Kaypi Yachakukrinchikmi: Here We Learn

User avatar
bluechiron
Posts: 275
Joined: 2004-11-02, 5:18
Real Name: LS
Gender: female
Location: El mundo de Nunca Jamás

Kaypi Yachakukrinchikmi: Here We Learn

Postby bluechiron » 2005-05-17, 3:03

Shukniki kallarinkapak

Because Quichua was originally written down by Spanish missionaries and conquistadores, the alphabet follows the Spanish alphabet. This continued into modern times as a way of supporting national integration. This changed in the 1980s as Ecuatorian Indian movements pushed towards a more functional alphabet, and towards Unified Quechua.

Older Alphabet--Still used in many texts and most dictionaries

A
B
C
CH
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
LL
M
N
Ñ
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

"Current" Alphabet

A
B
(C-most of which changed to K)
CH
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
LL
M
N
Ñ
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W (generally replaces all -hua- and -gua- spellings)
X
Y
Z

Pronunciation is very similar to Spanish, although this will once again depend on the region.
Shukta shimi yuyankapak, kanpa ñawikunata wichkana ushankakunarakmi kanpa shungutawan uyankirakpish.
To know another language, first your eyes will have to be open, and you will have to listen with your heart.

User avatar
bluechiron
Posts: 275
Joined: 2004-11-02, 5:18
Real Name: LS
Gender: female
Location: El mundo de Nunca Jamás

Postby bluechiron » 2005-05-17, 3:21

Ishkayniki

Pronouns

ñuka - I/yo
kan - you/tú, informal
pay - he, she, it / él, ella
kikin - you/Ud., formal
ñukanchik - we/nosotros*
kikinkuna - y'all/ Uds.
paykuna - they/ellos, ellas

*In Quichua there is no division between inclusive and exclusive, although this does exist in other forms of Quechua.

These pronouns can be used subject pronouns (used as is) or other objects (with specific suffixes). Subject pronouns are optional in sentences (as in Spanish) because conjugation reveals the intended person.

Speaking of conjugation, this is the perfect time to mention that there are NO irregular verbs in Quichua! Infinitives end in the -na form, such as rina, kana, and munana.

Present tense

Rina - to go

rin-i
rin-ki
rin
rin-chik
rin-kichik
rin-kuna

Kana - to be

kan-i
kan-ki
kan
kan-chik
kan-kichik
kan-kuna

Munana - to want

munan-i
munan-ki
munan
munan-chik
munan-kichik
munan-kuna

Possible exercises - !!please submit in the discussion section if you choose to do any exercises!!

Conjugate: kuna (to give), yachana (to study), rantina (to buy), killkana (to write), killkakatina (to read), purina (to walk), pukllana (to play), rimana (to talk), rikuna (to see, to watch), and mikuna (to eat).

You will need these verbs in future exercises. :D
Shukta shimi yuyankapak, kanpa ñawikunata wichkana ushankakunarakmi kanpa shungutawan uyankirakpish.
To know another language, first your eyes will have to be open, and you will have to listen with your heart.

User avatar
bluechiron
Posts: 275
Joined: 2004-11-02, 5:18
Real Name: LS
Gender: female
Location: El mundo de Nunca Jamás

Postby bluechiron » 2005-05-17, 15:35

Kimsaniki

Let's get ready to read a short text and write some basic sentences. This will also be an introduction to the first two suffixes.

-KA

-Ka is a subject, or nominative case marker. It is used in almost every sentence, unless the subject pronoun is omitted, or the phrase is a question.

Some examples:

Mamaka antawatata ministin. Mother needs a car.

Ñukaka mikunata munani. I want to eat.

As you can see, -ta is another suffix of extreme importance.

-TA

-Ta has several uses, but can basically be described as the direct object marker, or accusative case marker.

Some examples:

Kanka apiyuta rantinki. You buy a horse.

Ñukanchikka kamuta killkakatinchik. We read a book.
Shukta shimi yuyankapak, kanpa ñawikunata wichkana ushankakunarakmi kanpa shungutawan uyankirakpish.
To know another language, first your eyes will have to be open, and you will have to listen with your heart.

User avatar
bluechiron
Posts: 275
Joined: 2004-11-02, 5:18
Real Name: LS
Gender: female
Location: El mundo de Nunca Jamás

Postby bluechiron » 2005-05-23, 20:02

Chuskuniki

A few more suffixes:

-MI

-Mi is an affirmative particle that can also add emphasis.

Imashina kanki? – How are you?

Allimi. – Good (affirmed/emphasized)

Placement of the –mi is more flexible than other suffixes. It usually occurs on the verb.

Payka paltata mikunmi. - S/He eats avocado.

It can also occur on an adverb.

Payka may allimi mikun. - S/He eats very well.

In certain other instances, -mi may fall in other places, but this is not as common. There is also no repetition of –mi in a sentence; it should occur only once, with the possible exception of very long, complex sentences.

One special use of –mi is that it can be used to omit the verb kana (to be) when using the third person singular.

Payka hatunmi. - S/He is big.

Nicolas shutimi. - His name is Nicolas.


-CHU

-Chu is a negating suffix. It is used primarily in two cases. In questions, it is used when expecting a yes/no answer, and would probably not qualify as a linguistic tag.

Paltata munankichu? - Do you want avocado?

Apiyuta rantinkirakchu? - Did you already buy a horse?

The second case is in negative sentences.

Mana yachanichu. - I don’t know.

Placement is primarily after the verb, but on occasion can be on the adverb.

Imashina kanki?

Mana allichu.


-PI

-Pi is a locative (but not solely locative) suffix. It can mean –in, -at, or –on.

Ekuadorpi kana munanchik. – We like being in Ecuador.

Wasipi kankichu? – Are you at home?


