Ko Te Mara'e Vananga Rapa Nui - The Rapa Nui Language Mara'e

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Ariki
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Ko Te Mara'e Vananga Rapa Nui - The Rapa Nui Language Mara'e

Postby Ariki » 2004-12-10, 1:54

Iorana korua ananake,

This thread is for all of those who are interested in learning how to speak the Rapa Nui language of Easter Island (a.k.a. Rapa Nui, Te Pito O Te Henua).

It is an Eastern Polynesian language in the Austronesian family of languages. It is related to Lea Fakatonga (Tongan,, a Western Polynesian language), reo Māohi (Tahitian), `ōlelo Hawai`i (Hawai`ian), Cook Islands Māori and NZ Māori.

The Rapa Nui language uses 14 letters, 5 vowels (which can be lengthened or shortened) and 9 consonants.

The Rapa Nui come from Hiva. It's exact locations are not generally well known. Is it in the Marquesas archipelago? Or is it in the equator? Or is it even an island next to South America? Settlement of Rapa Nui began in 500 A.D. and Hotu Matu'a is the first ariki (supreme chief, king) of the island, establishing a dynasty that lasted until the 19th century. Their ancestors fled their homeland as their home, Hiva, sank in to the ocean. This same situation occurs, 1500 years later, for islands like Tuvalu and Tokelau.

The Rapa Nui language is a language based on being euphonic (as Māori is). That is, it is based on sounding pleasant to the ear of the listener and speaker. Every consonant has a vowel following it (with the exception of 'ng') meaning that there are no consonant clusters.

Those who are interested in studying te vānanga Rapa Nui need only to leave a message. Do join us, and let's learn the Rapa Nui language together!

Kia maitaki tō korua ra'a

(may your day be pleasant).

*mara'e - traditional gathering area for Polynesians for important activities.
Last edited by Ariki on 2005-06-01, 3:55, edited 3 times in total.
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Postby Strigo » 2004-12-10, 2:05

Iorana!

I'm curious about the language, because as you may know, Rapa Nui is a Chilean island. :D I'd like to learn something about its culture, and there's nothing better to learn the language!.

I'm in!
Aquí es donde traduzco diariamente música israelí del hebreo al español

[flag]cl[/flag] native; [flag]en[/flag] fluent; [flag]il[/flag] lower advanced ; [flag]pt-BR[/flag] read fluently, understand well, speak not so badly (specially after some Itaipava); recently focusing on [flag]sv[/flag][flag]ar[/flag] and I promised myself to finish my [flag]ru[/flag] New Penguin Russian Course: A Complete Course for Beginners in less than a month (12/oct/2013). Wants to wake up one day speaking [flag]ka[/flag][flag]lt[/flag] and any Turkic language.

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Postby bluechiron1 not signed in » 2004-12-10, 16:25

Sign me up!

I love that you're starting in January so I'll have time to follow! :D

~bluechiron

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Postby senatortombstone » 2004-12-10, 18:52

I too shall check this course out when it begins!

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Postby Raza » 2004-12-11, 0:18

Hey riki,

Thank you for setting up this course. I remember a couple of months ago watching this excellent documentary on those famous and mysterious giant statues of Easter Island, and I was really fascinated by them. So I'd surely like to know more about the culture, and of course the language of the Rapa Nui people.

So count me in also. 8)

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Postby ego » 2004-12-11, 20:15

Of course I will be a student as well. I think I can not chose which one I prefer so I will follow both :)

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Postby projetdefleur » 2004-12-11, 20:19

I'll definitely keep an eye on this class, although I think I'll follow the Māori class more closely.
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Postby Ariki » 2005-01-10, 9:05

Otoroka kōrua ta'atoa!
How to make the macrons 'appear'
1/ To make the macrons appear, make sure you change the board style to "redIce", click here http://forum.unilang.org/phpBB2/profile ... ditprofile.
2/ The following codes will add the line above the vowel -
Ā = &# 256; (with no spaces between the # and the first digit)
ā = &# 257;
Ē = &# 274;
ē = &# 275;
Ī = &# 298;
ī = &# 299;
Ō = &# 332;
ō = &# 333;
Ū = &# 362;
ū = &# 363;

Macrons are important as they mark vowel length. A vowel with a macron is pronounced twice as long as a vowel with no macron. Apologies for the vowel length in this lesson, it's not all accurately marked yet. I'm still learning Rapa Nui myself.

