Basic Celtic Conlang for Alternate Timeline Novel

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Mr. Anomalous
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Joined: 2015-07-14, 1:28
Real Name: Dalton C. Perry
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Basic Celtic Conlang for Alternate Timeline Novel

Postby Mr. Anomalous » 2015-07-14, 1:36

I, the incredible literary genius that I clearly am, have decided to take a shot at writing an alternate timeline novel in which, due to events in Cæsar's Gallic campaign, Celtic culture is much more widespread and prominent. Of course, this would change the way Celtic languages would develope in about a million different ways, so I have attempted to create a conlang. Problem is, I am not a linguist of any sort and nor do I actually speak any Celtic languages. Here is an exmaple of what I have whipped up: "DÛNATH—Cingenfel; ol sifiliaid gwerthan yn ôl." Approximate translation would be: "DANGER—Warzone; civilians keep your distance", or "civilians vacate the premises."

So my only request is this: does this strike you as legitimate? It is supposed to be something of a modern form of Gaulish, without the Latin influence and such.

Thanks in advance! . . ?

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linguoboy
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Re: Basic Celtic Conlang for Alternate Timeline Novel

Postby linguoboy » 2015-07-16, 21:33

Mr. Anomalous wrote:I, the incredible literary genius that I clearly am, have decided to take a shot at writing an alternate timeline novel in which, due to events in Cæsar's Gallic campaign, Celtic culture is much more widespread and prominent. Of course, this would change the way Celtic languages would develope in about a million different ways, so I have attempted to create a conlang. Problem is, I am not a linguist of any sort and nor do I actually speak any Celtic languages. Here is an exmaple of what I have whipped up: "DÛNATH—Cingenfel; ol sifiliaid gwerthan yn ôl." Approximate translation would be: "DANGER—Warzone; civilians keep your distance", or "civilians vacate the premises."

So my only request is this: does this strike you as legitimate? It is supposed to be something of a modern form of Gaulish, without the Latin influence and such.

That just looks to me like munged Welsh.

If you want to see an excellent example of what Gaulish might have developed into had it not been snuffed out by Latin, take a look at Deiniol Jone's Arvorec. (Deiniol is a linguist, as well as a fluent nativbe speaker of Welsh.) Who knows, you might even be able to get his permission to use it in your novel.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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