[Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

swoonie99
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Re:Scottish Gaelic for Wedding Invite

Postby swoonie99 » 2012-06-09, 21:21

Hello,

Can someone help with the following translation to Scottish Gaelic for a wedding invitation?

"You are invited"

"June and Richard"

"Eat, drink, celebrate"

"Share our special day"

Thank you!!!!!

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby morgenc » 2013-05-02, 15:54

I am looking for a simple translation for "Without you, My beloved" Thank you for your help. My husband was Scottish and spoke the Gaelic but I am not and do not. I speak German, Spanish, English, Swedish, some Italian, French and my native Turkish, if that would help anyone out. I lost him recently and just want a simple saying to go under a picture. I am currently looking for a class to learn his language better. Again, thank you for your help.

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Lewis91 » 2013-05-04, 10:25

morgenc wrote:I am looking for a simple translation for "Without you, My beloved" Thank you for your help. My husband was Scottish and spoke the Gaelic but I am not and do not. I speak German, Spanish, English, Swedish, some Italian, French and my native Turkish, if that would help anyone out. I lost him recently and just want a simple saying to go under a picture. I am currently looking for a class to learn his language better. Again, thank you for your help.


"Às d' aonais, a ghràidh"

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby morgenc » 2013-05-05, 15:01

Thank you for the response. I was close but had it a little wrong. I really appreciate you help.

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Lewis91 » 2013-05-06, 19:03

'S e ur beatha|You're welcome.

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby martha2 » 2013-06-03, 12:53

May I ask is this Gaelic? I think maybe Irish instead? "Gan Liet" ? I'm not sure what this means if anything. Thanks to you all.

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby ceid donn » 2013-06-03, 13:18

martha2 wrote:May I ask is this Gaelic? I think maybe Irish instead? "Gan Liet" ? I'm not sure what this means if anything. Thanks to you all.


"Liet" isn't a Gaelic word. "ie" isn't a vowel combination you really find in Gaelic, nor is t used as a final letter very often. Unless it's a misspelling. I doubt it's irish as well, as Irish follows very similar spelling conventions.

According to Google Translate, this is Latvian for "although the case".

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby morlader » 2013-06-03, 14:27

It'd likely be very tricky to determine which language it is just from those two words. Where did you see them?
An lavar coth yw lavar gwir:
Na vedn nevra dos vas a davas re hir;
Bes den heb tavas a gollas y dir.
[flag=]kw[/flag]

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Sectori » 2013-06-03, 15:40

A Google search for "gan liet" turns up a bunch of results in Indonesian.
agus tha mo chluasan eòlach air a’ mhac-talla fhathast / às dèidh dhomh dùsgadh
(mona nicleòid wagner, “fo shneachd”)

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Ciarán12 » 2013-06-03, 17:25

"gan liet" is definitely not Irish anyway.

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby KMackendry » 2013-09-10, 19:28

I need the Scottish Gaelic translation for: My heart is heavy but my soul is strong

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby GingaNinja13 » 2014-01-23, 23:26

Wondering if I translated these correctly:

tiugainn comhla rium
cum mo làmh
leig gràdh thoir thu air falbh

Come with me
Take my hand
Let love carry you away

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby ceid donn » 2014-01-24, 1:42

GingaNinja13 wrote:Wondering if I translated these correctly:

tiugainn comhla rium
cum mo làmh
leig gràdh thoir thu air falbh

Come with me
Take my hand
Let love carry you away


Thank you for giving it a shot yourself. :D

I'm no Gaelic poet, but if I had to translate this, I'd say:

Falbh comhla rium
Gabh mo làmh
Leig le gaol gad thogail air falbh



Falbh and thig/tighinn (which I think you meant) are often translated as "to go" and "to come" in English but they have very specific connotations that don't really align with English words, s in a case like this, falbh can also mean "to come". Thig means "to come", as in arriving someplace. I am coming home/I am arriving home--that sense of "to come". It's the sense of you heading somewhere. Falbh means more like "to depart" with more of a sense of leaving a place rather heading toward a place. I'm leaving now, do you want to come with me? That's when you'd use falbh instead of thig.

Gabh is the verb you want in the second line. Cum means to keep or hold on to something but it doesn't mean the action of taking a hold of something. To ask someone or tell someone to take a hold of your hand you'd say Gabh mo làmh.

Leig means to let or allow, but to say "Let X do Y" you have to use the preposition le (with/by) with it, or leig takes a different relationship to the subject, gaol, rendering that sentence incoherent.

Gaol is the word used for more romantic love. Gràdh is used for more familiar love, like with your spouse or your child.

Tog/togail air falbh is the verbal phrase for "lift/carry away". Thoir air falbh means to carry something away too, but it's more like taking the garbage away or carrying off someone's luggage. Tog means to lift and carry/put/take something somewhere, depending on what prepositions are used with it, and it can be used for things like saying someone's spirit or heart was lifted up, in that spiritual or emotional sense. I think it's definitely the better verb choice here.

The gad is tricky thing with Gaelic. It's a compound possessive pronoun that means "at your (singular)", so that literally translates as "Let by love at your lifting away". It's terrible English but it's better Gaelic. It's just how Gaelic says that sort of thing when the direct object in a pronoun. If I want to say "I am hearing you" I wouldn't say "Tha mi a' cluinntinn thu" but "Tha mi gad chluinntinn" (literally, I am at your hearing).

