Conversational filler words and particles in Celtic language

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Doimnic
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Conversational filler words and particles in Celtic language

Postby Doimnic » 2013-04-12, 0:15

Filler words are especially useful when speaking a new language, because even more often than in your native language you will pause looking for a word or constructing the next phrase. They don't seem so abrupt when you use some filler words. Ideally not "erm" and "um" all the time. Additionally, you sound much more like a native speaker with little extra effort.

[flag]cy[/flag] I found these fillers for Welsh on a website:
http://clwbmalucachu.co.uk/cmc/cheat/cheat_useful_filler.htm

I have spent some time in North Wales doing an elective, I especially heard "'te" and "iawn, 'te" all the time :)

useful phrases - filler

dyna ni/‘na ni there we are, that’s it
dyna ti/‘na ti there you are
‘te/de then
iawn ‘te ok then
a dweud y gwir to tell the truth
mewn gwirionedd in fact, in truth
gyda llaw by the way
beth bynnag whatever, anyway
i’r dim! perfect!
‘tydy? / on'd ydy (e)? (SW) isn’t it?
nerth dy ben with all your might
yr union beth just the thing
rhoi wybod i mi let me know
dros ben exceedingly, very much so
o’n i’n meddwl hynny I thought so
tybed I wonder
beth sy'n bod? What's the matter?

phrases which mean ‘y’know’

sti
timod
chimod

phrases which mean ‘honestly’

yn onest
wir i ti
wir i chi
wir yr
yn wir

hynny phrases

ar hyn o bryd at the moment
hyd yn hyn/hyd yma so far, till now, still, yet
hyd hynny up to that time
hyn oll all this
fel hyn like this, in this way
fel hynny/fel ‘ny like that, in that way
bryd hynny/bryd ‘ny at that time
wedi ‘ny after that, then
erbyn hyn before this, by now, so far
serch hynny however, nonetheless, despite that
hyn o dro on this occasion

vague time phrases

bob tro/bob amser every time, each time
y tro cyntaf the first time
y tro yma this time
trwy’r amser all the time
yn ystod during
fel arfer usually
o dro i dro occasionally
yn aml often
Last edited by Doimnic on 2013-04-25, 15:12, edited 1 time in total.
an té naċ ḃfuil láidir, ní foláir dó ḃeiṫ ag riṫ go tapaiḋ

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Re: Conversational filler words and particles in Celtic language

Postby Doimnic » 2013-04-12, 1:52

[flag]ga[/flag] Anois, rinne mé iarracht Gaeilge na hÉireann a chur ar an méid seo, bhéinn buíoch as gach cuidiú! I tried to look for Irish equivalents, would be grateful for any help!


useful phrases - filler

muis(e) indeed
abair say
era well, indeed
ach sin é an saol/ cad is féidir a rá? there we are, that’s it
sin agat (anois) é/ sin mar atá there you are
seo linn!/ seo arís muid! here we go (again)!
mar sin then
ceart go leor mar sin ok then
iontach/ thar barr/ ar fheabhas/ thar cionn great
leis an fhírinne a rá to tell the truth
déanta na fírinne in fact, in truth
dála an scéil/ bíodh a fhios agat by the way
ar aon nós/ ar scor ar bith/pé scéal é whatever, anyway
iontach!/ ar fheabhas! perfect!
nach ea?/ nach bhfuil? isn’t it?
ar theann do dhíchill with all your might
sin/seo go díreach an rud just the thing
abair liom/inis dom/ cur ar an eolas mé let me know
go deimhin/ leoga exceedingly, very much so
sin a cheap mé/ sin é a shíl mé/ leis sin a bhí mé ag súil I thought so
ní fheadar I wonder
cad é atá cearr?, cad é atá (ag teacht) ort? What's the matter?
nach cuma?/ nach cuma faoi/fá dtaobh do? What does it matter?
(seo) ar fad/ uile/ go léir all this
mar seo like this, in this way
mar sin like that, in that way
mar sin féin/ é sin ráite/ áfach/ ámh/ bíodh sin mar atá however, nonetheless, despite that


phrases which mean ‘y’know’

