papiamentu language learning

User avatar
E}{pugnator
Posts: 2077
Joined: 2002-06-24, 17:27
Real Name: Expug
Gender: male
Location: Vitoria da Conquista (living in Belo Horizonte)
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)

Re: papiamentu language learning

Postby E}{pugnator » 2013-04-04, 19:03

So, I've started learning Papiamento actively! I plan to go to Aruban in a few months, if things work out well. I've read "Getting around the islands in Papiamento" and now i'm studying from "Papiamento Textbook".

I still don't have audio! Not even for listening to the very simple sentences. I have no idea how can I make the tones in the verbs, they are different and it's important not to confuse them, as the stress is not at the same place as one would expect in Portuguese and Spanish.
Learning Georgian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Papiamentu from scratch. Trying to brush up my Norwegian up to an advanced level.

El Viento
Posts: 6
Joined: 2012-10-27, 22:31
Real Name: Aaron M. de Windt
Gender: male
Location: Willemstad, Curacao
Country: AN Netherlands Antilles (Nederlandse Antillen)

Re: papiamentu language learning

Postby El Viento » 2013-04-08, 16:07

These two orthographies should be the only ones now, but it's common on all three islands that people will mix them up and not write 100% phonetically or 100% etymologically. This happens usually when writing informally. This is more common in the older generations since papiamentu has only been part of the education system for only two decades. Although reading either of them should not be too difficult.

I don't know too much of how the papiamentu looked like in the past. But a couple of years ago our papiamentu teacher at my high school showed us the oldest letter/document written in papiamentu. In this case it was a love letter and it was difficult to understand what it said. It was certainly different from current papiamentu and really etymological with in my opinion more much germanic words than current papiamentu (could have also been than the guy that wrote it just used more germanic words). As the years passed papiamentu began borrowing more and more spanish words until in begin or mid 20th century there were people that began to feel that papiamentu was being replaced by spanish. Here is when efforts to standardize the language began. Which resulted in the two current main standards.

If you want to hear papiamentu. I recommend you to just browse the internet and look for videos. The youtube channel of tele Curacao is a good source of videos in papiamentu, most is local news but you might find something else there. Some local radio channels also stream online, which you can hear at http://www.basilachill.com.

El Viento
Posts: 6
Joined: 2012-10-27, 22:31
Real Name: Aaron M. de Windt
Gender: male
Location: Willemstad, Curacao
Country: AN Netherlands Antilles (Nederlandse Antillen)

Re: papiamentu language learning

Postby El Viento » 2013-04-08, 16:39

You might also like this. It's a stand up comedy sketch in papiamentu by a comedian from the brazilian Mtv channel (Marcelo Adnet), who went to both Curacao and Aruba and learned papiamentu. The video has portuguese subtitles.
He begins by saying "Ayo tur hende" which actually means goodbye everyone instead of hello everyone.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBDry6UHjuo

User avatar
E}{pugnator
Posts: 2077
Joined: 2002-06-24, 17:27
Real Name: Expug
Gender: male
Location: Vitoria da Conquista (living in Belo Horizonte)
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)

Re: papiamentu language learning

Postby E}{pugnator » 2013-04-11, 23:29

Thanks El Viento! I know Marcelo Adnet and this video. Need to get back to it so that I learn more stuff. He is easy to understand because he has a Brazilian accent, that is, he speaks as I would be speaking myself. Now that I wrote it again, it makes much more sense!

The reason I finally began actively learning Papiamento is because I'm going to Curaçao and Aruba in september! I'm using Papiamento Textbook and so far my comprehension is improving. I think the most difficult thing is getting used to the stress on the verbs (which is on the first syllable while in Portuguese/Spanish it would be on the last one) and the different tone that is used there.

Thanks for the link with the media. I need to listen a lot even though I still can't understand everything. Sometimes there's Dutch in between :lol:
Learning Georgian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Papiamentu from scratch. Trying to brush up my Norwegian up to an advanced level.

User avatar
E}{pugnator
Posts: 2077
Joined: 2002-06-24, 17:27
Real Name: Expug
Gender: male
Location: Vitoria da Conquista (living in Belo Horizonte)
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)

Re: papiamentu language learning

Postby E}{pugnator » 2013-04-15, 18:04

I'm having trouble understanding this joke, mainly the first sentence, because I think "ke" means "want"/"querer":

Hues: "Mi ke mi a mirá bo mas bes"
Culpabel: "Sí, Señor Hues, t'ami a siñá Señor Hues su yiu muhé canta"
Hues: "Anto mi ta condená bo pa dies aña di trabou forsá".

Shouldn't it be "Mi kere"? (I believe/yo creo)
Learning Georgian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Papiamentu from scratch. Trying to brush up my Norwegian up to an advanced level.

User avatar
E}{pugnator
Posts: 2077
Joined: 2002-06-24, 17:27
Real Name: Expug
Gender: male
Location: Vitoria da Conquista (living in Belo Horizonte)
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)

Re: papiamentu language learning

Postby E}{pugnator » 2013-05-08, 19:01

E siman aki mi a kaba lesa i studia e libru Papiamentu Textbook, di E. R. Goilo. Mi a kuminsa wak e programa di televishon DC 21 na Youtube. Mi també ta lesando un revista na papiamentu tur dia, i lo mi ke kuminsa lesa e storianan kortiku ku mi a haña ayera. Mi por komprende ya un tiki di papiamentu, ma ami no por papia pasobra awor mi no tin manera di praktiká.
Learning Georgian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Papiamentu from scratch. Trying to brush up my Norwegian up to an advanced level.


Return to “Creole Languages”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest