Ko Te Whare Kura - Maori Lessons

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Ariki
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Ko Te Whare Kura - Maori Lessons

Postby Ariki » 2005-06-01, 3:53

Kia ora anō koutou katoa,

roughly translated as "The School House", all answers to *NEW* (as well as old) lessons may be submitted here for marking.

:D :D

New lessons will be posted soon :D
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Postby Mamo » 2006-06-21, 2:26

This is my work from lesson 1.
I had some problems when I started working on this lesson:
1) I do not yet understand the difference between the prepositoin i and the preposition ki.
2) I do not yet know the imperatives, and I do not yet have a feel for the propriety of using passive suffixes.
3) I've seen Maori possesives starting with m-meaning "for" such as "māku", but I don't know if Maori has n- possesives meaning "for" the way that Hawaiian does. If there are both m- and n- possesives in Maori, I do not yet understand the difference. However, I think I remember reading somewhere about the m- possesives having some kind of meaning for possesion in the future... but I'm not sure.

With that out of the way, here are the exercises I worked on.

Riki said:
1/Pretend you live in Hangaroa, and you have met a stranger on the other side of town, attending to their garden and you want to say hello. Start up a conversation with this stranger, ask how they are and where they are from.

2/Play the part of the stranger. Invite the person you played before in to your house and show them Polynesian hospitality. It's not what you have to offer, it's how you offer it.


Exercise 1
Mamo: Kia ora na koe, e hoa. Ko wai tōu ingoa?
Malihini: Āe, Kia ora, e tōku hoa hūmārie. Ko Malihini tōku ingoa? Ko wai tōu.
Mamo: Ko Hemamonahāloanakalaukapalili tōku ingoa katoa, otirā, ko Mamo tōku ingoa mōkai. Ko Hangaroa nei tōku wāhi whānau. Nō whea mai koe?
Malihini: Nō 'Amerika au, otirā, ināianei kei te noho ahau i tēnei whenua kura, i Hangaroa nei. Kei te whiakai koe? Tomo mai ki roto i te whare kai ai.
Mamo: Kāo, otirā, tēnā koe mo to manaakitanga i tēnei rā. Me tino hoki atu au i te kāinga. Kia ora, e Malihini.
Malihini: Kia ora, e Mamo.

Mamo: Hello, friend. What is your name?
Malihini: Yes, hello, my gentlemanly friend. My name is Malihini. What is yours?
Mamo: Hemamonahāloanakalaukapalili is my full name, however, Mamo is my nickname. Hangaroa, here, is my birthplace. Where are you from?
Malihini: I am from America, however, now I am living in this beautiful land, in Hangaroa. Are you hungry. Come inside the house to eat.
Mamo: No, however,thank you for your hospitality today. I have to return home. Farewell, Malihini.
Malihini: Farewell, Mamo.


Exercise 2
Malihini: Tēnā anō koe, e Mamo. Kua hoki mai koe. Kei te pewhea koe.
Mamo: Tēnā koe, e Malihini. E mateinu ana au. He rā tino wera tēnei rā.
Malihini: Āe, tika koe. Haere mai ki roto i te whare nei. Inumia ngā pia e tāua.
Mamo: Kia ora. He tangata ngākau aroha koe.

Malihini: Hello again, Mamo. You returned. How are you?
Mamo: Hello, Malihini. I am thirsty. Today is a hot day.
Malihini: Yes, you're right. Come inside of the house. Let's drink beer.
Mamo: Thank you. You are a kind-hearted person.

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Postby Ariki » 2006-06-21, 10:04

Tēnā koe e hoa,

I had some problems when I started working on this lesson:
1) I do not yet understand the difference between the prepositoin i and the preposition ki.


Understandably so. Ki is used for 'towards' while 'i' literally means 'at'. It is also used for marking the object and the stative agent. It also functions as the past tense marker. To give an example of their usages....

I haere atu au ki te whare. I went to the house.

Kua ora au i te tupua. I was saved by the tupua. Tupua often gets translated as 'goblin' but I don't think Māui was quite a goblin....he was a man. Tupua are beings that have supernatural powers, and often, end up turning in to rocks.

2) I do not yet know the imperatives, and I do not yet have a feel for the propriety of using passive suffixes.


Imperatives can be formed in three ways -

You can say the verb with just a passive suffix attached e.g. - nohoa! Sit!

You can use e before a verb less than two vowel lengths long e.g. e tū! stand!

However, if the verb has more than two vowels, then the e is left out. E.g. kaukau! Swim!

Or you can use 'me' - which means 'must'. E.g. me kai tēnei! This must be eaten!