I just want to say for those of you who are reading you've just taken the first big step to learning another language. I want you to know what you are doing is notable and honourable and the Rapa Nui people will love you for it.

I want this group to be a Pupa Vananga, a language nest. That is, a place where we can all learn and value what each of us has to share.

Te Vānanga Rapa Nui is a language that I have learnt a lot about, but I am in no way an expert at the language. Therefore, by having us meet regularly to vananga and to work on the lessons I submit, my fluency and certainly your fluency will increase in the language.

I will be acting as the mäori (instructor, teacher) for these lessons.

The letters are

A, E, I, O, U (the vowels, which can be lengthened)

H, K, M, N, NG (OR G), P, R, T, V (the consonants)

' <--- the aspirate

NOTE ON THE 'NG' AND 'G'

Both are pronounced the same. They are pronounced as the ng in singer (without the si or the er part). It has become custom on the island to write the 'ng' as 'g' now. So ma'uga and ma'unga are the same word. Both will be accepted as being correct.

Pronunciation Guide

All consonants are how you would pronounce them in English, however, the 'r' is pronounced as an 'r/d' sound and not a 'r/l' (rolled Japanese r). P is more of a p/b sound and the t can be pronounced as a 'ts' depending on which vowels follow it. However, an English pronunciation of p and t is ok, but not as good as the real 'Rapa Nui' one :).

The vowels are pronounced as you would pronounce them in Spanish, Japanese, Hawai`ian, Tahitian, Tongan etc.

A = Ah
E = Eh
I = EE
O = AW
U = OO

You can remember the pronounciation by this silly sentence -

Ah they eat walls too?

Each lesson will consist of a dialogue, with a Rapa Nui and an English version, as well as explainations of what each part of it means. Following the dialogue there will be a vocabulary list, and some homework exercises.

Dialogue

Vaka : Aroha, ko ai tō'ou ingoa?
Riu : Aroha, ko riu töku ingoa, ko ai tō'ou?
Vaka : Ko Vaka töku, ō hē mai koe?
Riu : Ō Rarotonga mai au, ō hē koe?
Vaka : Ō Rapa Nui au, maruaki koe?
Riu : Ina, matevai au
Vaka : Ka oho mai ki roto,
Riu : Ina, maururu, ka oho atu au ki te umu I te oneone, e oho mai koe?
Vaka : Ee, e oho atu au ki te umu
Riu : E kite atu hakaou au ki a koe I reira, 'iorana
Vaka : Ee, e kite atu hakaou au ki a koe I reira I te ahiahi nei, 'iorana.

(English)
Vaka : Hey, what's your name?
Riu : Hey, my name is Riu, what's yours?
Vaka : My name is Vaka, where are you from?
Riu : I'm from Rarotonga, where are you from?
Vaka : I'm from Rapa Nui, are you hungry?
Riu : No, but I'm dying for water
Vaka : Come inside,
Riu : No thanks, I have to go to the umu at the beach, are you going?
Vaka : Yes, I'll be going to the umu
Riu : I'll see you again there, see you
Vaka : Yes, I'll see you again there this afternoon, bye.

Iorana/otoroka/aroha - greetings

What is your name?

Ko ai tō'ou /tuu ingoa?

Ko Tāne Te Ariki tōku ingoa.

Ko ai tō'ou ingoa hakaponoko Tāne Te Ariki?

Ko Riki tō'oku ingoa hakaponoko.

Where are you from?

Ō hē mai koe?

I'm from Aotearoa

Ō Aotearoa mai au.

Pēhē/Pahē - How

To say how are you in Rapa Nui you say -

Pēhē;/Pahe koe? How are you?

You might reply -

Riva au - I'm good
Kino au - I'm bad
Rakerake au - I'm really bad
Maruaki au - I'm hungry

If you want to ask a group of people how they are, you say -

Pēhē/pahe kōua ta'atoa? How are all of you?

What if you wanted to say 'this morning/afternoon/tonight/today'?

You would say -

Pēhē koe i te ...(time).... nei

E.g.

Pēhē koe i te 'otea nei?

How are you this midday (no English equivalent).


