" ("Mr").


In Iran "bey" became old-fashioned and people call each other "agha". Normally as "Agha-ye surname".
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Re: Azeri Greetings

Postby Utopist » 2011-12-09, 19:40

Some common Azeri greetings in Azerbaijan
Nə təhərsən? (pron. as Nətərsən?) - How are you?
Nə var, nə yox? (informal) - How are you getting on?
İş-güc? (usually asked after nə var, nə yox) ~ How is your business going?
Təzə nə xəbər? - Was gibt's Neues?
Nə edirsən? (pron. as Neynirsən?) - What are you doing?
Şükür. (answer for "how are you") - (I praise God) expresses that everything is awesome
Salamatçılıq. - Everything is fine. (alive and kicking)
Yavaş-yavaş. - So-so.
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