3) I've seen Maori possesives starting with m-meaning "for" such as "māku", but I don't know if Maori has n- possesives meaning "for" the way that Hawaiian does. If there are both m- and n- possesives in Maori, I do not yet understand the difference. However, I think I remember reading somewhere about the m- possesives having some kind of meaning for possesion in the future... but I'm not sure.


M possession is used for marking 'future possession'. N is used for marking 'past possession'. And this is how actor emphatics works as well. So essentially, it is ungrammatical to say 'nāku e kōrero' (I will speak) it must be expressed as 'māku e kōrero'. It may take a while to get used to since only two Tahitic languages only have this feature (that I know of) - the Māori dialects of New Zealand, and the Māori dialect of Tongareva (an island in the Cook Islands).

Mamo: Kia ora na koe, e hoa. Ko wai tōu ingoa?
Malihini: Āe, Kia ora, e tōku hoa hūmārie. Ko Malihini tōku ingoa? Ko wai tōu.
Mamo: Ko Hemamonahāloanakalaukapalili tōku ingoa katoa, otirā, ko Mamo tōku ingoa mōkai. Ko Hangaroa nei tōku wāhi whānau. Nō whea mai koe?
Malihini: Nō 'Amerika au, otirā, ināianei kei te noho ahau i tēnei whenua kura, i Hangaroa nei. Kei te whiakai koe? Tomo mai ki roto i te whare kai ai.
Mamo: Kāo, otirā, tēnā koe mo to manaakitanga i tēnei rā. Me tino hoki atu au i te kāinga. Kia ora, e Malihini.
Malihini: Kia ora, e Mamo.


Tūmeke! Awesome! Ka rawe tāu kōrero e hoa! I have to say I'm impressed...you sure you aren't a speaker of Māori :wink: . Only a few minor (and I mean minor) corrections. I can see where the difficulty lies distinguishing between i/ki especially since your reo tupuna uses 'i' for both.

whenua kura


kura does mean red, and its associated meanings of chieftainship (the huruhuru manu etc). However, kura (as far as I can remember) does not mean 'beautiful'. Pai or ātaahua would be fine to use here e hoa. Whenua kura literally means 'red land, chiefly land' etc (and whenua also carries with it the meaning of placenta etc).

Me tino hoki atu au i te kāinga


should be ki (ki - location/goal), however, that sentence is quite understandable because of 'hoki' and 'atu'.

Amerika has no glottal stop at the front but I guess it does in Hawai'ian?

I also like the fact that you've used phrases such as wāhi whānau.

Exercise 2
Malihini: Tēnā anō koe, e Mamo. Kua hoki mai koe. Kei te pewhea koe.
Mamo: Tēnā koe, e Malihini. E mateinu ana au. He rā tino wera tēnei rā.
Malihini: Āe, tika koe. Haere mai ki roto i te whare nei. Inumia ngā pia e tāua.
Mamo: Kia ora. He tangata ngākau aroha koe.


Ok, this was quite well done as well. Everything I write here will make it even better. Just for the first sentence, if you want to say 'again' you can use anō (it occurs at the end of a phrase, after mai, atu, iho and ake and the deictic particles nei, na/nā and ra/rā).

Ah, and don't forget a macron over the 'e' in pēwhea. I'm not too sure if I remembered to put one on myself in the lessons, but I'll go back and look and see.

He rā tino wera tēnei rā.


This is quite fine. You can also say inaianei as opposed to tēnei rā. You can also leave out the second rā as well.

tika koe


THis is fine as well. Other ways of saying it include 'he tika tāu' and 'kei te tika tēnā' or 'e tika ana tēnā'.

Inumia ngā pia e tāua


Ok, this one would be better said as this -

kia inumia e tāua ngā pia - let's drink beers. The particle 'kia' means 'to', and is used to express 'desire'. It's a desiderative particle. E.g.

kia haere tāua ki te kura. Let's go to school.

Or even - kia ora - may you be well.

He tangata ngākau aroha koe.


This is quite understandable, and quite cute/sweet (even though the English translation may not be - I guess because there is depth and feeling in words like ngākau and aroha that gets lost in the translation in to English).

The words 'pai' and 'atawhai' are also used in this way with aroha. Pai (even though it means good) is also used for beautiful as opposed to ātaahua so that - he wahine pai can mean 'a beautiful woman' as well as 'a nice woman' and 'a good woman'.

He tino ātaahua tāu tuhituhinga e hoa. Kua pai kia kite atu e mau ana i a koe ngā āria ngāwari o ngā ture o te reo Māori. Kua whakamahia hoki e koe tōu mātauranga o te reo o ngā tūpuna. Tēnā koe.

