Elaine - Gaeilge

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linguoboy
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Re: Aisling - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2015-06-09, 22:20

Aisling wrote:I'm returned back again! D'fhill mé ar ais arís!

An bhfaca tú ar an físeán seo riamh? - Have you ever seen this video?
Nílim ag déanamh staidéir ar an fhisic anois, ach déanfaidh mé staidéar ar an ábhar sin ina dhiaidh sinníos déanaí. - I am not studying physics now, but I will study that subject later.
Tabharfaidh an freastalaí an biachlár dúinn. - The waiter will bringgive us the menu.
Is mairg nach bhfuil Gaeilge líofa agam. - I wish I spoke Irish fluently.

More like "It's too bad/a shame/a pity I don't speak Irish fluently".
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Aisling - Gaeilge

Postby Elaine » 2015-07-18, 20:57

I'm back again!

I tried to translate "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." to Irish:
Ní féidir le haon duine tú a chur ag mothú íochtarach gan do chead.

Could you correct my mistakes, please? I'd be very pleased if you corrected it.
GRMMA :)
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Re: Aisling - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2015-07-21, 14:11

Aisling wrote:I tried to translate "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." to Irish:
Ní féidir le haon duine tú a chur ag mothú íochtarach gan do chead.

Could you correct my mistakes, please? I'd be very pleased if you corrected it.
GRMMA :)

I don't recall seeing mothaigh used with predicate adjectives, only nouns (including verb-nouns), e.g. Mhothaigh sé pian géar ina dhroim. For adjectives, the usual choice is airigh.

But the whole construction strikes me as completely unidiomatic for Irish anyway. I would've gone with something like Ní féidir le haon duine náiríocht a chur ort gan do chead.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Elaine - Gaeilge

Postby Elaine » 2016-02-13, 11:45

An bhféadfá an t-aistriúchán seo atá déanta agam a sheiceáil?
Shuigh Banríon an Cháca ar a ríchathaoir le borróg bhándearg atá blas sú talún uirthi agus reoánta go hálainn ina lámh.

Ba mhian liom a rá:
The Queen of Cake sat on her throne with a beautifully iced pink, strawberry flavoured cupcake in her hand.

Go raibh mile maith agaibh :)
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Re: Elaine - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2016-02-13, 17:01

Elaine wrote:An bhféadfá an t-aistriúchán seo atá déanta agam a sheiceáil?
Shuigh Banríon an Cháca ar a ríchathaoir le borróg bhándearg atáfaoi bhlas sútha talún uirthi agus reoánta go hálainn ina lámh.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Elaine - Gaeilge

Postby Elaine » 2016-07-26, 22:02

Hey!

I tried to translate a sentence: Biz bitti demeden bitmez (It doesn't end until we say it ended)

Ní chríochnaítear sula ndéarfaimid gur chríochnaíodh.

Go raibh míle maith agaibh arís.
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Re: Elaine - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2016-07-27, 1:49

Elaine wrote:I tried to translate a sentence: Biz bitti demeden bitmez (It doesn't end until we say it ended)

Ní chríochnaítear sula ndéarfaimid gur chríochnaíodh.

I'm not sure why you're using the impersonal here. It suggests that something was finished, but you don't know by whom, making the lack of an object odd and unidiomatic.

I'm also not sure if this is a proverbial saying in Turkish or not. If it is (roughly the equivalent of "It ain't over til it's over" or "It's not over until the fat lady sings" in English), then I would translate it with an equivalent seanfhocal in Irish. Otherwise I would suggest something along the lines of the following:

Níl deireadh leis nó go ndeirimid go raibh deireadh leis.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Elaine - Gaeilge

Postby Elaine » 2016-11-23, 18:31

Dia daoibh arís!

Ba mhaith liom an difríocht idir "chun" agus "go" a fhoghlaim. An bhféadfá insint an difríocht dom? Go raibh maith agaibh!

I would like to learn the difference between "chun" and "go". Could you tell me the difference? Thank you very much!

For example:

"is mian liom dul chun na hÉireann" and "is mian liom dul go hÉirinn.".
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Re: Elaine - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2016-11-23, 19:52

Elaine wrote:Ba mhaith liom an difríocht idir "chun" agus "go" a fhoghlaim. An bhféadfá insint an difríocht a insint dom? Go raibh maith agaibh!


For example:

"is mian liom dul chun na hÉireann" and "is mian liom dul go hÉirinn.".

I can't think of when I would ever say the first sentence.

Both prepositions have several uses. For motion towards, I prefer go (dtí). Most attestations I can find for chun na hÉireann have the meaning of "for", e.g. cabhair chun na hÉireann ón Spáinn "assistance for Ireland from Spain", Ambasadóir chun na hÉireann "Ambassador to Ireland" (cf. Do tháinig an ambasadóir go hÉirinn "The ambassador came to Ireland").

I suppose some speakers might distinguish between chun an tí "towards the house" and go dtí an teach "(in)to the house", but the first of these is more unambiguously expressed as i dtreo an tí.
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Re: Elaine - Gaeilge

Postby Elaine » 2017-08-02, 22:48

Hello again!

How can I say "I went to thirty-seven districts of Istanbul"

My try is "Chuaigh mé go seacht gceantar is tríocha Iostanbúil.", but not sure about its accuracy at all.

GRMMA!
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Re: Elaine - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2017-08-03, 16:11

Elaine wrote:How can I say "I went to thirty-seven districts of Istanbul"

My try is "Chuaigh mé go seacht gceantar is tríocha Iostanbúil.", but not sure about its accuracy at all.

tríocha = 30 (or fiche a deich "20 [and] 10" if you're a traditionalist like me)

Iostanbúl is a fourth declension masculine noun, so the genitive is the same.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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