Etahi Kupu Ho'ou - New Words
'Iorana - Hi, bye (from Tahitian 'Ia Orāna)
Aroha - Hey, greetings
Koe - you (singular)
Kōrua - you (plural)
Au - I/me
Ta'atoa - All
Auē - Interjection of sadness
Maori - Teacher, intelligent, clear, lucid
Mā`ohi - Polynesian
Maruaki - Hungry
Matevai - Thirsty (for water)
Koa - Joy, happy, love
veri/nehe - beautiful
matenga - death, sickness
ata - morning
'otea - midday
ahiahi - afternoon
po - night
Noho mai - sit
Tomo mai - enter
Ka oho mai - welcome
tano'a - correct
me'e - thing
i te hora nei - now
anira/arina - soon, now
Ee - yes
Ina - no
Ingoa - name
Ingoa hakaponoko - nickname
Riva - good
Kino - bad
Rakerake - really bad
Pahe/Pēhē - how

Homework -

To maintain what you learn, it's important for you to do this part, as it allows you to put in to practice what you have learnt from the lesson. Please present these to the class.

1/Pretend you live in Hangaroa, and you have met a stranger on the other side of town, attending to their garden and you want to say hello. Start up a conversation with this stranger, ask how they are and where they are from.

2/Play the part of the stranger. Invite the person you played before in to your house and show them Polynesian hospitality. It's not what you have to offer, it's how you offer it.
Last edited by Ariki on 2005-12-13, 21:04, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby bluechiron » 2005-01-10, 22:02

I tried writing this with the same format as the Maaori dialogue.

If I may ask, in both lessons there is an "e" that links the sentences. Is it a polite hesitation? Or does it have another function?

A: Veri ahiahi, ko ai tou ingoa?
B: Aroha, ko Juan töku ingoa, ko ai tou?
A: Ko Linda töku, o he koe?
B: O Manila au, o he koe?
A: O Hangaroa au. Ko ai tou ingoa hakaponoko?
B: Ko Juanito. Pahe koe?
A: Riva (but) matevai au.
B: Tomo mai! Ka oho mai, noho. (offers water)
A: (thanks). Iorana.
Shukta shimi yuyankapak, kanpa ñawikunata wichkana ushankakunarakmi kanpa shungutawan uyankirakpish.
To know another language, first your eyes will have to be open, and you will have to listen with your heart.

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Postby riki not logged in » 2005-01-12, 6:42

`Iorana,

the 'e' particle is like 'eh'...to non-speakers it sounds pidgin-like, but yes, it's more or less saying 'hey so and so' and yes, it is a polite form. There is a rule on how to use it, and I will bring that up next lesson.

Also, with the macrons and vowel lengthening, I'm more open on the use of marking double vowels, as written Rapa Nui is slowly catching up with the rest of Polynesia.

Plus, when I wrote this I did single vowels first and I didn't have enough time to type in all the macron codes...it's very fastidious I find to type it all in.

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Postby Ariki » 2005-01-20, 3:16

Otoroka hakaou!

This is the second lesson for those of you who wish to learn how to speak te vānanga Rapa Nui. These lessons are designed
to help learn how to speak basic Rapa Nui. The lessons will always have a 'he kupu ho'ou' (new words) section that will help
add more words to your vocabulary for the homework exercises. There are also two short sections on articles and tense markers.

Just some corrections on the homework....

A: Veri ahiahi......

I'm not sure what you meant by veri ahiahi....But I'm sure you meant 'iorana/aroha koe i te ahiahi nei? Good evening?

Lesson 2

Ko Te Umu - The Umu

Riu : 'Iorana koe ngaruhoa,
Vaka : 'Iorana
Riu: ngaruhoa, noho mai
Vaka : I hē ngā kai?
Riu : he tunu nō
Vaka : he tunu rāua he aha?
Riu : he tunu rāua he kūmara, he hoi, he poke, he puaka vi'e hoki!
Vaka : E reka!
Riu : He 'ite koe i te taime e hoa?
Vaka : Ina, kai 'ite au i te taime
Riu : Ku haere nō koe ki te hare ho'o?
Vaka : Ina, he aha ai?
Riu : A, mate inu ai au
Vaka : Ku haere atu nō ana a Vi'e ki te hare ho'o, he ho'o mai ia he inu
Riu : Riva! Ka hoki iho ia
Vaka : Ara! E tu'u iho ia
Riu : He vi'e nehenehe ia
Vaka : Ee, e toru ānā poki
Riu : Aue
Vi'e : Aroha kōrua, anei ngā kai me ngā inu.
Vaka : Maururu
Vi'e (ki a Riu): O hē mai koe?
Riu : O au, o hē mai koe?
Vi'e : He tangata mā'ohi au o Rapa Nui nei. Ko ai tōu ingoa?
Riu : Ko Riu tōku ingoa, ko ai tōu ingoa?
Vi'e : Ko Vi'e tōku ingoa.

