Hawaiian or NZ Maori for Tahitian

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silenus
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Hawaiian or NZ Maori for Tahitian

Postby silenus » 2010-12-04, 20:34

Hi everyone, wondering if anyone can answer this question: i want to learn Tahitian, but as there are no books/recordings available, i thought i should learn a similar language that has such resources. I am trying to decide between New Zealand Maori and Hawaiian. I read that Hawaiian has 76% lexical similarity to Tahitian and 71% with Maori. So NZ Maori has 71% similarity to Hawaiian but the figure to Tahitian was not included. Any suggestions???

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ILuvEire
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Re: Hawaiian or NZ Maori for Tahitian

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-12-04, 22:31

silenus wrote:Hi everyone, wondering if anyone can answer this question: i want to learn Tahitian, but as there are no books/recordings available, i thought i should learn a similar language that has such resources. I am trying to decide between New Zealand Maori and Hawaiian. I read that Hawaiian has 76% lexical similarity to Tahitian and 71% with Maori. So NZ Maori has 71% similarity to Hawaiian but the figure to Tahitian was not included. Any suggestions???

Well, I can say that Hawai‘ian is my favorite Polynesian language followed closely by Tahitian! And they really are very similar lexically and vocabularily (is that a word? I making it one) however grammatically they seem to be a bit more divergent.

What are your favorite things about Tahitian? If it's just the sound and culture, Hawaiian is the way to go, however I do believe that NZ Māori has a much more similar grammar. All in all, I say learn Hawaiian anyway :]
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kahihi'o
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Re: Hawaiian or NZ Maori for Tahitian

Postby kahihi'o » 2010-12-10, 4:52

Learning Māori or Hawaiian as a substitute for Tahitian might not be your best bet if you're truly set on learning Tahitian. There are Tahitian grammars, dictionaries and course books, but finding them might take a bit more digging. My old school's library had these available, but we also had a Pacific language section (because I live in Hawaiʻi). Here is a short list of some Tahitian language literature to help you with your search. http://www2.ling.su.se/pollinet/facts/tah.html.
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Re: Hawaiian or NZ Maori for Tahitian

Postby Ariki » 2011-01-19, 21:53

kahihi'o wrote:Learning Māori or Hawaiian as a substitute for Tahitian might not be your best bet if you're truly set on learning Tahitian. There are Tahitian grammars, dictionaries and course books, but finding them might take a bit more digging. My old school's library had these available, but we also had a Pacific language section (because I live in Hawaiʻi). Here is a short list of some Tahitian language literature to help you with your search. http://www2.ling.su.se/pollinet/facts/tah.html.


I agree with Kahihi'o however I do add that in the event that you can't find anything on Tahitian then your best bet to bridge your way over to Tahitian is to go via either Hawaiian or NZ Maori. However I would recommend that you consider a third language instead, Cook Islands Maori (which I admit does not have has many resources as either Hawaiian or NZ Maori). My reason for suggesting Cook Islands Maori is that it and Tahitian from what I have seen and heard use an identical grammatical system - where there are differences they are not difficult to overcome.

Cook Islands Maori also shows much more of its vocab with Tahitian than either Hawaiian or NZ Maori.
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