an bhfuil a fhios agat
tá a fhios agat (féin)
mar a déarfá

phrases which mean ‘honestly’

chun bheith macánta leat
le fírinne
leis an fhírinne a rá/ a insint duit
dáiríre
déanta na fírinne

vague time phrases

faoi láthair/ i láthair na huaire/ san am i láthair at the moment
i láthair na huaire/ go ceann scaithimh/ ar feadh tamaill/ faoi láthair for the time being
go dtí seo/ go nuige seo so far, till now
go dtí seo/ fós/ arís still, yet
faoin am ar tharla rud/ faoin am a tharla sé by that time
tar éis an méid sin uile/ ina dhiaidh sin agus uile/ ar deireadh thiar thall/ i ndeireadh na dála after all
roimhe sin/ cheana before this, so far
an iarraidh se/ an turas seo/ den dul seo on this occasion

gach uair/ gach aon uair/ gach babhta/ gach uile uair every time, each time
don chead uair for the first time
an uair seo this time
i gcónaí/ i rith an ama/ an t-am ar fad/ an t-am go léir all the time
le linn/ i rith/ i gcaitheamh/ ar feadh during
de ghnáth/ go hiondúil usually
mar i gcónaí like always
anois is arís/ ó am go ham occasionally
minic/ iomaí often
an té naċ ḃfuil láidir, ní foláir dó ḃeiṫ ag riṫ go tapaiḋ

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Re: Conversational filler words and particles in Celtic language

Postby Doimnic » 2013-04-12, 2:03

Hm, the title of this thread is missing an "-s" at the end, sorry! It's really annoying me, but I don't seem to be able to change that for some reason...
Maybe the name's too long...
an té naċ ḃfuil láidir, ní foláir dó ḃeiṫ ag riṫ go tapaiḋ

Llawygath
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Re: Conversational filler words and particles in Celtic language

Postby Llawygath » 2013-04-25, 11:39

Thanks for this thread - or should I say 'diolch yn fawr am yr edau 'ma'? However, if you'll forgive me I must pick a nit.
Doimnic wrote:‘tydy
This is a northern form (I've heard it's yn dydy/yn tydy up there, actually, so your source must have been leaving out yn). The southern and the form I usually find in teaching materials is on'dydy?.

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Re: Conversational filler words and particles in Celtic language

Postby Doimnic » 2013-04-25, 15:08

Llawygath wrote:Thanks for this thread - or should I say 'diolch yn fawr am yr edau 'ma'?
Croeso i chdi!

Llawygath wrote:This is a northern form (I've heard it's yn dydy/yn tydy up there, actually, so your source must have been leaving out yn). The southern and the form I usually find in teaching materials is on'dydy?.

Oh yes, that would be a northern form, I should have (or they should have) given the southern form as well. Thank you, I'll change it!

Welsh question tags are quite extensive field, there are different forms and developments in Northern and Southern Welsh, some of them tend to use a positive-negative/negative-positive pattern (sentence positive-tag negative/sentence negative-tag positive, mostly in the South) and some a positive-positive or negative-negative pattern (more often in North Wales). Southern forms often have subject pronouns, northern forms do not.
It can be quite confusing (at least to me), here is a comprehensive overview you might already know: http://benjamins.com/jbp/series/DIA/25-1/art/03rot.pdf

It would appear that these are the most common:

Southern:
- positive sentence, on'd yw e (or, as you write, on'd ydy e)?/on'd oes e?/on'd allen ni? etc.
- negative sentence, yw e?/oes e?/allen ni? etc.

Northern:
- positive sentence, (yn) t-ydy?/(yn) t-oes?/(yn) gallen ni? etc.
- negative sentence, (yn) nag ydy?/ (yn) nag oes?/ (yn) na allen? etc.
an té naċ ḃfuil láidir, ní foláir dó ḃeiṫ ag riṫ go tapaiḋ

Llawygath
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Re: Conversational filler words and particles in Celtic language

Postby Llawygath » 2013-05-15, 12:44

Yes I've read that overview. It's quite interesting. You are right that there is also on'd yw (e).

Another nit: I learned wedyn, not wedi 'ny. Is this another N/S thing maybe?


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