Riu : Hey friend!
Vaka : Hey!
Riu : Friend, sit by me
Vaka : Where is the food?
Riu : It's still being cooked
Vaka : What are they cooking?
Riu : They are cooking kണmara, horse, poke and cow too!
Vaka : Nice!
Riu : Do you have the time?
Vaka : Nah, I don't have the time
Riu : Have you already gone to the shop?
Vaka : Nah, why is that?
Riu : Ah, I'm thirsty
Vaka : Vi'e has already gone off to the shop, she's buying some drinks
Riu : Good! She must return soon
Vaka : There! She will arrive soon
Riu : She's a beautiful looking lady
Vaka : Yeah, she's got three children
Riu : Aue
Vi'e : Greetings you two, here's the food and the drink (Vaka)
Vaka : Thanks
Vi'e (to Riu): Where are you from?
Riu : I'm from where are you from?
Vi'e : I'm a native from Rapa Nui. What is your name?
Riu : My name is Riu, what is your name?
Vi'e : My name is Vi'e

Verb Phrases
Rapa Nuiis a VSO language - Verb - Subject - Object. For example = He oho(verb) atu ahau(subject) ki te kāinga (town) = I'm(subject) going(verb) to town(object)

Very rarely do you hear sentences in SVO. VSO is the preffered order in Māori and Rapa Nui.

Tense Markers

I (simple past)
E (simple future, imperative)

e.g. I hopu ia i te otea nei = He/she swam this midday
I kai = ate, i noho = sat
E hoki mai ia āpō = He/she will return tomorrow
E kai = will eat, e noho = will sit

He (present tense, when not expressing will or wish) e.g. he oho atu au ki reira = I'm going to that (previously mentioned) place
Ku..ana (present tense, past tense = has, had, have been) e.g. ku aroha ana au ki a koe = I love you, ku vānanga atu au ki a ia = I have spoken to him/her


Imperatives
Kia (command) = kia vave! be quick!
Ka (weak imperative) = ka kai koe - you should eat
E noho! = Sit !

Articles

The articles in Rapa Nui are fairly simple and easy to learn. We will start with the basics (te, ngā, a and he)

Te (definitive, number, non-person, class) = the (singular) = te mamari (the egg)
Ngā (definitive, number, non-person) = the (plural) e.g. ngā mamari = the eggs
A (definitive, non-number, person) = no English equivalent, used before first names e.g. he nui a Aroha = Aroha is big
He (infinitive, non-number, non-person) = a, some e.g. he mamari = an egg, some eggs

Homework (you may need to visit here http://www.rongorongo.org/vanaga/a.html)
1/ Translate the following

A)I haere mātou ki te hare o te matato'a ko Manu Koa. I inu mātou he vai kava.

B)Āpō, e tangi mai ngā manu i te ata

C) E Pua! Hakarongo mai ki tōu nua!

2/ Write up a short passage asking where (hē) things are (present tense = i). You may need to refer to the dialogue in this lesson to get ideas.

He Kupu Ho'ou
nō = already
rāua = they (plural)
ika = fish
kūmara = sweet potato
hoi = horse
maika = banana
puaka vi'e = cow (puaka/poaka in cognate Polynesian languages means pig)
reka = sweet, delicious, nice (of taste)
'Ite = to know (Tahitian gain word)
Taime = Time
Kai = not, food
hare ho'o = shop
ho'o = to buy, to sell, to trade, to barter (Tahitian gain word)
iho = soon
vi'e = female
tāne = male
koro = father
nua = mother
henua = land, placenta
poki = child
maitaki = nice, lovely, good
himene = hymn
hanga = bay, harbour
maururu = thankyou (Tahitian gain word)
āpō = tomorrow
mamari = egg
kiko = meat
oneone = beach
rama = torch (possible Tahitian gain)
noho = to sit, stay, live
kai = to eat

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Postby bluechiron » 2005-01-29, 1:57

I'm still working on everything here (and busy, so I am slow!).