Short Exercise

Translate.*

R: Imanalla, Pedro. Imashina kanki?

P: Allimi, Rodolfo. Imashina kanki?

R: Allimi. Pedro, mikunata munankichu? Paltata charinimi.

P: Mana mikunata munanichu. Wasipi mikuni.

R: Paltata kunimi. Wasipi mikunki.

*This is not yet at the level of natural conversation, therefore the translations should seem a little “stilted”.
Shukta shimi yuyankapak, kanpa ñawikunata wichkana ushankakunarakmi kanpa shungutawan uyankirakpish.
To know another language, first your eyes will have to be open, and you will have to listen with your heart.

User avatar
nettchelobek1
Posts: 1694
Joined: 2006-04-17, 21:59
Real Name: Francisco R. Trejo Campos
Gender: male
Location: Chilangolandia
Country: MX Mexico (México)
Contact:

Postby nettchelobek1 » 2006-06-01, 3:45

Will anybody continue with the lessons? They look very interesting... what a pit that the lessons came to a halt... :cry:
"From relativity ... one obtains an unequivocal proof for the view of philosophers who, like Parmenides, Kant, and the modern idealists, deny the objectivity of change as an illusion or appearance due to our special mode of perception" Gödel.

User avatar
Rikita
Posts: 585
Joined: 2005-05-22, 1:44
Gender: female
Location: Bln, Dtl

Postby Rikita » 2006-06-29, 15:51

It is a pity indeed... I have been thinking for a while if I could do something about this (as the Quichua forum was why I originally joined unilang)... Unfortunately I don't know Quichua at all. I learned some Cusco Quechua, but don't speak a lot of that either. I have books though, and could do lessons with the help of those books (only question is, would that be against any copyrights? I wouldn't just copy the book, but I would copy parts of it I suppose)... so the question is, should that be done in a different forum (as it would que Cusco Quechua, rather than Ecuadorian Quichua), and would there even be interest?

It is kind of sad if there is no lessons and discussion at all on unilang about this beautiful language...

User avatar
EROZ
Posts: 90
Joined: 2006-06-20, 21:18
Real Name: diego ferro
Gender: male
Location: none

Postby EROZ » 2006-08-09, 0:42

Rikita wrote:It is a pity indeed... I have been thinking for a while if I could do something about this (as the Quichua forum was why I originally joined unilang)... Unfortunately I don't know Quichua at all. I learned some Cusco Quechua, but don't speak a lot of that either. I have books though, and could do lessons with the help of those books (only question is, would that be against any copyrights? I wouldn't just copy the book, but I would copy parts of it I suppose)... so the question is, should that be done in a different forum (as it would que Cusco Quechua, rather than Ecuadorian Quichua), and would there even be interest?

It is kind of sad if there is no lessons and discussion at all on unilang about this beautiful language...
Teachers make lessons from books, so I think there will be no problem with any copyrights (unless you try to sell your lessons, I think)
About in which forum? I say here. Just title your threads as Cusco Quechua.
I also think that you'll learn a lot just by trying to teach us (and later you may teach quechua in schools or something)
So when do we start Miss! :)

User avatar
Rikita
Posts: 585
Joined: 2005-05-22, 1:44
Gender: female
Location: Bln, Dtl

Postby Rikita » 2006-08-10, 21:44

hm... okay, i will try, especially because i think you are right that i will learn a lot this way, myself... and maybe one day someone comes by who knows more than i do, and helps us...

the only thing is that i am going on vacation soon, so i will try to get a few lessons done before that, and then continue when i am back...

*goes off with book to try to create the first lesson*...

Nero

Postby Nero » 2006-08-10, 22:09

Thank you, Rikita!

I like these american indian languages. They are interesting.

I used to speak a little quechua, long ago.
:)

Pilámaya, Rikita!

Iyapi ikcéwicáša uŋ kiŋ léna tewicawáhila. awaciŋpiwašte unpi.

Eháŋni Quechua kítanla wowaglake. :)

User avatar
Alcadras
Posts: 5508
Joined: 2005-04-16, 11:45
Real Name: Mirac Özdağ
Gender: male
Location: Ankara
Country: TR Turkey (Türkiye)

Postby Alcadras » 2006-08-11, 19:10

Quechua was added to list. :P

User avatar
Rikita
Posts: 585
Joined: 2005-05-22, 1:44
Gender: female
Location: Bln, Dtl

Postby Rikita » 2006-08-11, 20:28

what do you mean by added to list?

Nero

Postby Nero » 2006-08-11, 20:47

Rikita wrote:what do you mean by added to list?


Yeah, I'd like to know also

Ita, Quoque ego cupio scire.

User avatar
Alcadras
Posts: 5508
Joined: 2005-04-16, 11:45
Real Name: Mirac Özdağ
Gender: male
Location: Ankara
Country: TR Turkey (Türkiye)

Postby Alcadras » 2006-08-12, 9:51

Rikita wrote:what do you mean by added to list?

I mean,i want to learn it. :wink:

Nero

Postby Nero » 2006-08-13, 22:35

Alcadras wrote:
Rikita wrote:what do you mean by added to list?

I mean,i want to learn it. :wink:


Ah Alcadras.

nitáowapi el Lakóta eyagnake ca waŋbláke.
héoŋ iblúškiŋ :wink: wíyuŋgapi wicaluhá eháŋtaš, lél waun yelo


[Ah Alcadras]

[Your-list on Lakota you-put-it (ca-particle) I-see]
[Thefore I-am-happy] :wink: [Questions you-have-them if, here I-am assertion]

Ah Alcadras

I see that you've added Lakota in your list.
So I'm happy :wink:. If you have questions, I'm here


Return to “Central and South American Indigenous Languages”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest