Leipreachán

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gfl87
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Real Name: Giacomo
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Leipreachán

Postby gfl87 » 2012-01-15, 0:22

Hi guys,
just one question:
what would be the phonetic transcription (IPA) of a good Gaelic pronunciation of the word «leipreachán»?
Thank you very much.
Giacomo /ˈʤa.ko.mo/ [ˈʤaːkomo]

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linguoboy
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Re: Leipreachán

Postby linguoboy » 2012-01-15, 7:21

[ˌlʲɛpʲɾʲəˈxɑːn̪ˠ]

That's Munster. For Connacht, reverse the stress assignment (i.e. primary on the first syllable, secondary on the last); the vowels may be different as well. I can't help you with Ulster.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

gfl87
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Location: Venice
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Leipreachán

Postby gfl87 » 2012-01-15, 11:27

Great, thank you very much, linguoboy!
It's all the information I need: easy now to go back to the phonemic structure and the reverse to the local realizationn one needs. What's the source you looked up: I spent some hours seaching on the Internet...
g

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linguoboy
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Re: Leipreachán

Postby linguoboy » 2012-01-15, 15:04

gfl87 wrote:Great, thank you very much, linguoboy!
It's all the information I need: easy now to go back to the phonemic structure and the reverse to the local realizationn one needs. What's the source you looked up: I spent some hours seaching on the Internet...

My primary reference for Munster pronunciation is Ó Cuív's The Irish of West Muskerry, Co. Cork. The best online source for that same variety is http://www.corkirish.com/wordpress/my-irish-english-dictionary, but you won't find this particular word listed in either of them.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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