Tamil தமிழ்

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Meera
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Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-01, 19:11

I don't know if there is any other topic for Tamil. But I was wondering if anyone else is Interested in this Langauge? I think it is so beautiful and I would love to learn but there are hardly any resources on Tamil :(

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-01, 19:14

Here are some Phrases I found off the Internet:

Basic Info:


I
Naan

You!
Nienga!

Do You Speak (English/ Tamil)?
Nienga (english/ thamizh) pésuviengala?

Just a Little.
Konjam konjam.

What's Your Name?
Unga péranna?

My Name Is ….
En péru ……….

Mr.../ Mrs.…/ Miss…
Thiru…. / Thirumadhi…. / Selvi…..

Nice To Meet You!
Ungalai santhithathil magizhchi (or) Magizhchi!

You're Very Kind!
Nienga romba nallavar.

Where Are You From?
Nienga engirundhu varrienga?

I'm From (the U.S/ Sri Lanka)
Naan …… irundhu varéan.

I’m (American)
Naan (american)…..

Where Do You Live?
Neinga engéa vasikkirienga?

I live in (the U.S/ Sri Lanka)
Naan …… il vasikkiréan.

Did You Like It Here?
Ingu nalla irukka?

Sri Lanka Is a Wonderful Country
………..oru nalla naadu!

What Do You Do For A Living?
Enna vélai seirienga?

I Work As A (Translator/ Businessman)
Naan ……. Vélai seiyaréan.

I like Tamil.
Enakku Thamizh pidikkum

I've Been Learning Tamil For 1 Month
Naan oru maasama thamizh padikkiréne.

Oh! That's Good!
O! Romba Nalladhu!

How Old Are You?
Ungalukku ethanai vayasu?

I'm (twenty, thirty…) Years Old.
Enakku ….(age)… vayasu.

I Have To Go
Naan poga véndum.

I Will Be Right Back!
Naan udané thirumpuvéne.

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-01, 19:17

Some more basic things I found:


I
Naan

He
Avan

She
Aval

You
Nee

It
Athu

A
Oru

Come
Vaa

Came
Vanthuttan(male)/vanthutta(female)

Will come
Vanthiruvan(male)/vanthiruva(female)

Open
Thera

Opened
Theranthiruke

Will open
Therakum

Sit
Ukkarru

Walk
Nadae

Eat
Saapidu

Drink
Kudi

Win
Jayie

Go
Poa

Run
Odu

I go
Naan porean

He goes
Avan poraan

He eats an apple
Avan apple saapiduvaan

He is eating an apple
Avan apple saapiduraan

He ate an apple
Avan apple saapittaan

I saw the film last week
Naan poana vaaram padam paarthean

She came by bus yesterday
Aval nethu pearundhu valiya vandha

They went to the temple
Avankellam kovilluku poannaanga

He slept the whole night
Avan mulu rathiriyum thoonkinaan

He wrote well in the examination
Avan paritchayila nalla eluthi irukkaan

He has eaten
Avan saapittu mudichutaan

He had eaten
Avan saapittaan

He had gone
Avan poittaan

He had come
Avan vanthutaan

He will eat
Avan saapiduvaan

He will go
Avan povaan

He will come
Avan varuvaan

What is your name?
Unga peru enna?


What
Enna

Your
Wun, unga(respect)

Name
paer

What did you do?
Nee enna panra, neenga enna panreenga (respect

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby kalemiye » 2008-11-01, 19:39

I like Dravidian languages too, but I have nor the time neither have I found the resources to learn the basics or anything. Anyways, I think it is easier to find resources of Malayalam than of Tamil, because it seems Malayalam has more speakers.
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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-01, 19:50

renata wrote:I like Dravidian languages too, but I have nor the time neither have I found the resources to learn the basics or anything. Anyways, I think it is easier to find resources of Malayalam than of Tamil, because it seems Malayalam has more speakers.


Yeah I was thinking of Malayalam too, but I think it's alot harder then Tamil. I am not sure though. Lol

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-01, 20:23


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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-01, 20:32

This website is for kids but its still kind of useful:
http://www.kids.noolagam.com/

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Laoshu505000 » 2008-11-02, 3:13

Vanaakam Meera,

It's interesting that you're interested in learning Tamil. It is indeed a beautiful language. Actually, I started learing Tamil a while back, but had stopped mainly due to not being able to find many people to practice with. It was frustrating not being able to find places where you could type in the actual script. However, since you've started this thread, I will start back studying. I have the course to study from already, just need to find the right places and people to practice with. Well, I look forward to talking with you soon. Take care :)

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-02, 22:04

Yeah its hard to find resources, but I think Tamil is actaully pretty logical to understand :D and very beautiful lanaguge. I found some sites that teahc Tamil, i will post them here :D

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-02, 22:33

http://www.Tamilvu.org

Tamil.net

tamilwire.com

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-03, 23:56


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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-04, 0:01

Some facts about Tamil:

one of the Dravidian languages.

one of the Classical languages of the world.

Tamil Literature spans across the space of 2500 years.

it was the first language to develop a distinct prose form of writing among the classical languages of the world.

Tamil's origins are independent of Sanskrit (which belongs to the Indo-European language family and is the ancestor of many Indian languages), but it has borrowed a number of words from Sanskrit in recent centuries. Quite significantly for its age, Tamil seems to have undergone minimal changes and adaptations over the years.