In the meantime, would it be possible to discuss numbers and counting? Perhaps to 100? I heard that Rapanui uses two different forms of cardinal numbers, and am curious.

Thanks Riki!
Shukta shimi yuyankapak, kanpa ñawikunata wichkana ushankakunarakmi kanpa shungutawan uyankirakpish.
To know another language, first your eyes will have to be open, and you will have to listen with your heart.

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Postby ego » 2005-02-10, 0:33

Iorana, Ia orana, Kia ora, Talofa, Aloha, Mālō e lelei, Bula etc etc :D

Riki asked me to tell you that he is going to give a new lesson next week because he has been a bit busy the past days.

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Postby Strigo » 2005-02-10, 2:49

Hey!

That's good.... because I'll be on holidays for a week, so I'll have time to read the first lessons carefully.

See ya!
Aquí es donde traduzco diariamente música israelí del hebreo al español

[flag]cl[/flag] native; [flag]en[/flag] fluent; [flag]il[/flag] lower advanced ; [flag]pt-BR[/flag] read fluently, understand well, speak not so badly (specially after some Itaipava); recently focusing on [flag]sv[/flag][flag]ar[/flag] and I promised myself to finish my [flag]ru[/flag] New Penguin Russian Course: A Complete Course for Beginners in less than a month (12/oct/2013). Wants to wake up one day speaking [flag]ka[/flag][flag]lt[/flag] and any Turkic language.

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Postby Ariki » 2005-02-17, 9:35

Aroha pukuranga!

Ku hoki mai a au!....I have returned!

Apologies for the long time inbetween this lesson and the last one. I can't speak fluent Hawai`ian, only basic, and I stress basic. I don't think I know enough to be a kumu (teacher) to be honest.

Todays lesson will be different from others and more challenging. No worries, kia ita(firm, strong)!. Don't worry pukuranga (students, disciples), take your time, and refer to the dictionary at www.rongorongo.org if necessary. Good luck!

How to construct a sentence in Rapa Nui.

In Eastern Polynesian languages, the preferred word order is Verb phrase (VP) - Noun phrase (NP) - Object/Comment e.g.

He oho atu (VP) a au ki te oneone (NP)

All Tense-Aspect-Markers (TAM) are verb particles, as well as most particles. All verb particles are generally put in to the preposed position. Sentences in Rapa Nui are -

Preposition - Base (words with real meaning) - Postposition

e.g.

He (vp, prepostion) kai (base) au (base) i (vp) te (np) maika (NP, base)

Todays lesson there is no translation given for the dialogue. Instead, for homework, you will have to translate the dialogue using the words I have given you and the grammatical structural analysis that I have given.

Kōrero

Ko Vaka he kimi atu ki tāna puka

Au&275; I hē tāku puka? I tikea mai au i te puka i te ote`a nei, noatu, ku ngaro atu a. I a ai tāku puka? Ki tōku manako i a Riu te puka. E, ka oho atu au kia ia, ka ui atu ki a ia angaiapō.

Ko Riu I Te Vaka
Ahoi e! Kaihini, e tomo atu mātou i a Anakena. Ku maitaki a anganirā. I marino te pari. He rivariva te puka ā Vaka. He nui rava. Ka ho`o au he kai māna. He ngaruhoa rivariva ia ki a au.

Translate the above passages.

Some more tenses (i.e. TAM)

Ku.....ana/a =
1/ perfective past e.g. ku maitaki a te huenga
2/ present tense (of wishing, desires) e.g. ku hangarahi ana au ki a koe!
He = present tense e.g. he tiaki au ki a ia
Ka = imperative, must e.g. ka rere atu te manu i te kurī
Kia = desiderative (used mostly with statives) e.g. kia riva! be good!

He Kupu Ho`ou

puka - book
mangō = shark
kaihini = soon (without delay)
āpō = tomorrow
veri, nehe = beautiful
aha = what
ahiahi = afternoon
ana = cave, den
ara = road, path
aka = root
ote`a = midday
hahau = wind, breeze
vaai = to give, to lend
hoi = horse
honu = turtle
pakia = seal (zoological)
horou = to be swift
ihu = nose
mata = eye
aringa = face
ivi = bone
kāinga = home, homeland, land
iti = small
ita = to be strong
moe = to lie down
hauru = to sleep
karanga = to call
kata = to laugh
kimi = to search, to investigate
mākona = to be satisfied, of eating food
me`e = thing

Guest

Postby Guest » 2005-04-02, 17:04

What has happened with this Vaananga Rapa Nui class? There's no reply many days ago.

