How to translate the irish word "Breatimeachta" into English?

Peadar
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How to translate the irish word "Breatimeachta" into English?

Postby Peadar » 2016-10-31, 18:44

I'm trying to read some irish news lately, some international articles keep using the word "Breatimeachta" which I can't find in every irish dictionary nor irish Wikipedia(Nor in Wikitionary FYI)

Here's the article:
http://www.rte.ie/news/nuacht/2016/1004 ... timeachta/

I know it must be referring something about the Commonwealth or the Britain, but I am not quite sure.
I'd also like to know the etymology of this word.
Also, what does "drochimpleachtaí" mean?

Thanks for your help

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linguoboy
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Re: How to translate the irish word "Breatimeachta" into English?

Postby linguoboy » 2016-10-31, 20:05

Peadar wrote:I'm trying to read some irish news lately, some international articles keep using the word "Breatimeachta" which I can't find in every irish dictionary nor irish Wikipedia(Nor in Wikitionary FYI)

Here's the article:
http://www.rte.ie/news/nuacht/2016/1004 ... timeachta/

I know it must be referring something about the Commonwealth or the Britain, but I am not quite sure.

"Brexit" (Breatain "Britain" + imeacht v.n. of imigh "leave, depart")

The form with final -a is actually a genitive.

ETA: Found it in Glosbe: https://glosbe.com/ga/en/Breatimeacht.

Peadar wrote:Also, what does "drochimpleachtaí" mean?

Droch- is a prefix meaning "evil" or "bad", e.g. drochamharc "bad sight", drochshampla "bad example". Impleacht is an implication, so "bad implications".

As an aside, you might notice that both of these words violate the rule of caol le caol agus leathan le leathan, i.e. Breatimeacht, drochimpleacht. That almost always indicates that you're dealing with a compound word (or a poor speller).
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Peadar
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Re: How to translate the irish word "Breatimeachta" into English?

Postby Peadar » 2016-11-01, 15:06

Thank you very much

You seem well-knowing irish, here's another question if you don't mind:

There's a sentence in the song "Mo ghile mear"
It goes "Sé mo laoch mo ghile mear, sé mo Shaesar, ghile mear"
SUC, there isn't a "mo" before "ghile mear", but there's still lenition.

Does this mean that the lenition of the possessed noun is not just a phonetic inflection, but a grammatical one?

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linguoboy
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Re: How to translate the irish word "Breatimeachta" into English?

Postby linguoboy » 2016-11-01, 16:13

Peadar wrote:You seem well-knowingknowledgeable about Irish. Here's another question if you don't mind:

There's a sentence in the song "Mo ghile mear"
It goes "Sé mo laoch mo ghile mear, sé mo Shaesar, ghile mear"
SUC, there isn't a "mo" before "ghile mear", but there's still lenition.

Does this mean that the lenition of the possessed noun is not just a phonetic inflection, but a grammatical one?

Lenition is characteristic of the vocative. The vocative particle a lenits, but is often dropped in speech. Cf. the title of another ballad, "Mháirín Óg Ní Cheallaigh". Máirín is lenited here because it represents direct address. (The title is alternatively given as "A Mháirín Óg Ní Cheallaigh", with a leading vocative particle that is not pronounced.)

That said, can I ask where you found this version? The versions I'm familiar with all have "'Sé mo Shéasar, gile mear", without lenition.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

Peadar
Posts: 13
Joined: 2016-08-26, 11:02
Real Name: 普彥嘉
Gender: male

Re: How to translate the irish word "Breatimeachta" into English?

Postby Peadar » 2016-11-09, 9:54

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxjvNUNXhkU
This one

The lyrics got something unfamiliar that differs from what I've learned
I don't know if it's spoken language or something


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