[Irish] Translation requests

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nighean-neonach
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Re: Short Translation Request

Postby nighean-neonach » 2009-03-07, 22:57

Eoghan wrote:And I know the word dùisg also translates as "awake", but would it be okay to use mosgail instead?


To be honest, I've never heard "mosgail", I've just seen it in old poetry.
Writing poetry in: Scottish Gaelic, German, English.
Reading poetry in: Latin, Old Irish, French, Ancient Greek, Old Norse.
Talking to people in the shop in: Lithuanian, Norwegian, Irish Gaelic, Saami.
Listening to people talking in the shop in: Icelandic, Greenlandic, Finnish.

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Eoghan
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Re: Short Translation Request

Postby Eoghan » 2009-03-07, 23:31

nighean-neonach wrote:
Eoghan wrote:And I know the word dùisg also translates as "awake", but would it be okay to use mosgail instead?


To be honest, I've never heard "mosgail", I've just seen it in old poetry.


I've heard both mosgail and dùisg, and I think mosgail sounds more poetic, and I'm a poetic kind of person, so... :)
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Albeit the Scot in me is of the Western stock and the red of the Cairngorms, the heather and the Lewissian gneiss, the Viking in me was there when you uttered the first word of your leid.

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Please translate!

Postby Rosbos » 2009-04-21, 9:31

I've got sentences, and I'm curious how they can get translated to Irish Gaelic!
Could someone help me, with perhaps only some of, these sentences? It's for a project for the University.
Thank you in advance!

1. The king found some books.
2. He did not read any books to his son.
3. The three soldiers stirred the soup.
4. They will stir it for three hours.
5. Every soldier was old and ugly.
6. The castle is on a hill near a lake.
7. Antonio has lived in Venice for three years now.
8. No one arrived at the castle yesterday.
9. Most of Prospero's books will arrive next week.
10. The kind man gave a book to his daughter.
11. She will put the book on a chair.
12. Macbeth may find them in the forest (assume that them refers to people).
13. Falstaff drank a glass of beer.
14. Falstaff drank because he was thirsty.
15. Miranda knew that Prospero had many books.
16. Hamlet said that his mother was disloyal.
17. Portia told Shylock that he should be kind to Antonio.
18. Macbeth tried to kill the king.
19. Macbeth tried to meet a witch.
20. Prospero has promised to give her all the books.

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Re: help with translation: gaelic

Postby SyracuseOrange » 2009-05-14, 18:29

Hi,

I am wondering if someone can help me out with an Irish Gaelic transaltion of the noun 'endurance,' in the context of - "I'm an endurance runner." I'm quite sure the verb is 'mair' but could not find the translation for endurance. Thank you so much for your help!!

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Re: help with translation: gaelic

Postby DelBoy » 2009-05-14, 21:21

I'm not sure, but 'endurance training' is 'traenáil bhuaine' so I guess endurance runner is 'reathaí buaine'.

So in this case, endurance is 'buaine' - permanance/constancy/everlastingness/perseverence.
The British Isles are awesome - I know, I live there - but Ireland is not a part of them. K thnx bai!

Labharfainn níos mó faoi, dá dtuigfinn an bhrí...

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Re: help with translation: gaelic

Postby SyracuseOrange » 2009-05-14, 23:43

Great thank you!!!

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New learner looking for help with translation =)

Postby Ava-Adore » 2009-06-25, 3:48

I am trying to learn Irish...but where I live there are very little resources.
I am just starting out so be patient please =)

I am trying to translate "I am free" (but not "free" as in, "without cost")
So far this is what I have : "Eu son libre"
I think this is very wrong...Also, I am not sure if there is a masculine/feminine version. I am a girl, so...I don't know how that works.
I want to translate this for a painting...not a tattoo!

I would really appreciate the help.

thank you,

Amber

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Re: New learner looking for help with translation =)

Postby Tiorthan » 2009-06-25, 9:35

Are you sure you're learning Irish?

"Eu son libre" is very far away from anything Irish as Irish does not have any of these words.

One of those maybe.
tá mé saor - I am free.
tá saoirse agam - I have freedom.

Anyways, I'm a beginner
Corrections welcome in the following languages:
English, Irish

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Re: New learner looking for help with translation =)

Postby jodiepooler » 2009-06-25, 13:12

I am just learning too but that don't look right to me.Free is saor.So maybe Tá mé saor. Or Tá mé saor agam.I am not sure. Hope this helps a little.