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Postby Ariki » 2005-06-04, 1:18

`Iorana tātou ananake,

Please be aware that while these lessons are easy now, they will get much harder as we continue along

Ka api mai ki te vānanga Peretane - Translate to English!

Rehua : `Iorana e te ngaruhoa, pēhē koe i te ra`a nei?
Vaka : `Iorana, rivariva a au, pēhē?
Rehua : Riva rava au. He aha koe i te ra`a nei?
Vaka : He oho atu a au ki te hare hapi.
Rehua : He pukuranga koe?
Vaka : ee
Rehua : He haka`ite koe i te angaanga matakao?
Vaka : ina, he haka`ite au i te vānanga Tonga
Rehua : ne? E oho atu koe ki Tonga?
Vaka : ee, ku hanga ana a au mō oho atu ki reira. Ko te Henua O Tonga te ingoa ta`ato`a.
Rehua : Ko ai te ariki nui o Tonga?
Vaka : Ko Hōri Tupou te ariki nui o Tonga.
Rehua : nē!
Vaka : Ku kī atu ana koe ki Himene 'ka haere atu ia ki te hare o tana pāpā i te pō nei?
Rehua : āe, e haere atu ia i te pō nei.
Vaka : Auē, ka haere atu a au, he maruaki rava au i te hora nei, He hanga a ahau ki te kai i te puaka.
Rehua : Ekō vānanga mai!

Negator - Ekō

Ekō - Don't!

The rules for negation in Rapa Nui are different from those in Māori. For negating "kia" (desiderative e.g. kia riva! Be good!) the word order is fairly much the same between the three languages.

E.g.

(Don't Eat!)

Kaua e kai! - NZ Māori
`Auraka e kai! - CI Māori
Ekō e kai! - Rapa Nui

Manner Particles - Rava

Manner particles are generally placed after the words they modify. However, sometimes they can proceede the words they modify. We will deal with these particles later on in future lessons.

Rava - too (much), very e.g.

Kino rava = too bad! very bad!

He sentences - Existential Case

He sentences mark the existential cases in Rapa Nui, much as they do in NZ Māori.

He riva te puka = The book is good

He maori koe? = Are you a teacher?

n.b. maori does not mean māori - a native person of the Cook Islands, Aotearoa or Hawai`i

He Kupu Ho`ou

Api - to translate
Ee - yes (more correctly translated as 'yes, that is correct')
Pukuranga - student
Maori - a teacher
Ama - windward side of the canoe
Aroha - charity, love, care, respect, appreciate
Haere - to go, to journey, to leave, to come
Kī - to say, to tell
Henua - Kingdom
Koa - to rejoice, to be happy, to love
Hare Hapi - School (lit. learning house, studying house, teaching house)
Ma`a - to understand
Mataku - to be afraid
Mate - to die, to desire
Me`e - to do
Puaka - pig
Ao - dusk, midnight
Ra'a - Day
Tangi - to cry
Mahingo, hare - family (Extended), family (nuclear)
hare kai - restaurant, food house
Hiva - Foreign lands
vai - water,
ai - who
vaka - canoe, ship
manu tara - aeroplane
Mai - from, directional particle inferring "towards the speaker"
Manu - bird
Hua manu - egg
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

User avatar
Ariki
Posts: 2410
Joined: 2004-10-01, 14:53
Real Name: Tāne
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Country: NZ New Zealand (New Zealand / Aotearoa)

Postby Ariki » 2005-10-08, 23:45

Revision!

Translate the conversation below -

Tāne: `Iorana. Pēhē koe?
Va`ine: `Iorana. Rivariva au. Pēhē koe?
Tāne: Rivariva au. Kihē koe?
Va`ine: Ki te hare toa, ho`o kai ai. Kihē koe?
Tāne: He oho au mō te moana, kaukau ai. `Iorana!
Va`ine: `Iorana!
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

User avatar
Massimiliano B
Posts: 1752
Joined: 2009-03-31, 10:01
Real Name: Massimiliano Bavieri
Gender: male
Location: Lucca
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Ko Te Mara'e Vananga Rapa Nui - The Rapa Nui Language Mara'e

Postby Massimiliano B » 2017-10-19, 23:21



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