Cape Verdean Creole

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Elaine
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Cape Verdean Creole

Postby Elaine » 2015-02-03, 10:13

There was no thread about Cape Verdean Creole, so I decided to open a thread for that language.

You can ask your questions about the language.
Native: (tr)
Advanced: (el) (en) (sv)
Intermediate: (de) (ga) (sq)
Currently learning: (es) (ko)

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TeneReef
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Re: Cape Verdean Creole

Postby TeneReef » 2015-03-08, 17:48

I like it, but everyone in Cape Verde speaks Portuguese.
It may be useful for understanding local music (either zouk or coladera).
Every island has its own creole, and linguistic-wise, there are two distinct groups: Sotavento and Barlavento Creoles, which are as distant as Portuguese and Spanish are. For example, in Praia, a pig is said porku and in Mindelo it's txuk. :para:

conjugation-wise

the basic derivative form is past (which is identical to infinitive): txora (it means either ''to cry'' or ''cried'')

M txora = I cried.

If you want to make the present form, you have to put ta before this basic past/infinitive form,
while doing this you transform it into imperfective present:

M txora (I cried) + ta -> M ta txora (I cry).

M kre-bu (I wanted you) + ta -> M ta kre-bu (I want you).

M ama-bu (I loved you) + ta -> M ta ama-bu (I love you).

That's in Santiago (the largest island) creole.

A song partially sung in the creole (you can hear M ta ama-bu said):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bTzMajLLNQ
विकृतिः एवम्‌ प्रकृति

vijayjohn
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Re: Cape Verdean Creole

Postby vijayjohn » 2015-08-23, 2:39

I think this might be the next creole I try to learn. It's probably interesting for historical reasons since IIRC it's one of the oldest Atlantic creoles there is.


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