Ngāwari = ngohengohe, māmā (easy), simple
āria = concept (manako)
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

Mamo
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Postby Mamo » 2006-06-23, 3:39

This is my work for lesson 2. But I did encounter some probelms.
(1) When I was writing the dialogue, I wasn't sure about how to use the word "and" in Maori when using qualifiers; for example, I was not sure how to say in Maori "admirable and intelligent ancestors," but I think I vaguely recall seeing something about using "e te" for "and" under these circumstances, however, it is possible that I imagined this phrase in a desperate attempt to find the Maori equivalent.
(2) The uses of "ki" and "i" still confuse me. Right now, I'm thinking that "ki" implies some kind of movement, whereas "i" does not, but may be only because I am comparing the Maori "ki" and "i" to the Hawaiian "i" and "ma." But then again, I'm not sure whether the propriety of choosing "ki" over
(3)I wasnt sure if there was a way to negate a sentence like "Kei te haere au," and in negating "i haere au" I wrote "Kaore i te haere au" but I'm not sure if there is suppossed to be a "te" before the verb in negating past tense sentences.

My efforts are below.


1) Translate the following

(A) I haere mātou ki te whare o te tamatoa ko Manu Koa. I inu mātou he wai.
- We (plural excluding addressee) went to the house of the warrior boy (whose name is) Manu Koa. We drank water.

(B)Āpōpō, e tangi mai ngā manu i te ata .
- Tomorrow, the birds are going to sing in the morning.

(C) E Pua! Whakarongo mai ki tōu whaea!
- Hey Pua! Listen to your mother!


2) Write up a short passage asking where (whea/hea) things are (present tense = kei). You may need to refer to the dialogue in this lesson to get ideas.


Mamo: Kia ora na anō koe e hoa. Kua hoki mai anō koe i tōu whare ki kōnei kia inu iho anō he pia?
Malihini: Kia ora e Mamo. Kāo, kāore au i te haere mai anō ki tēnei kaokao o te tāone inu pia ai me koe, engari, kua hanake mai ahau ki te ui ki a koe, kei whea te whare pukapuka o Hangaroa.
Mamo: E tūtata ana taua whare pukapuka ki te whare wānanga kei muri I tēnei takiwā o te tāone o ō tāua tūpuna rangatira e te atamai. He aha koe e rapu nei ki te whare pukapuka?
Malihini: Kei roto tāku wahine pai i taua whare pukapuka e tatari ana ki tōku taenga mai, notemea, e haere ana māua ko tāku wahine i te whare pukapuka ki te kōnohete i te ahiahi nei.
Mamo: Auē, i pēnei wau ka haere koe ki reira ki te ako.
Malihini: E hoa, he waea tāu, notemea, e tōmuri ana ahau, a me karanga au ki a ia. He waea tāu?
Mamo: Āe, kei roto te waea i te whare. Ka taea e koe te tomo mai ki roto kia karanga ki a ia, engari, kia waihotia e koe tōu hū kei waho nei i mua o tāu tomokanga ki roto I te whare. Auē, kei a wai tāku kī whare?
Malihini: Kei a koe tāu kī; kei roto i tōu ringa katau.


Mamo: Hello again friend. You did you come back again from your house to here to drink beer again.
Malihini: Hello Mamo. No, I didn’t come back to this side of town to drink beer with you, but, I came here to ask you where the Hangaroa’s library is.
Mamo: The aforementioned library is close to the university behind this area of the town of our admirable and intelligent ancestors . Why are you searching for the li brary?
Malihini: My pretty girlfriend is inside of the aforementioned library waiting for my arrival, because, we are going from the library to the concert this afternoon.
Mamo: Ho, I assumed you were going there to study.
Malihini: Hey friend, do you have a phone, because, I am late, and I must call her.
Mamo: Yes, the phone is in the house. You can come inside to call her, however, leave your shoes outside here before you enter the house. Hey, who has my house key?
Malihini: You have your key; it's in your right hand

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Ariki
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Postby Ariki » 2006-06-23, 8:54

(1) When I was writing the dialogue, I wasn't sure about how to use the word "and" in Maori when using qualifiers; for example, I was not sure how to say in Maori "admirable and intelligent ancestors," but I think I vaguely recall seeing something about using "e te" for "and" under these circumstances, however, it is possible that I imagined this phrase in a desperate attempt to find the Maori equivalent.


No that's fine - that may have been a typo of mine (I'm self concious with how I type). It would be 'me te'.

