translation

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dukemasuya
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translation

Postby dukemasuya » 2007-11-29, 1:10

How would you say:
-When does the program start?
-Where does "ke ea Hawai'i" begin?

and btw, what is ke ea hawai'i? mahalo!

Mamo
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Re: translation

Postby Mamo » 2008-01-10, 7:39

dukemasuya wrote:How would you say:
-When does the program start?
-Where does "ke ea Hawai'i" begin?

and btw, what is ke ea hawai'i? mahalo!


Āhea e ho‘omaka ai ka polokalamu?

When does the program start?

Āhea e ho‘omaka ai ke ea Hawai‘i?

When does ke ea Hawai‘i begin.

“Ke ea Hawai‘i” typically means “Hawaiian independence/sovereignty,” but ea also means “life” and “air.”

dukemasuya
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Re: translation

Postby dukemasuya » 2008-01-10, 8:42

Mamo wrote:
dukemasuya wrote:How would you say:
-When does the program start?
-Where does "ke ea Hawai'i" begin?

and btw, what is ke ea hawai'i? mahalo!


Āhea e ho‘omaka ai ka polokalamu?

When does the program start?

Āhea e ho‘omaka ai ke ea Hawai‘i?

When does ke ea Hawai‘i begin.

“Ke ea Hawai‘i” typically means “Hawaiian independence/sovereignty,” but ea also means “life” and “air.”


I meant "Where does ke ea Hawai'i begin?". And what I actually meant to ask was what exactly is Hawaiian sovreignty? I heard that it's a big issue but whoever mentioned it didn't explain what it actually was and what significance it has to Hawaii these days.

Oh and I was also wondering if someone could translate:
- I promise that .....
- How much does this cost?
- It costs 3 dollars.
- What is your telephone number?
- My telephone number is .....
- Paul is annoying me.

..into Hawaiian. Mahalo in advance. :D

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Re: translation

Postby Mamo » 2008-01-10, 11:14

dukemasuya wrote:
Mamo wrote:
dukemasuya wrote:How would you say:
-When does the program start?
-Where does "ke ea Hawai'i" begin?

and btw, what is ke ea hawai'i? mahalo!


Āhea e ho‘omaka ai ka polokalamu?

When does the program start?

Āhea e ho‘omaka ai ke ea Hawai‘i?

When does ke ea Hawai‘i begin.

“Ke ea Hawai‘i” typically means “Hawaiian independence/sovereignty,” but ea also means “life” and “air.”


I meant "Where does ke ea Hawai'i begin?". And what I actually meant to ask was what exactly is Hawaiian sovreignty? I heard that it's a big issue but whoever mentioned it didn't explain what it actually was and what significance it has to Hawaii these days.

Oh and I was also wondering if someone could translate:
- I promise that .....
- How much does this cost?
- It costs 3 dollars.
- What is your telephone number?
- My telephone number is .....
- Paul is annoying me.

..into Hawaiian. Mahalo in advance. :D


Aia i hea lā e ho'omaka ai ke ea Hawai'i.

Where does Hawaiian sovereignty begin.

Generally, it's talking about political independence of people with Hawaiian ancestry. In reference to its deeper meanings, or anything attached to it, I do my best to stay out of it since I'm not really the political type. Sorry, I know that's not the answer you wanted. :(

Ke ho‘ohiki nei au/ Ho‘ohiki au.
I promise.

Pehea ke kumukū‘ai o kēia?
How much does this cost?

‘Ekolu kālā (ke kumukū‘ai)no kēia.
This costs ten dollars.

He aha kou helu kelepona?
What is your phone number?

‘O ko‘u helu kelepona, …(I know it looks weird because it's an o-possessive, but apparently phone numbers fall into the o-class).
My telephone number is …

Ke ho‘onāukiuki mai nei ‘o Paul ia‘u.
Paul is annoying me.

dukemasuya
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Re: translation

Postby dukemasuya » 2008-01-10, 11:45

Ke ho‘ohiki nei au/ Ho‘ohiki au.
I promise.


So how would you say:

I promise that I will read my Bible everyday.

And don't worry about the "Hawaiian sovreignty" question! I understand that some people have diferent opinions or would rather stay out of it entirely so need to fret over it. Mahalo again!

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Re: translation

Postby Mamo » 2008-01-10, 12:00

dukemasuya wrote:
Ke ho‘ohiki nei au/ Ho‘ohiki au.
I promise.


So how would you say:

I promise that I will read my Bible everyday.

And don't worry about the "Hawaiian sovreignty" question! I understand that some people have diferent opinions or would rather stay out of it entirely so need to fret over it. Mahalo again!


Ho‘ohiki au, e heluhelu au i ko‘u Paipala i nā lā a pau.
I promise, I will read my Bible everyday.

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Ariki
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Postby Ariki » 2008-01-10, 12:56

Ea in Proto-Central Eastern Polynesian meant "to rise up out of water, to appear above water".

