księżyc - Gaelainn

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-08, 20:20

I remember. Actually, I was reading that chapter a bit after our conversation here.

Added bonus: it's among the chapters I'm reviewing this week anyway. :P

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-14, 1:01

I almost forgot to ask!

I'm contemplating getting back into watching some TG4 (you know, so I can get more exposure and what not). But I'm wondering if it's the right move or not, concidering I'm trying to focus on Munster.

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby kevin » 2018-01-14, 18:52

I think if you're looking for traditional dialectal language in media, your chances are probably better with Raidió na Gaeltachta than with TG4. But of course, if you want to restrict yourself to a single dialect, you'll have to select the right programmes in either case, and radio is probably harder to understand that TV because you get less context.

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-14, 19:01

My thought is, any Irish exposure is good exposure. So long as I understand that it will not always be in the dialect I'm learning (if in dialect at all).

I just am not sure if I should restrict myself or throw caution to the wind at my stage of the learning process.

I do like the RnG idea though! :)

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby kevin » 2018-01-14, 20:31

Yeah, I wouldn't like the idea of restricting my exposure to Irish to a certain dialect. I thought you were attempting to do this, but if you're not, then sure, any Irish is good. And in fact, figuring out whch of the major dialects a speaker is using isn't too hard, even if you don't actually understand what they are saying.

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-14, 20:41

I mean, as I said, due to family connections and such, I do want to focus on Munster Irish, but I don't expect to build a wall around this concept.

Plus, (again) as I've said before, I would like to to learn the other dialects and the CO.

I just prefer to use Munster. :P

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-15, 1:16

TG4 is producing an animated adaption of An Béal Bocht. :D

I just watched the first episode. Which unfortunately is the only one so far.

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-15, 18:49

Am I correct in saying the the copula is is pronounced /ɪʃ/ when the following word starts with a slender vowel?

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby linguoboy » 2018-01-15, 20:36

księżycowy wrote:Am I correct in saying the the copula is is pronounced /ɪʃ/ when the following word starts with a slender vowel?

'Sea.
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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-15, 21:14

Go raibh maith agat! :)

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-16, 17:34

It seems I'm on a pronunciation kick right now, but I was curious about the question particle an. Is the <n> frequently dropped in normal speech? Or are my ears that bad?

For example, I hear an bhfuil as /ə wil´/

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby kevin » 2018-01-16, 18:02

Yes. Though I'd say that in normal speech, it's often completely dropped and the only thing that is left is the eclipsis.

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-28, 14:22

It's been perhaps a bit longer than I'm sure you hoped for, Linguoboy, but here you go, my attempt at this translation:
Raghad don ollscoil amáireach d'fhann tá ardmharcanna ag mo thriail. (I'm not quite sure how to say "make-up exam")

Now, time to peek at your version to see how horribly I did. :P

EDIT: Wow, not even close.

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby linguoboy » 2018-01-28, 15:05

księżycowy wrote:It's been perhaps a bit longer than I'm sure you hoped for, Linguoboy, but here you go, my attempt at this translation:
Raghad don ollscoil amáireach d'fhann tá ardmharcanna ag mo thriail. (I'm not quite sure how to say "make-up exam")

Now, time to peek at your version to see how horribly I did. :P

EDIT: Wow, not even close.

The first part is okay except for the use of do instead of one of the prepositions designated for verbs of motion. D'fhann is presumably a typo for d'fhonn, which would be fine here with a different syntax (either a verbal noun phrase or a go-clause.

Triail is "test" rather than "examination". Scrúdú is a bit more specific, but I don't think it's wrong to use triail here.
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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-01-28, 20:25

linguoboy wrote:The first part is okay except for the use of do instead of one of the prepositions designated for verbs of motion.

I was going to ask why there where two (well more like three) ways to say "to" in Irish and which to use, but after your correction, I remembered Lesson XII gives a full list of prepositions and explains a few nuances. I should have used go dtí, like you did.

Though on a side note, what the hell does the abbreviation "c." mean in relation to the preposition list? "Gen." I get ("genitive"), but not the "c."

D'fhann is presumably a typo for d'fhonn, which would be fine here with a different syntax (either a verbal noun phrase or a go-clause.

Yes, it was a typo. For some reason I thought it was spelled with an <a>. :hmm:

Just for the fun of it, I'll rework my sentence with your corrections.

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-02-05, 18:58

I feel I need a refresher, is it acceptable to say:
Múinteoir is ea me.

I'm also curious about the pronunciation of verbs like scríobhaim
Specifically, is it the case that <bh> would only be pronounced in this verb if it's at the end of a word? That's my impression thus far.

For example,
scríobhaim /ʃgri:m/
scríobh /ʃgri:v/

If true, I assume this works for <mh> as well?

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby linguoboy » 2018-02-05, 19:08

księżycowy wrote:I feel I need a refresher, is it acceptable to say:
Múinteoir is ea mé.

'Sea.

księżycowy wrote:I'm also curious about the pronunciation of verbs like scríobhaim
Specifically, is it the case that <bh> would only be pronounced in this verb if it's at the end of a word? That's my impression thus far.

For example,
scríobhaim /ʃgri:m/
scríobh /ʃgri:v/

If true, I assume this works for <mh> as well?

It is not true.

I recommend reading the section in Ó Cuív where he talks about the deletion of medial consonants and the coalescence of vowels. I don't have it to hand, so I can't say for sure that it doesn't happen adjacent to long vowels, but that's my recollection. I also can't really think of cases where you have a front vowel and a back consonant or vice versa.
Last edited by linguoboy on 2018-02-05, 19:13, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-02-05, 19:11

So then what dictates whether <bh> is pronounced as a vowel and when it's pronounced as /v/? (Which is what I was attempting to ask before. :P )

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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby linguoboy » 2018-02-05, 19:18

księżycowy wrote:So then what dictates whether <bh> is pronounced as a vowel and when it's pronounced as /v/? (Which is what I was attempting to ask before. :P )

The cases I can think of all involve two short vowels coalescing to a front vowel when the consonant is slender (e.g. Muimhneach /ˈmiːnʹəx/) or to a diphthong when it's broad (e.g. meabhair /ˈmʹəurʹ/). But like I said, Ó Cuív discusses this at relative length.
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Re: księżyc - Gaelainn

Postby księżycowy » 2018-02-05, 19:27

I'll check out Ó Cuív when I get home in a bit.

I expected you to recommend reading Ó Cuív, by the way. :P


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