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Celtic language translation

Posted: 2006-04-22, 11:05
by Vlacko
Hi,

I know that this is some Celtic language, don't know which...

Phrase goes like this:

Is fuair an chroi

I would also need transcription of this phrase.

Thanks!

Posted: 2006-04-22, 12:17
by DelBoy
Hi!

It's Irish.
It means: 'The heart is cold' and should be:
Is fuair é an croí
/s 'fu: ər e: n kri:/

:wink:

Posted: 2006-04-22, 18:35
by Vlacko
Thanks DelBoy! :wink:

Posted: 2006-04-28, 1:18
by mhwombat
DelBoy wrote:Is fuar é an croí


Cén fáth "fuair" in áit le "fuar"? Níl an Tuiseal Ginideach i gceist. Canúint?

Posted: 2006-04-28, 1:55
by Drochfhuaimniú
Couldn't it be "The heart is coldest", because of its use of Is fuair?

Posted: 2006-04-28, 2:19
by mhwombat
Drochfhuaimniú wrote:Couldn't it be "The heart is coldest", because of its use of Is fuair?

Maybe... but then wouldn't it need to be "fuaire"?

I suppose it could also be the beginning of a sentence "And the heart got..."

Posted: 2006-04-29, 21:52
by DelBoy
mhwombat wrote:
DelBoy wrote:Is fuar é an croí


Cén fáth "fuair" in áit le "fuar"? Níl an Tuiseal Ginideach i gceist. Canúint?


Oops! :oops: Sin botún! Tá an ceart agat:
'Is fuar é an croí'

:lol:

translation (aistriúchán)

Posted: 2006-05-26, 16:39
by Robert S
Dia duit (Hello),

I'm currently attempting to learning some Irish Gaelic (Gaeilge) on my own, and was wondering if someone could help me with a translation of a quote.
I just started and this is above my level at this point.

Just curious as to how this would be written:

"When one tugs at a single thing in
nature, he finds it attached to
the rest of the world."

:idea: How about this?
"Nuair a tharraingítear ar rud amháin i nádúr, tugtar faoi deara go bhfuil sé ceangailte leis an gcuid eile don domhain."

OR

"Nuair a bhaintear tarraignt as rud amháin sa nádúr, faightear amach go bhfuil sé ceangailte don chuile eile den domhan."

Go raibh míle maith agat (Thank you very much),

Robert :D

Tattoo translation please!

Posted: 2006-05-30, 3:24
by totamealion
Looking for the translation for "Blood is thicker than water" in Gaelic please, for a tattoo.

Posted: 2006-05-31, 0:41
by Egein
Is tibhe an fhuil nó an uisce

But I'm not a native speaker.
There might be an expression for what you mean of which I'm not aware.

Posted: 2006-05-31, 2:29
by Drochfhuaimniú
For a tattoo ... I'd recommend that you go here and get a bunch of opinions.

http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/

Posted: 2006-06-01, 12:41
by DelBoy
If you are looking for a literal translation, it would be:

Is tibhe an fhuil ná an t-uisce

but for a more natural Irish expression, a seanfhocal, the best I could find is:

Is fearr beagán den ghaol ná mórán den charthanas

A small amount of relation is better than a lot of charity


But as it's for a tattoo, definitley try to get some more suggetions from the site mentioned above!

Posted: 2006-06-01, 16:50
by DelBoy
Hi,

this is a little tough.... I'm just trying to find the right word for 'tug on'

'tarraing ar' doesnt actually have this meaning, but rather 'come across'.

I would probably go for;

Nuair a tharraingíonn duine rud amháin sa nádúr, faigheann go bhfuil sé ceangailte leis an gcuid eile den domhain

translation!!!

Posted: 2006-07-04, 14:59
by nicren
hey there. em i need Andrew translated for a tatoo. I can put it into the leeters but there isnt a leeter for W as far as i can see. could u please help!!! even email me at nuttynic2001@hotmail.com

if a few people could reply that would be great!!!

Thank you xx

Posted: 2006-07-04, 17:02
by DelBoy
Andrew - Aindriú

Irish flute - names of its elements in Irish Gaelic...

Posted: 2006-08-21, 20:56
by flipp
Hi everybody.
I own a wooden keyless Irish flute (transvers). I know the names of the different parts of it in English: head-body-foot. I really want to know these names in Irish Gaelic.
Many thanks for your answer.

Re: Irish flute - names of its elements in Irish Gaelic...

Posted: 2006-08-21, 21:07
by Drochfhuaimniú
flipp wrote:Hi everybody.
I own a wooden keyless Irish flute (transvers). I know the names of the different parts of it in English: head-body-foot. I really want to know these names in Irish Gaelic.
Many thanks for your answer.


head: ceann
body: corp
foot: cos

Cos also means leg in Irish.

I am not very familiar with musical terms regarding flutes, so these may be known in Irish as something less literal. But I've tried with literal translations.

Posted: 2006-08-21, 21:25
by flipp
Hi Drochfhuaimniú.
Thanks for your message. It's very clear.
I wasn't shure about the meaning of the word 'cos' I saw already in some gaelic text but written like this (still in Irish flute context): 'cois' or 'chois' (what's different and is that correct too?).
I must say I know really nothing in Gaelic ;-)

Posted: 2006-08-21, 21:37
by DelBoy
'cois' and 'chois' are different mutated forms of the genitive form of 'cos'

I'm afraid I can't add to what Drochfhuaimniú has said - I can't find a dictionary for musical instruments, and these are not exactly words in common usage, outside the flute playing world...
I would say the translations Drochfhuaimniú gave would be understood anyway.

I can tell you that a traverse flute in Irish would be:
Fliúit (or 'an fhliúit', for 'the flute')
:wink:

Posted: 2006-08-21, 21:41
by DelBoy
Oh, I just had a brainwave! You said you saw 'cois' and 'chois' in some Irish texts. Were these texts about the flute? Would it have been something like
'alt choise' or 'alt na coise'?