Malagasy

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Riptide
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Malagasy

Postby Riptide » 2010-02-26, 21:10

[flag]mg[/flag] Manao ahoana daholo!

Well, the Malagasy language has fascinated me for quite a while now, so I thought I should make a topic for it. It's the only Austronesian language spoken in Africa. It's the national language of Madagascar. It's not so easy to find sources on the language, but I've managed to find a few. Anyone interested in learning Malagasy?

I might post a few lessons like I did with Chamorro, and if enough people are interested, I'll continue with the lessons.

Veloma tompoko! :)
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Re: Malagasy

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2010-02-26, 22:29

I think you should post a couple lessons to begin with, I'd like to get to know more about it. :) Because Bryon and I need an Austronesian language to learn in the future. :D
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Re: Malagasy

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-02-26, 22:56

Riptide, ay, slow down, slow down! You're switching languages like the wind! Give 'em some time!

[Although I can't argue with your choices, you've got great taste. Austronesian ftw. <3]
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Re: Malagasy

Postby Riptide » 2010-02-27, 3:33

Sean of the Dead wrote:I think you should post a couple lessons to begin with, I'd like to get to know more about it. :) Because Bryon and I need an Austronesian language to learn in the future. :D

Yeah, sure thing. I just hope some other people gain interest in this language. Also, have you ever considered the Austronesian language Tagalog? :P
ILuvEire wrote:Riptide, ay, slow down, slow down! You're switching languages like the wind! Give 'em some time!

[Although I can't argue with your choices, you've got great taste. Austronesian ftw. <3]

I'm not switching around necessarily. I'm just exploring. :) My main 3 languages, Spanish, Tagalog, and Romanian, have remained the same. Also, I haven't gotten tired of Danish, although I would like to practice pronunciation with a native soon. But I like to think of Malagasy as more of an experimental language.
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Re: Malagasy

Postby Riptide » 2010-03-01, 11:11

The Malagasy Alphabet

a /a/
b /b/
d /d/
e /e/
f /f/
g /g/
h /h/
i /i/
j /dz/
k /k/
l /l/
m /m/
n /n/
o /u/
p /p/
r /r/
s /s/
t /t/
v /v/
y /j/ or /i/
z /z/

There are also a few vowel and consonant combinations you should know, which can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malagasy_l ... #Phonology

Now try pronouncing these phrases:
Hello - Manahoana
How are you? - Fahasalamana?
I'm ok, thanks. And you? - Tsara fa misaotra! Sy ary ianao?
No problem! - Tsy misy olana!
Welcome! - Tonga soa!
Bye! - Veloa!
I am learning Malagasy. - Mianatra teny Malagasy aho.
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Re: Malagasy

Postby daniellle » 2010-03-04, 2:49

Malala salama :) :whistle:

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Re: Malagasy

Postby Riptide » 2010-03-04, 5:08

Tsy misy olana! Do you speak Malagasy?
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Re: Malagasy

Postby Riptide » 2010-05-22, 23:21

Well, even though there hasn't been any expressed interest in this, I thought I'd continue by adding the numbers system because I'm still interested in the language.

The Malagasy Numbers

0 - aotra
1 - iray
2 - roa
3 - telo
4 - efatra
5 - dimy
6 - enina
7 - fito
8 - valo
9 - sivy
10 - folo
11 - iraika ambin'ny folo
12 - roa ambin'ny folo
20 - roapolo
25 - dimy amby roapolo
30 - telopolo
40 - efapolo
50 - dimampolo
60 - enimpolo
70 - fitopolo
80 - valopolo
90 - sivifolo
100 - zato
101 - iraika amby zato
105 - dimy amby zato
200 - roanjato
300 - telonjato
400 - efajato
500 - dimanjato
600 - eninjato
700 - fitonjato
800 - valonjato
900 - sivinjato
1000 - arivo
10000 - iray alina
100000 - iray hetsy
1000000 - iray tapitrisa

More to come soon! :)
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Re: Malagasy

Postby Satsuma » 2010-05-23, 3:01

Riptide wrote:Well, even though there hasn't been any expressed interest in this, I thought I'd continue by adding the numbers system because I'm still interested in the language.

