Multi - Gaeilge

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linguoboy
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Re: Multi - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2020-05-06, 14:49

kevin wrote:
Multiturquoise wrote:Before I left the house I put on my clothes.
Sular fhág mé an teach, chaith mé mo chuid éadaí.

Wouldn't "chaith" mean "I wore my clothes"? I expected "chuir mé mo chuid éadaí orm".

Good catch!

I feel like no matter how many times I read these over, I always miss something glaring. (It doesn't help that the variety Multi is learning is nothing like the one I know, so I end up wasting a lot of time double-checking usages that are perfectly valid but sound odd to me.)

kevin wrote:
She told us to do the homework before tomorrow morning.
D'inis sí an obair bhaile a dhéanamh dúinn roimh mhaidin amárach.

Here, I would have preferred "dúirt sí linn" rather than "inis", though I'm not sure if "inis" is strictly wrong.

I think of inis as meaning "tell" mainly in the sense of "relate" (e.g. Inis dom scéal! "Tell me a story!"), but it can also mean "inform", e.g. D'inseas dó faoin taisme. "I told him about the accident". So I think it works here.

kevin wrote:
linguoboy wrote:Traditional Irish doesn't allow you to freely front sentence elements without altering the syntax of the sentence. Most frequently what you have is a cleft sentence formed with the help of the copula, i.e.: [...]

Wouldn't you only do that to emphasise the timing, though? ("It was before the breakfast that I took a shower") So wouldn't it be the better solution to just put "roimh bhricfeasta" last in the sentence?

Pretty much. (I tend to focus primarily on spelling and syntax in my corrections, figuring once you've got those down, then we can talk more about semantics and pragmatics. But it's worth keeping in mind that topicalisation works significantly different in Irish and (non-Hiberno-)English.

silmeth wrote:
linguoboy wrote:Roimh bhricfeasta a thógaim cith.

You forgot to remove the pronoun after the synthetic verb here.

Tiubaist!
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Multi - Gaeilge

Postby kevin » 2020-05-06, 15:05

linguoboy wrote:
kevin wrote:
She told us to do the homework before tomorrow morning.
D'inis sí an obair bhaile a dhéanamh dúinn roimh mhaidin amárach.

Here, I would have preferred "dúirt sí linn" rather than "inis", though I'm not sure if "inis" is strictly wrong.

I think of inis as meaning "tell" mainly in the sense of "relate" (e.g. Inis dom scéal! "Tell me a story!"), but it can also mean "inform", e.g. D'inseas dó faoin taisme. "I told him about the accident". So I think it works here.

Yes, I see that "inis" works for both of these cases. But the sentence in question doesn't just inform, but actually instruct/order to do something, and that's where I'm not sure if "inis" works. The usual suspect dictionaries don't seem to mention this meaning for "inis", but only for "abair".

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Re: Multi - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2020-05-06, 18:48

kevin wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Here, I would have preferred "dúirt sí linn" rather than "inis", though I'm not sure if "inis" is strictly wrong.

I think of inis as meaning "tell" mainly in the sense of "relate" (e.g. Inis dom scéal! "Tell me a story!"), but it can also mean "inform", e.g. D'inseas dó faoin taisme. "I told him about the accident". So I think it works here.

Yes, I see that "inis" works for both of these cases. But the sentence in question doesn't just inform, but actually instruct/order to do something, and that's where I'm not sure if "inis" works. The usual suspect dictionaries don't seem to mention this meaning for "inis", but only for "abair".

Géillim duit ar an bpointe. Abair is definitely preferable here.

Still, maith an duine, a Mhuilti! Very good work overall.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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