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Tiorthan
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Re: New learner looking for help with translation =)

Postby Tiorthan » 2009-06-25, 16:59

jodiepooler wrote:Tá mé saor agam.

That would put two "me" into the sentence as there's one in agam as well.
Corrections welcome in the following languages:
English, Irish

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Re: New learner looking for help with translation =)

Postby DelBoy » 2009-06-25, 19:48

Ava-Adore wrote:So far this is what I have : "Eu son libre"


Em.... portuguese?

'Tá mé saor' is what you're after :wink:
The British Isles are awesome - I know, I live there - but Ireland is not a part of them. K thnx bai!

Labharfainn níos mó faoi, dá dtuigfinn an bhrí...

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Re: New learner looking for help with translation =)

Postby LoneWolf » 2009-06-25, 22:19

Ava-Adore wrote:I am trying to learn Irish...but where I live there are very little resources.
I am just starting out so be patient please =)

I am trying to translate "I am free" (but not "free" as in, "without cost")
So far this is what I have : "Eu son libre"

Amber


Sounds more to me like your trying to translate a sentence in French here :? ? In French "I am free" would be "je suis libre". Your translation caught my attention because it looked somewhat like what they would say in Québécois "Eux-(autres) y sont libres" for "they are free".

But anyway somewhat off topic here...

As for a Gaeilge (Irish) translation, I can't suggest anything better than what has already been said by others earlier. Maybe you will find something useful here : http://www.daltai.com/sf_eile.htm

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translation help

Postby jodiepooler » 2009-06-26, 18:56

How do you write "I would like to do something." "What would you like?" I know how these sound in Munster but the book I am using is standard. I am not sure it is the same words they sound so different. I ordered a new book "Learning Irish" by Michael Ó Siadhail to help me get a better feel for speaking the language.
Go raibh maith agat.

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Re: translation help

Postby Tiorthan » 2009-06-26, 20:39

I'd say the following:
I'd like to do something - Ba mhaith liom rud inteacht a dhéanamh.
What would you like? - Cad é a ba mhaith leat?

That's Ulster dialect though, what they'd be in the standard I'm much more unsure could be:
Ba mhaith liom rud éigin a dhéanamh.
Cad ba mhaith leat?
Corrections welcome in the following languages:
English, Irish

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Re: translation help

Postby Quevenois » 2009-06-26, 23:42

Ok.
Last edited by Quevenois on 2010-11-15, 2:29, edited 1 time in total.
אַ שפראַך איז אַ דיאַלעקט מיט אַן אַרמײ און פֿלאָט

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Re: translation help

Postby jodiepooler » 2009-06-27, 15:44

Go raibh maith agat. Now I know what I started speaking is what I am learning in the book they just pronounce it differently. :D

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Re: translation help

Postby Supreemio » 2009-06-28, 21:58

In Conamara Irish:

Céard ba mhaith leat = what woud you like?
Ba mhaith liom rud eícint a dhéanamh = I would like to do something

''a dhéanamh'' is prononced if it was written ''a dhíonamh''.

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Re: 3 Word Translation

Postby Quevenois » 2009-12-02, 22:32

It would be "Grá, ní bréaga", or "Grá, chan bréaga".
But it may depend on the context too...
אַ שפראַך איז אַ דיאַלעקט מיט אַן אַרמײ און פֿלאָט

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Re: 3 Word Translation

Postby Íde » 2009-12-07, 18:43

That's the problem with translations... there is NEVER only one way to do things!

The above translations are 100% correct, although I must admit, my first instinct was to go for 'grá seachas bréaga' which translates as 'love as opposed to lies' (rather than simply 'love not lies'). It all depends really on your own personal preference and what exactly you are trying to convey.

Interestingly, the verb 'bréag', which comes from exactly the same root as the noun, 'bréag' [lie] means 'to seduce'(!!!) as in the folk-song 'Buachaill ón Éirne' - 'bhréagfainn féin cailín deas óg'. Who says the Irish are not cynical! :wink:
Tá mé mar atá mé, agus ní fhuil mé gan locht. An té atá saor, caitheadh sé cloch.

(Only kidding... please feel free to correct me anytime!)

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Translation

Postby Paulking » 2010-01-03, 2:09

Could anyone help me translate the sentence "Peter washes himself" into Irish? The sentence shall have a reflexive. For example, the equivalent sentence in French should be " Pierre se lave". I'm writing an essay about reflexives, so I need your help~ Thanks in advance~


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