(2) The uses of "ki" and "i" still confuse me. Right now, I'm thinking that "ki" implies some kind of movement, whereas "i" does not, but may be only because I am comparing the Maori "ki" and "i" to the Hawaiian "i" and "ma." But then again, I'm not sure whether the propriety of choosing "ki" over


Hopefully the explanation following will be helpful!

I = at, on, with (past)
Ki = towards
Kei = at, on, with (present)
Hei = at, on, with (future)

E.g. Kei te whare au = I'm at the house
I te whare au (I was at the house)
Hei te whare au (I will be at the house)
Ki te whare au (e haere atu ana) = I'm going to the house

(3)I wasnt sure if there was a way to negate a sentence like "Kei te haere au," and in negating "i haere au" I wrote "Kaore i te haere au" but I'm not sure if there is suppossed to be a "te" before the verb in negating past tense sentences.


Ok i haere au negates as 'kāore au i haere'.

Kāore au i te haere is the negation of 'kei te haere au'.

1) Translate the following

(A) I haere mātou ki te whare o te tamatoa ko Manu Koa. I inu mātou he wai.
- We (plural excluding addressee) went to the house of the warrior boy (whose name is) Manu Koa. We drank water.


Āe, he tika tēnā.

(B)Āpōpō, e tangi mai ngā manu i te ata .
- Tomorrow, the birds are going to sing in the morning.


Ā, he tika tonu tāu whakapākehātanga, engari, me āta titiro ki ngā pū - tēnā pea, kua hē tāku whakamāramatanga i te whakamāoritanga tika o ēnā tū rerenga kōrero. Me pēnei kē -

Tomorrow, the birds will sing in the morning.

I know it's quite picky and pedantic at best. But, if we were to say, 'Tomorrow, the birds will be singing' it would either be -

Āpūpū, e tangi mai ana ngā manu i te ata

OR

Āpūpū, ka tangi mai ngā manu i te ata (colloquial and modern)

(C) E Pua! Whakarongo mai ki tōu whaea!
- Hey Pua! Listen to your mother!


He uihanga tāku (I have a question)

Nā wai tēnā i kī? (In other words who would have said that, i tōu manako)

Now, I have just a few suggestions to make, I have read what you have written. My suggestions are to help broaden your knowledge of te reo Māori me ōna tikanga and to also give you as much exposure as possible to different ways of saying the same thing. Following each quote, I've made some suggestions to help get a sense of the different ways the same thing could be said. But the majority of what you have written is perfectly fine. I'm just trying to help 'fine tune' some parts.

Although I have read your English translation, I'm going to treat the Māori version as the target language and English as the source language.

Mamo: Kia ora na anō koe e hoa. Kua hoki mai anō koe i tōu whare ki kōnei kia inu iho anō he pia?


kia inu iho anō he pia - if I was to translate that in to English, that would mean (trying to preserve as much of the essence as possible) -'to down some more beer again'. You could have said (to try and capture the essence of what you wrote in the English) - i tōu whare ki kōnei inu pia ai anō (ai would be used because of location emphasis - ki kōnei. Had you had placed ki kōnei at the end then you could have said ki te or kia).

Malihini: Kia ora e Mamo. Kāo, kāore au i te haere mai anō ki tēnei kaokao o te tāone inu pia ai me koe, engari, kua hanake mai ahau ki te ui ki a koe, kei whea te whare pukapuka o Hangaroa


While I understood kaokao, technically it only means 'flank, rib bones'. wāhi or wāhanga would have worked fine instead. And instead of 'me koe', i a koe (where i means - by and hence 'with'). Engari does mean but, however, it has a negative connotation. A more positive one (and this is what I would have used in this context) is 'otirā'. Hanake in Māori would be whanake, and that means 'to kick'. However, whanatu, manatu, whano, whanau, haere and even tae would be fine (however tae means to arrive). A synonym for ui is pātai. ki a koe could also be 'i a koe'.

Mamo: E tūtata ana taua whare pukapuka ki te whare wānanga kei muri I tēnei takiwā o te tāone o ō tāua tūpuna rangatira e te atamai. He aha koe e rapu nei ki te whare pukapuka?


Kei muri could also be 'i muri'. Some synonyms for 'atamai' include - ihumanea, kākama (fast), kamakama (fast), matatau, mātau (wise, learned), and even tohunga (I wouldn't recommend non-Polynesians using 'tohunga' unless if they truely know its true significance. tohunga = kahuna). A know it all, is a 'he whakaputa mōhio'.

Malihini: Kei roto tāku wahine pai i taua whare pukapuka e tatari ana ki tōku taenga mai, notemea, e haere ana māua ko tāku wahine i te whare pukapuka ki te kōnohete i te ahiahi nei.


notemea is a particularly old spelling (ah, it was nice to see this spelling being used!). A more modern spelling is 'nō te mea'.

