Akkadian

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Postby Babelfish » 2007-11-18, 15:39

osias wrote:I read there's no verb like "to be" in Arabic. A sentence like "I am student" is "ana talib", with no verb.

At first I thought it was a feature of semitic languages, but yesterday reading a French Bible I remembered God tells to Moses "My name is 'I Am'", so the thing exists in Hebrew.

What about Akkadian?

The verb 'to be' isn't used in Hebrew in the present tense (except maybe one place the Bible). Technically a present form of 'to be' can be constructed, but like you've said about Arabic (and actually in Russian too...), it's left out. The sentence you mentioned is, I guess, a translation of the Hebrew "אהיה אשר אהיה" which literally means "I'll be what[ever] I'll be".

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Postby Osias » 2007-11-19, 10:05

thanks!
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Postby kalemiye » 2007-11-23, 14:18

According to the grammars I've checked (Caplice's akkadian grammar and another one published recently in Spain) it seems that Akkadian does the same Arabic and Hebrew do: there is not verb "to be" expressed in the present time.

Sarru damiq = the/a king is good.

To express the subject I use the nominative and to write the "object" i just write the adjective without declension.

If I put declension in both it wouldn't be a nominal sentence:

Sarru damqu = the/a good king.

If someone is interested on it, I can upload Caplice's grammar to upitus.com for you to download or send it via email. Write me a pm or post in this thread your requests :D.
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Re: Akkadian

Postby ''' » 2008-08-29, 17:52

don't forget hittite.

I think Assyrian/Akkadian would eb easier for Semitic people since they are semitic languages. Hittie is I-E which makes it easier for me.

Summerian is the holy grail since it is a language isolate (like Korean and Basque)
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Re: Akkadian

Postby kalemiye » 2008-10-07, 10:33

''' wrote:don't forget hittite.

I think Assyrian/Akkadian would eb easier for Semitic people since they are semitic languages. Hittie is I-E which makes it easier for me.

Summerian is the holy grail since it is a language isolate (like Korean and Basque)

Do you study Hıttıte?
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Re: Akkadian

Postby Meera » 2012-07-05, 5:21

I took a class on ancient Mesopotamia in school and I got really interested in the langauges. The cuneiform script is really beautiful too.
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Re: Akkadian

Postby Meera » 2012-07-05, 5:44

Also anyone who is interested in Mesopotamian History, I recomend this site:
http://www.theiraqmuseum.com/

It has a a feauture that lets you walk through the museam and has a buncg of exibhits on Mesopotamia :mrgreen:

This site is also quite good:
http://www.virtualmuseumiraq.cnr.it/homeENG.htm
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Re: Akkadian

Postby Lur » 2013-01-24, 15:36

Someone translated the One Ring inscription into Akkadian.
Geurea dena lapurtzen uzteagatik, geure izaerari uko egiteagatik.

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Re: Akkadian

Postby Lauren » 2013-01-24, 22:31

Luke wrote:Someone translated the One Ring inscription into Akkadian.

That's awesome! I wonder what other things people have translated into Akkadian.

When I get good I'd love to translate The Little Prince, one of my favorite books. :)
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Postby mōdgethanc » 2013-07-22, 14:31

Babelfish wrote:Cool! 8) Not that I intend to get into Akkadian anytime soon (Hebrew, Arabic and Amharic are enough Semitic languages to know/learn :lol: ) but it's interesting to know, for instance, that Akkadian too had case-endings - in fact, almost identical to those of Standard Arabic. Hebrew has none whatsoever, and Amharic only has an accusative mark -n which in Arabic indicates definiteness... So it seemed to me peculiar to Arabic.
No, it marks indefiniteness. The definite article in Arabic is, of course, al-.
It's funny though how the grammars seem "German" in attitude :lol: giving Nominative, Accusative, Genitive and even "Dative" case-forms for pronouns, for example. I hope the following note would be more helpful than confusing: Semitic languages (at least those I know a bit of) don't really decline pronouns, but rather attach them to prepositions. Thus "to me" in Hebrew is the just the preposition "lə" + pronominal suffix "-i" = "li" :) In Amharic it's "lä" + "əne" = "läne", using the full pronoun.
Well, to be fair Arabic (and Proto-Semitic, possibly some other older Semitic languages like Ugaritic or something) had those three cases. The Semitic languages don't have a true dative though, you're right about that. Those are just clitics.

AFAIK, Classical Arabic is the only member of the family that has preserved the case system of PS. Even MSA hardly ever uses it except the indefinite accusative marker -an is still written with an alif and in some contexts pronounced that way (in some words it's frozen, like ahlan and shukran.

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Re: Akkadian

Postby Bijlee » 2013-08-21, 2:49

Anyone know a good textbook for Akkadian that teaches cuneiform?

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Re: Akkadian

Postby księżycowy » 2013-08-21, 10:24

A Grammar of Akkadian by Huehnergard

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Re: Akkadian

Postby mōdgethanc » 2013-08-21, 14:05

Lur wrote:Someone translated the One Ring inscription into Akkadian.
You mean it wasn't in it already?
When I get good I'd love to translate The Little Prince, one of my favorite books. :)
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Re: Akkadian

Postby Bijlee » 2013-08-22, 21:11

księżycowy wrote:A Grammar of Akkadian by Huehnergard

Thank you! :mrgreen:
I will check it out.

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Re: Akkadian

Postby księżycowy » 2013-08-22, 22:28

There is also a cheaper, shorter book too. The name escapes me, but Huehnergard is the best textbook I've seen for Akkadian hands down.

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Re: Akkadian

Postby Karavinka » 2013-11-03, 1:53

Huehnergard looks great on the shelf and it's very comprehensive, but being too comprehensive is probably not the best thing for an absolute beginner, especially without someone to help you. That said, there is a separate key published for Huehnergard, and he made a list of Semitic cognates for his chapter vocabularies online as well, so in the long run you might want to get into it.

But Huehnergard is a big investment of money, so before you jump into it, check out some lighter sources. This is an excellent one:

http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/saao/knpp ... mrevealed/

Most Akkadian materials I have seen so far do teach cuneiform as well. Caplice is a bit short but decent, and A Manual of Akkadian by David Marcus as well. Teach Yourself Babylonian keeps everything in transliteration/transcription, but grammar-wise it's not a bad book either.
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Re: Akkadian

Postby Bijlee » 2013-11-03, 2:09

Karavinka wrote:Huehnergard looks great on the shelf and it's very comprehensive, but being too comprehensive is probably not the best thing for an absolute beginner, especially without someone to help you. That said, there is a separate key published for Huehnergard, and he made a list of Semitic cognates for his chapter vocabularies online as well, so in the long run you might want to get into it.

But Huehnergard is a big investment of money, so before you jump into it, check out some lighter sources. This is an excellent one:

http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/saao/knpp ... mrevealed/

Most Akkadian materials I have seen so far do teach cuneiform as well. Caplice is a bit short but decent, and A Manual of Akkadian by David Marcus as well. Teach Yourself Babylonian keeps everything in transliteration/transcription, but grammar-wise it's not a bad book either.


Many thanks, Karavinka! That website looks good. I was using Teach Yourself Babylonian some year or so ago and it frustrated me that it didn't use Cuneiform. I love the writing. Though I don't intend on learning Akkadian (at least not now). For now, it is just nice for looking...


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