Looking at related daughter languages, this meaning is mostly retained, including Hawaiian (with a very slight change in meaning to just "rise, raise"). Its an intransitive verb. In Tahitian and Māori, when the causative prefix is added (fa'a/whaka), it means "to breathe" (when a person appears above water and they start drawing in air). In Tahitian, fa'aeaea means "to rest" (literally to breathe for an extended amount of time).
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Aleco
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Postby Aleco » 2008-01-10, 21:11

[ot] In Niuean: to appear or emerge :wink: [/ot]
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Postby Ariki » 2008-01-11, 3:54

I'm going to quote directly from another source then :P

EAS = Rapa Nui
ECE = Tuvaluan
EFU = East Futunan
EUV = East Uvean
HAW = Hawaiian
MAE = Emae
MAO = Māori
MQA = Marquesan
MVA = Mangarevan
NIU = Niuean
NKO = Nukuoro
PEN = Tongarevan
PIL = Pileni
PUK = Pukapukan
RAR = Cook Islands Māori
REN = Rennellese
SAM = Samoan
SIK = Sikaiana
TAH = Tahitian
TOK = Tokelauan
TON = Tongan
TUA = Tuamotuan
WEV = West Uvean

.PN EQA :Emerge, appear on surface of water after being submerged.
*8 Note. WEV not attested by (Hmn).
EAS E`a. :Come out, get up.
ECE Ea. :Rise, grow (as a sandbank) (Bsr).
EFU `Ea. :Appear (Bgs).
EUV `Ea. :Outre-perce. Perce de part en part (Rch).
HAW Ea. :Rise, go up, become erect; sovereignty, independance; life, breath, spirit (Pki).
MAE Ea. :To surface, come up for air (Clk).
MAO Ea. :Appear above surface of water, horizon (of heavenly bodies); reappear; be requited, avenged (Bgs).
MQA Ea. :Rise to surface of water.
MVA Ea. :Take in air (of a diver) (Jnu).
NIU Ea. :Rise, appear, emerge.
NKO Ea. :Broach surface of water.
PEN Ea. :Rise to surface of water.
PIL Ea. :Come (to surface) (Ebt).
PUK Ea. :Emerge; rise to the surface (Mta).
RAR Ea. :Rise to the surface (Bse).
REN E`a. :Appear, come, go, arrive, penetrate (Ebt).
SAM Ea. :Rise to the surface.
SIK Ea. :Come to surface of water.
TAH Ea. :Be healthy, at liberty; healed, saved, delivered (Dvs).
TOK Ea. :Rise up (Jen).
TON E`a. :Show v., exposed, to be.
TUA Ea. :Emerge, appear, rise.
WEV Ea. :Emerge above surface.
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.

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Postby Mamo » 2008-01-11, 5:59

riki wrote:Ea in Proto-Central Eastern Polynesian meant "to rise up out of water, to appear above water".

Looking at related daughter languages, this meaning is mostly retained, including Hawaiian (with a very slight change in meaning to just "rise, raise"). Its an intransitive verb. In Tahitian and Māori, when the causative prefix is added (fa'a/whaka), it means "to breathe" (when a person appears above water and they start drawing in air). In Tahitian, fa'aeaea means "to rest" (literally to breathe for an extended amount of time).


Hey, that is pretty interesting. So do you think that its meaning for "air" in Hawaiian is this ea, and not a transliteration from English? I've never thought about that before.

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Aleco
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Postby Aleco » 2008-01-11, 14:13

It is! :shock: Weird it has been kept in all the languages...
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Postby Mamo » 2008-01-12, 5:58

It is true that ea now means to rise up generally, but it would still be used when talking about surfacing from under water. Another version of the word for us is aea:
wehewehe.org wrote:aea
vi. To rise up; to raise the head; to come up from under water. Luʻu aku a aea mai (song), dive down and come up.

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Postby Ariki » 2008-01-13, 8:29

Polynesian languages generally tend to be conservative. The break up of language groups is only recent. For example, Moriori only split from New Zealand Maori 500 years ago and has cognates with Hawaiian not found in Maori (such as taiti for "child" = HAW "keiki").

When speakers of Tahitian and Maori came into contact with each other again in the 1700s, it had only been 500 years since both language groups had split. Tahitian was still very recognizable to speakers of Maori as the Tahitian used by Tupaia when he travelled with Captain Cook hadn't under gone extensive change through the naming taboo system that would be more strenuously enforced on Tahiti by Pomare 30 years later. Banks, the Endeavour's botanist, noted that Maori and Tahitian sounded identical, save Tahitian lacked k and ng, but nevertheless, they felt both groups of people spoke dialects of the same language.
Linguicide IS genocide. :)

He ingoa ōpaki a Riki; he ingoa ōkawa a Ariki.

Riki is an informal name; Ariki is a formal name.


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