Lastly, gad, along with gam (at my) and ga (at his), lenite the following verb when possible, so that's why it's thogail and not togail.

Tha mi 'n dòchas gu bheil seo cuideachail air do shon. / I hope this is helpful for you. :D

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby GingaNinja13 » 2014-01-24, 3:29

ceid donn wrote:
GingaNinja13 wrote:Wondering if I translated these correctly:

tiugainn comhla rium
cum mo làmh
leig gràdh thoir thu air falbh

Come with me
Take my hand
Let love carry you away


Thank you for giving it a shot yourself. :D

I'm no Gaelic poet, but if I had to translate this, I'd say:

Falbh comhla rium
Gabh mo làmh
Leig le gaol gad thogail air falbh



Falbh and thig/tighinn (which I think you meant) are often translated as "to go" and "to come" in English but they have very specific connotations that don't really align with English words, s in a case like this, falbh can also mean "to come". Thig means "to come", as in arriving someplace. I am coming home/I am arriving home--that sense of "to come". It's the sense of you heading somewhere. Falbh means more like "to depart" with more of a sense of leaving a place rather heading toward a place. I'm leaving now, do you want to come with me? That's when you'd use falbh instead of thig.

Gabh is the verb you want in the second line. Cum means to keep or hold on to something but it doesn't mean the action of taking a hold of something. To ask someone or tell someone to take a hold of your hand you'd say Gabh mo làmh.

Leig means to let or allow, but to say "Let X do Y" you have to use the preposition le (with/by) with it, or leig takes a different relationship to the subject, gaol, rendering that sentence incoherent.

Gaol is the word used for more romantic love. Gràdh is used for more familiar love, like with your spouse or your child.

Tog/togail air falbh is the verbal phrase for "lift/carry away". Thoir air falbh means to carry something away too, but it's more like taking the garbage away or carrying off someone's luggage. Tog means to lift and carry/put/take something somewhere, depending on what prepositions are used with it, and it can be used for things like saying someone's spirit or heart was lifted up, in that spiritual or emotional sense. I think it's definitely the better verb choice here.

The gad is tricky thing with Gaelic. It's a compound possessive pronoun that means "at your (singular)", so that literally translates as "Let by love at your lifting away". It's terrible English but it's better Gaelic. It's just how Gaelic says that sort of thing when the direct object in a pronoun. If I want to say "I am hearing you" I wouldn't say "Tha mi a' cluinntinn thu" but "Tha mi gad chluinntinn" (literally, I am at your hearing).

Lastly, gad, along with gam (at my) and ga (at his), lenite the following verb when possible, so that's why it's thogail and not togail.

Tha mi 'n dòchas gu bheil seo cuideachail air do shon. / I hope this is helpful for you. :D


Thank you very much! That is VERY helpful!

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby deyrishav » 2014-04-01, 11:19

Well this is completely off topic. I was wondering if the following translation from English to Scottish Gaelic is correct.
English- I drink only whisky
S Gaelic- Òl uisge-beatha a-mhàin
Any help will be much appreciated.
Thanks.

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby linguoboy » 2014-04-01, 17:23

deyrishav wrote:Well this is completely off topic.

Actually, it's completely on topic. After all, this is the thread reserved for Scottish Gaelic translation requests.

deyrishav wrote:I was wondering if the following translation from English to Scottish Gaelic is correct.
English- I drink only whisky
S Gaelic- Òl uisge-beatha a-mhàin
Any help will be much appreciated.
Thanks.

No, because you've left out the subject.

I don't speak Scottish-Gaelic, but if I were to translate that into Irish, it would be:

"Ní hólaim ach fuiscí." (Lit. "I don't drink but whiskey")

Were I would to translate this directly into Gaelic, it would yield:

"Chan òl mi ach uisge-beatha."

Scottish-Gaelic might use a different construction, however. Hopefully a fluent speaker will speak up and let us know.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby missamiss » 2014-05-10, 6:28

hello new here,
Questions about the word "Dancer" in Scottish Gaelic.
I believe the translation is Dannsair, but I've also seen it spelled Damhsair.
Is the later an older more archaic version of the word?
I also noticed that both of the words are labeled masculine in the dictionary.
Does that mean there is a feminine version of the word Dancer?
If so what is it and how is it pronounced?

thank you for your time

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby campbellke » 2014-08-26, 18:17

I'm trying to figure out the best way to translate "To live in the hearts we leave behind, is not to die." The lack of "to live" and "to die" is one of the things making this difficult, so I'm thinking if I can reword it, it's kind of a "close enough" scenario. This is what i have:

Chan e básachadh a th'ann, a bhith beo anns na chridheachan a dh'fhág sinn as ar déidh.

How wrong am I? Any suggestions? My brain hurts...

Thank you so much all!

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby Beck » 2015-06-19, 0:36

Hi,

May someone please translate "My Family, My Blood, My Life" into Scottish Gaelic for me? Thank you

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Re: [Scottish Gaelic] Translation requests

Postby linguoboy » 2015-06-19, 15:17

I've been meaning to post this for a while:

"So you want a Scottish Gaelic tattoo": Part 1 Part 2
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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