I'm interested :) However, the main obstacle that's holding me back from learning Malagasy is the lack of (easily obtainable, not too expensive, quality) materials I can find.

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Re: Malagasy

Postby ILuvEire » 2010-05-23, 5:05

I'm interested as well! I don't plan to learn any Malagasy, but I've got a huge scholarly interest in any Austronesian language, and especially one so far removed from the rest of the family.
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Re: Malagasy

Postby księżycowy » 2010-05-29, 13:44

Just happened to come across this thread the other day, and seeing as I found a good resource for learning Malagasy, I figured I'd pass it along.
It's at ERIC, here

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Re: Malagasy

Postby Riptide » 2010-05-30, 19:24

Thanks for that księżycowy. And I'm glad to see some people have an interest in the language (despite not really wanting to learn it, but that's still good. Anyways, now for the personal pronouns. By the way, I think I'm missing some personal pronouns, so I'll add it if I find it.

The Malagasy Personal Pronouns

Accusative:
1ps: aho
2ps: ianao
3ps: izy
1ppe: izahay
1ppi: isika
2pp: ianareo
3pp: izy ireo

Post-Clitic (attached to the ends of nouns and verbs):
1ps: -ko
2ps: -nao
3ps: -ny
1ppe: -nay
1ppi: -ntsika
2pp: -nareo
3pp: -ny

Also, if you have any questions about the Malagasy language, or have any requests about what I should post about the language, I would be glad to try to answer your questions and consider your suggestions.
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Re: Malagasy

Postby Unknown » 2011-07-03, 20:06

Thanks riptide for the lessons. They are all correct, so good job. I also do speak Malagasy and if anyone needs help in the language, I will be glad to help you and so would riptide.

Miteny Malagasy aho, sy mba nampy Malagasy ianareo aho. Misaotra tompoko. :)
Last edited by Unknown on 2011-07-04, 12:21, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Malagasy

Postby Unknown » 2011-07-03, 22:01

Ok folks I'll be starting Malagasy lessons and I hope you like them. The lesson riptide posted above will be called Lesson 1.


Lesson 2: Important beginner verbs

This is a beginner verb list put together that I posted to riptide comprised of a few beginner verbs, so I am going to post it on here for this lesson. These are verbs you can work with as of now.

Malagasy Beginner Verbs:

-iteny - speak
-avony - wash
-ividy - buy
-amaky - read
-anampy - help
-zoko - do
-iako - like/love
-ianatra - learn

So now the verb tense prefixes:

m-(verb) = present (except for verbs that originally start with "a" (a- being the present tense) or "ia" (tia- being the present tense))
n-(verb) = past
h-(verb) = future

End of second lesson
Last edited by Unknown on 2011-08-28, 20:11, edited 9 times in total.

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Re: Malagasy

Postby Tenebrarum » 2011-07-03, 22:10

Riptide wrote:The Malagasy Numbers

0 - aotra
1 - iray
2 - roa
3 - telo
4 - efatra
5 - dimy
6 - enina
7 - fito
8 - valo
9 - sivy
10 - folo

I remember seeing somewhere, maybe Wikipedia, that the orthography is not what it seems. The <a> at the end is silent if it comes after a consonant, so that gives us aotr', efatr' and enin'. Same thing happens to <o>: telo is /tɛlʷ/, fito is /fitʷ/ etc.
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Re: Malagasy

Postby Unknown » 2011-07-04, 1:21

Draven wrote:
Riptide wrote:The Malagasy Numbers

0 - aotra
1 - iray
2 - roa
3 - telo
4 - efatra
5 - dimy
6 - enina
7 - fito
8 - valo
9 - sivy
10 - folo

I remember seeing somewhere, maybe Wikipedia, that the orthography is not what it seems. The <a> at the end is silent if it comes after a consonant, so that gives us aotr', efatr' and enin'. Same thing happens to <o>: telo is /tɛlʷ/, fito is /fitʷ/ etc.