Tamil is a member of the Tamil languages group of languages, along with Irula, Kaikadi, Betta Kurumba, Sholaga, Yerukula. The Tamil languages are a subgroup of the Tamil-Malayalam languages, which in turn is a subgroup of Tamil-Kodagu languages, a subgroup of Tamil-Kannada-Telugu languages.

Tamil is spoken mainly in the south Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Other areas where Tamil is also spoken include Sri Lanka, Singapore, and Malaysia.

Dialects of Tamil identified by the Ethnologue are: Adi Dravida, Aiyar, Aiyangar, Arava, Burgandi, Kasuva, Kongar, Korava, Korchi, Madrasi, Parikala, Pattapu Bhasha, Sri Lanka Tamil, Malaya Tamil, Burma Tamil, South Africa Tamil, Tigalu, Harijan, Sanketi, Hebbar, Tirunelveli, Madurai.

Malayalam developed from a dialect of Tamil called Koduntamil or Malaithamil (literally Tamil of the mountains), spoken by the people around the hilly ranges bordering Kerala and Tamil Nadu states.

Tamil has its own writing system, which is similar to the Brahmi script of ancient India.

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-04, 0:34

Tamil Alphabet:

Image

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-04, 0:39

Some Lessons on Tamil Grammer:

Part One (nouns)-
Tamil nouns (and pronouns) are classified into two super-classes (tinai) - the "rational" (uyartinai), and the "irrational" (akrinai) - which include a total of five classes (paal, which literally means 'gender'). Humans and deities are classified as "rational", and all other nouns (animals, objects, abstract nouns) are classified as irrational. The "rational" nouns and pronouns belong to one of three classes (paal) - masculine singular, feminine singular, and rational plural. The plural form for rational nouns may be used as an honorific, gender-neutral, singular form. The "irrational" nouns and pronouns belong to one of two classes (paal) - irrational singular and irrational plural.

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-04, 0:43

Part 2 - Suffixes are also used to perform the functions of cases or postpositions. Traditional grammarians tried to group the various suffixes into 8 cases corresponding to the cases used in Sanskrit. These were the nominative, accusative, dative, sociative, genitive, instrumental, locative, and ablative. Modern grammarians, however, argue that this classification is artificial, and that Tamil usage is best understood if each suffix or combination of suffixes is seen as marking a separate case.

Tamil nouns can also take one of four prefixes, i, a, u and e which are functionally equivalent to demonstratives in English. For example, the word vaḻi meaning "way" can take these to produce ivvaḻi "this way", avvaḻi "that way", uvvaḻi "the medial way" and evvaḻi "which way".

Some nouns are formed by means of agglutination. For example, "he-who-does" or "that-which-will-become" are the so-called participial nouns. Composite nouns are formed by combining adjectives and pronouns. For example, combining "good" and "he" into "good-he" we obtain the equivalent of the English "a good man". Correspondingly, the noun "good-they" is translated as "good people". Verbal nouns in Tamil are formed from the roots of verbs and are roughly equivalent to the English "-ing" nouns.

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-04, 0:47

Part three verbs-

Verbs
Like Tamil nouns, Tamil verbs are also inflected through the use of suffixes. A typical Tamil verb form will have a number of suffixes, which show person, number, mood, tense and voice, as is shown by the following example "alintukkontiruntṉ "(I) was being destroyed":

Person and number are indicated by suffixing the oblique case of the relevant pronoun ( in the above example). The suffixes to indicate tenses and voice are formed from grammatical particles, which are added to the stem.

Tamil has two voices. The first - used in the example above - indicates that the subject of the sentence undergoes or is the object of the action named by the verb stem, and the second indicates that the subject of the sentence directs the action referred to by the verb stem. These voices are not equivalent to the notions of transitivity or causation, or to the active-passive or reflexive-nonreflexive division of voices found in Indo-european languages.

Tamil has three simple tenses - past, present, and future - indicated by simple suffixes, and a series of perfects, indicated by compound suffixes. Mood is implicit in Tamil, and is normally reflected by the same morphemes which mark tense categories. These signal whether the happening spoken of in the verb is unreal, possible, potential, or real.

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-04, 0:50

Auxiliaries
Tamil has no articles. Definiteness and indefiniteness are either indicated by special grammatical devices, such as using the number "one" as an indefinite article, or by the context. In the first person plural, Tamil makes a distinction between inclusive pronouns that include the listener and exclusive pronouns that do not. Tamil does not distinguish between adjectives and adverbs - both fall under the category uriccol. Conjunctions are called iṭaiccol.

Verb auxiliaries are used to indicate attitude, a grammatical category which shows the state of mind of the speaker, and his attitude about the event spoken of in the verb. Common attitudes include pejorative opinion, antipathy, relief felt at the conclusion of an unpleasant event or period, and unhappiness at or apprehension about the eventual result of a past or continuing event.

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-04, 1:00

http://chennaibest.com/discoverchennai/ ... ntamil.asp

A good site for learning basic tamil :)

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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby kalemiye » 2008-11-25, 18:45

Meera, thanks for putting all this together. The grammar of this language seems to be very very complex indeed!
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Re: Tamil தமிழ்

Postby Meera » 2008-11-26, 0:22

renata wrote:Meera, thanks for putting all this together. The grammar of this language seems to be very very complex indeed!


Yes Tamil grammer is very complex but logical :)


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