Three sentences I need translating to Welsh/Cymraeg please.

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Boheme
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Three sentences I need translating to Welsh/Cymraeg please.

Postby Boheme » 2017-06-05, 9:59

Hi,

I would appreciate if anyone can tell me how you'd translate the following sentences please:

"Banknotes are protected by criminal law."

"Promise to pay the bearer the sum of."

and

"Monetary Authority of Wales."

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linguoboy
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Re: Three sentences I need translating to Welsh/Cymraeg please.

Postby linguoboy » 2017-06-05, 17:51

Make I ask what you need these for? They seem awfully official, but government offices in Wales should have access to paid translators.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Boheme
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Re: Three sentences I need translating to Welsh/Cymraeg please.

Postby Boheme » 2017-06-06, 1:55

linguoboy wrote:Make I ask what you need these for? They seem awfully official, but government offices in Wales should have access to paid translators.


It's for a Graphic design project, where I'm making banknotes. I don't want to really use a google translation for it though.

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linguoboy
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Re: Three sentences I need translating to Welsh/Cymraeg please.

Postby linguoboy » 2017-06-06, 2:32

It would be best if you could get these checked by a fluent speaker, but I'll have a go:

"Banknotes are protected by criminal law."

Diogelir papurau [X] gan gyfraith trosedd.

There's no general word for "banknote" in Welsh. You need to add the name of the currency, e.g. papurau punnoedd "pound notes", papurau doleri "dollar bills". It agrees in number with the head noun (e.g. papur punt "pound note").

"Promise to pay the bearer the sum of."

Addo i dalu y swm o __ i'r dygiedydd.

"Monetary Authority of Wales."

Awdurdod Ariannol Cymru.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Boheme
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Re: Three sentences I need translating to Welsh/Cymraeg please.

Postby Boheme » 2017-06-06, 4:45

linguoboy wrote:It would be best if you could get these checked by a fluent speaker, but I'll have a go:

"Banknotes are protected by criminal law."

Diogelir papurau [X] gan gyfraith trosedd.

There's no general word for "banknote" in Welsh. You need to add the name of the currency, e.g. papurau punnoedd "pound notes", papurau doleri "dollar bills". It agrees in number with the head noun (e.g. papur punt "pound note").

"Promise to pay the bearer the sum of."

Addo i dalu y swm o __ i'r dygiedydd.

"Monetary Authority of Wales."

Awdurdod Ariannol Cymru.


Thank you very much. :) This I feel would be a lot better than google translate for something not extremely important. I was going to do my own attempt but the VSO order made me get really confused. about where the words should go.

Addo is Addawedigaeth then?

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linguoboy
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Re: Three sentences I need translating to Welsh/Cymraeg please.

Postby linguoboy » 2017-06-06, 13:12

Boheme wrote:Addo is Addawedigaeth then?

Addo is the verb-noun. Addawedigaeth is an abstract noun derived from it via a derived adjective (i.e. addawedig "promised").

Two reasons why I used addo instead of addawedigaeth:

1. The original form of the English term "promise to pay" seems to be "I promise to pay". So "promise" in this expression is verbal rather than nominal.
2. When I Googled variants, "addo i dalu" appeared to be the preferred equivalent for "promise to pay". Addawedigaeth i dalu gets no Ghits at all. (Addawedigaeth only gets three Ghits total, making it a very rare term to begin with.)
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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