Yes that is right. This can prove the point that vowels are a HUGE thing in Malagasy. ;)

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Re: Malagasy

Postby Unknown » 2011-07-04, 2:34

Lesson 3: Introduction Submission

Now we will be boosting vocabulary. This is a beginner submission I put together for this purpose, and I am introducing myself but also saying something extra:



Tafandria mandry tompoko, Cesare no anarko.  Faly mahafantatra anao.  Avy any Kanada aho.  Ninatra any boky Malagasy aho.  Valo ambin'iny folo taona aho sy manana autism aho.  Miako musika sy fiteny, sy miteny sivy ambin'iny enimpolo fiteny aho.  Miako vehivavy aho.    Mangatsiaka loatra ny Kanada.  Misaotra tompoko.  


Now let's break it down with our knives!:

Tafandria mandry tompoko - Good evening
Anarko - My name is
Mahafantatra - to be knowing
Faly - Glad
-vy - to come
any/ny - From
boky - book
taona - year(s)
-nana - to have
vehivavy - woman/women
fiteny - language(s)
mangatsiaka - weather
loatra - cold

End of third lesson

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Re: Malagasy

Postby Riptide » 2011-07-04, 3:44

Tafandria mandry tompoko Cesare! Great beginner lesson! Hopefully, you will be making more in the future. Mila anatra malagasy... 8-)
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Re: Malagasy

Postby Unknown » 2011-07-04, 11:57

Lesson 4: Sentence Construction


So now we learn how a sentence is put together in Malagasy. First off, the main word order is a very unusual one, in my opinion. The word order is VOS (Verb-Object-Subject). So it seems like it can be tricky for learners to try and converse the first time because of that word order. Now at times, the words can be switched around as you know to convey the exact same meaning. This is an example taken from Wikipedia.


The following are three translations for the sentence "I wash my hands with soap":

"Manasa amin'ny savony ny tanako aho" (I wash my hands with soap) 
"Sasako amin'ny savony ny tanako" (My hands are washed with soap by me)
"Anasako ny tanako ny savony manasa" (It is with soap that my hands are washed by me)


In this example, each of the three translations have the words switched around differently because in Malagasy, verbs have three productive voice forms (also known as the three case focuses), and these forms are used according to the role of theme they play in the sentence, and as for the example above; the English literal translation beside each sentence shows what word has the emphasis, because all the forms are dependent by a different case.


Here are the three productive voice forms:

Agent focus - covers most Malagasy verbs
Patient focus - covers passive constructions
Goal focus - derived forms that cover constructions with instrumentality focus


So by the definitions being placed beside the three terms, this is what it's meant by being dependent by a different case. Each focus type is determined by the sentence initial verb form and the sentence final (noun) argument.


Now for a glossary breakdown of the translated example:

-anasa/-asako - wash
ny savony - soap
ny tanako - (my) hands


End of fourth lesson
Last edited by Unknown on 2011-07-04, 16:12, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Malagasy

Postby Unknown » 2011-07-04, 12:13

And now for the first quiz...

Lesson 1-4 Quiz:

1. Translate the following submission:

"Hello, my name is Mark. I am twenty years old and I am from the U.S. I speak English and Malagasy. It is very cold, and I love women."


2. Translate the following terms:

a) -anasa/-asako
b) -ividy
c) ny zaza
d) tsara fa misaotra
e) efatra ambin'iny dimampolo
f) taona
g) ny boky
h) izahay
i) -inareo

3. List the three verb tense prefixes and their meaning


4. List the three productive voice forms and their meaning


5. Translate the following terms into Malagasy:

a) No problem!
b) 47
c) (my) hands
d) language(s)
e) to learn
f) to help
g) we (post clitic first person plural)

Good luck! ;)
Last edited by Unknown on 2011-07-04, 16:23, edited 2 times in total.


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