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Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-11-21, 2:25
by sa wulfs
Hey guys, any chance you stick around and learn Old English or something? It's so lonely here. We can read poetry! Or about a bishop blaming the sinners for the viking invasions! It'll be fun.

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-11-21, 2:34
by Dunbots
Actually, I was thinking about learning either Old English or Old Norse, but I might already have enough with my current 3. On the other hand, I have tons of free time everyday, so possibly. :)

Are there any good course/textbooks for Old English? I have lots for Old Norse/Icelandic, but I only have the 1960's version of Teach Yourself Old English, and a bilingual copy of Beowulf. Those might be enough though; Old English isn't that hard.

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-11-21, 4:01
by KingHarvest
sa wulfs wrote:Hey guys, any chance you stick around and learn Old English or something? It's so lonely here. We can read poetry! Or about a bishop blaming the sinners for the viking invasions! It'll be fun.


Buy me and mail me things to read in Old English and I will (not Beowulf though, it is so boring).

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-11-21, 10:28
by sa wulfs

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-11-21, 14:37
by Muisje
I'm going to take a course called 'English from Old to New' next semester (February). That's probably more passive knowledge though, and I have no idea how much of it will be about Old English. But hey, I might sneak in here a couple times.

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-11-24, 18:28
by ILuvEire
johnH wrote:Anyway… I know that wasn't middle English actually if I’m not mistaken old English is considered a different language while middle English is considered a to be closer to a dialect of modern English that when spoken correctly is for people who aren't use to it relatively difficult to understand.
Actually I’m pretty sure I know something about language. Actually enjoyeth, the ~eth would be omitted in translation. if I’m not mistaken that’s some like the definite article applied to a verb. :lol: , which I admit I don't yet understand. In old Norse that was used. The English they used in the bible supposedly meant to sound arcane if not outright Snobbish at the time. Which is curious* considering that the English in that version of the bible was actually translated to make it more accessible to the people at the time.
I’m not certainly not willfully ignorant, and I was well aware that I didn't sound very good when saying that.

*what is just as curious is that you guys keep saying I should learn modern English. I actually speak it just at the very least quite fluently. Actually speaking even modern English in the style I meant to imitate would be pretty difficult. In part because much of the grammar and vocabulary is simple omitted misused or left out semi-willfully by habit and imitation.

Actually on that topic, continue speaking old english, didn't mean to distract you. :whistle: carry on.


Image

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-11-24, 19:12
by sa wulfs
ILuvEire wrote:Image

Fixed.

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-11-24, 20:43
by johnH
:lol: Hwæt am Laughe I about?
[forgive me for I not doe, thine old tong. As demonstrated by my very bad grammar.]

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-12-20, 17:14
by TeneReef
hwat is so Southern US/South Island NZ / Ottawa Valley / Scotland. :yep: :)

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-12-20, 17:53
by KingHarvest
Who said it wasn't?

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-12-20, 18:28
by mōdgethanc
Buy me and mail me things to read in Old English and I will
Or you could use the Internet!
(not Beowulf though, it is so boring).
Uh-uh, sorry, but I'm gonna have to digress on this one!

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-12-29, 23:00
by księżycowy
I'm looking to get into some Old English eventually. Right now I want to get a few resources to use. I already have Teach Yourself Old English, is it a good textbook to use?

An other recommendations?

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-12-30, 6:40
by ILuvEire
A Guide to Old English by Bruce Mitchell is absolutely amazing.

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-12-30, 10:50
by księżycowy
ILuvEire wrote:A Guide to Old English by Bruce Mitchell is absolutely amazing.

I've honestly been eying that book. I'll give it a shot, thanks! 8-)

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-12-30, 12:21
by sa wulfs
It's a great book. I stole it from the library 5 years ago and I basically learned 90% of what I know from it.

Another book I'd recommend is Introduction to Old English by Peter Baker. Of course, in many ways it overlaps with Mitchell's book, but it contains much more information on phonology and, in my opinion, a better selection of texts.

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2010-12-30, 12:56
by księżycowy
sa wulfs wrote:Another book I'd recommend is Introduction to Old English by Peter Baker.

Yet another one I've been eying. Not sure which I'll get first, but I think I will get them. Thanks sa wulfs!

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2011-01-20, 14:25
by Saegrund
There is an online version of Baker's book at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/resources/IOE/index.html

He also has some grammar exercises up and texts with notes (click on words or phrases for notes).

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2011-03-08, 15:35
by Lenguas
Dunbots wrote:Old English isn't that hard.


How hard is it exactly? I've been looking at it, and it looks pretty hard.

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2011-03-11, 10:21
by sa wulfs
"How hard is it exactly"? Uh? What do you mean, on the Ron Jeremy Scale of Hardness?

Re: Old English Discussion

Posted: 2011-03-11, 15:19
by Lenguas
Compared to other languages, such as German, Dutch, French, etc., for someone who already knows Modern English.