Mamo: Auē, i pēnei wau ka haere koe ki reira ki te ako.


pōhēhē would be more likely to be used rather than 'pēnei', that's not to say that your use was wrong. One of the limitations of these forum boards is the inability to post sound clips and being able to see body language. When I think about it, it sounds quite nice. Maybe a comma would have helped? (seperating wau and ka). The second part of the phrase could have been said like this - ka haere koe ki reira ako ai (location emphasis). The underlying sentence for the suggestion I made is - ka haere koe ki te ako ki/i reira, where the phrase 'ki reira' occurs at the end, forming the location part of the phrase.

Malihini: E hoa, he waea tāu, notemea, e tōmuri ana ahau, a me karanga au ki a ia. He waea tāu?


karanga is fine however a lot of people use 'waea' as a verb to mean 'to call' (on the phone only).

Mamo: Āe, kei roto te waea i te whare. Ka taea e koe te tomo mai ki roto kia karanga ki a ia, engari, kia waihotia e koe tōu hū kei waho nei i mua o tāu tomokanga ki roto I te whare. Auē, kei a wai tāku kī whare?


What you wrote is fine, however, I would have said the second sentence like this (this is my own personal style, so, don't hopohopo too much) -

E pai ana kia tomo koe ki roto ki te (kia) karanga (ai - only if the kia is phrase is used, and, is optional), otirā, me waiho e koe ō hū i waho i mua i tō tomokanga ki roto i/ki te whare.

Now the reason why I used 'pai' instead of 'taea' is that 'pai' also means 'fine, ok'. I would have used 'me' because it is a stronger imperative than kia. Kia is fine and is completely polite, however, 'me' for me, carries a sense of urgency that it should be obeyed or otherwise since this is a tapu/noa issue. You'll notice that the marking is ergative because there is no passive suffix yet the passive agent marker is used - imperatives using 'me' do not take passive markers. However, aw lot of second language learners passivise verbs in 'me' sentences.

Malihini: Kei a koe tāu kī; kei roto i tōu ringa katau.

Another word for 'right' (as opposed to left) is matau.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading what you have done. I feel that because you know Hawai'ian grammar that you know what you are doing, so I feel, that my tūranga (position), is more of a 'kaiarataki' (guide). I really liked what you had to say about the tūpuna - had that been said anywhere else on this forum a lot of people would have had issues with commentary like that. Tino rangatiratanga (Self-determination) type movements aren't really well understood. I've received a lot of flack here and have been called racist when I've tried to talk about the wrongs of colonisation. Its a particularly sore point with a lot of people here.

If you were to come over here to learn te reo Māori, you'd easily pass the papers the here because of your extensive knowledge of Hawai'ian. I'm quite pleased with the level of fluency that you have attained in such a short time!

he pātai anō tāku - he wahine koe, he tāne rānei? You may have said, but I don't know.
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

Mamo
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Gender: male
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby Mamo » 2006-06-25, 5:40

Here is my work for lesson 3.

Todays lesson there is no translation given for the dialogue. Instead, for homework, you will have to translate the dialogue using the words I have given you and the grammatical structural analysis that I have given.

Kōrero

Ko Waka e kimi atu ana ki tāna pukapuka

Auē kei whea tāku pukapuka? I kitea mai e au te pukapuka i te awatea nei, engari, kua ngaro atu anō. Kei a wai tāku pukapuka? Ki tōku manako i a Riu te pukapuka. E, me haere atu au ki a ia, ka ui atu ki a ia ināiapō.

Ko Riu
Auē! Nāianei, e tomo atu mātou i a Anakena. Kua pai ināianei. I marino ngā ngaru. He pai te pukapuka a Waka. He nui rawa. Me hoko au he kai māna. He hoa pai ia ki a au.

Translate the above passages.


Story

Waka searching for his book:

Auē where is my book? The book was seen by me this afternoon, however, it was recently lost again. Who has my book? In my opinion, Riu has the book. Hey, I better go to him, and ask question him [about the book] tonight (not sure what ināiapō is).

Riu: Auē! Right now, we will enter Anakena. It is beautiful right now. The waves are calm. Waka's book is good-looking [Waka's book is a good-looking thing]. It is very big [It is a big thing]. I better by food for him. He is a good friend to me.

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Postby Ariki » 2006-06-25, 5:47

Well your translation was 99.9% correct. Only one word out (understandably) - nāianei (soon). Once again, nice translating :D

If you really want to test your skills however, I suggest you read the 'he karere' section for some of the Engligh - Māori translations.
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.


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