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Posted: 2005-06-05, 1:21
by Rikita
Peruvian seems most likely, yes... But of course there is more than one Peruvian Quechua...

Well anyway to me this seems Cuzqueno, but I don't know enough yet to be sure, and also haven't really read anything but Cuzqueno and Ayacuchano yet. Ayacuchano I think uses more often the trivocalica writing as does this texts, but doesn't have aspiratives and glottal stops - and in Cuzco the trivocalica is becoming more common too I think.

Posted: 2005-06-23, 15:47
by bluechiron
So here's the big question: is anyone interested in more lessons? We had only just started really, but I'd like to know if there is any interest.

Runa shimita yachankichikchu_

Mana achka tiempo charinichu shinaka munayta tiyakpi kutin yachaykunata charinchikman.

Posted: 2006-08-11, 19:31
by Alcadras
Kuni
kunki
kun
kunchik
kunkichik
kunkuna

yachani
yachanki
yachan
yachanchik
yachankichik
yachankuna

rantini
rantinki
rantin
rantinchik
rantinkichik
rantinkuna

killkani
killkanki
killkan
killkanchik
killkankichik
killkankuna

killkakatini
killkakatinki
killkatakin
killkatakinchik
killkatakinkichik
killkatakinkuna

purini
purinki
purin
purinchik
purinkichik
purinkuna

pukllani
pukllanki
pukllan
pukllanchik
pukllankichik
pukllankuna

rimani
rimanki
riman
rimanchik
rimankichik
rimankuna

rikuni
rikunki
rikun
rikunchik
rikunkichik
rikunkuna

mikuni
mikunki
mikun
mikunchik
mikunkichik
mikunkuna


-Got a question about word order.

Nukaka mikunata munani. = I want to eat.
(I-eat-to want.)
Can't i say "nukaka munani mikunata" ?

Posted: 2006-08-11, 20:50
by Nero
Hahaha Alcadras, and you thought Lakota verbs were hard.... :lol:

Posted: 2006-08-12, 13:55
by Alcadras
:D It's combinations are harder than Quichua.

By the way,are there any useful dictionaries? I couldn't find any. :roll:

Posted: 2006-08-12, 15:00
by Alcadras
Alcadras wrote:-Got a question about word order.

Nukaka mikunata munani. = I want to eat.
(I-eat-to want.)
Can't i say "nukaka munani mikunata" ?

I asked an important question,can anyone answer please? Rikita? Bluechiron? :roll:

Posted: 2006-08-12, 23:36
by Nero
Alcadras wrote::D It's combinations are harder than Quichua.

By the way,are there any useful dictionaries? I couldn't find any. :roll:


For Quechua or Lakota? :lol:

If you mean Quechua:
http://www.quechuanetwork.org/dictionary.cfm?lang=e (this dictionary doesn't work sometimes - but it's pretty extensive)

If you mean Lakota:
I had to buy a dictionary, because I couldn't find one. I might just have to make one online soon :x

Posted: 2006-08-13, 6:25
by Alcadras
Dyuspagrasunki Nero!

Nukaka yachanata munani.

Posted: 2006-08-13, 21:44
by Nero
Alcadras wrote:
Alcadras wrote:-Got a question about word order.

Nukaka mikunata munani. = I want to eat.
(I-eat-to want.)
Can't i say "nukaka munani mikunata" ?

I asked an important question,can anyone answer please? Rikita? Bluechiron? :roll:


Hmmm.

Ă‘ukaka mikunata munani. I want to eat.
I-(subject) to-eat-(object) I-want

I would imagine that it could the other way too, though in Lakota and other American Indian languages, it's usually something SOV. I believe as long as the particles are added to the words (ta, ka), it gets the meaning across.

Then again, in english it would be kinda odd to hear:
To eat I want.
but we get the meaning

Posted: 2006-08-14, 22:55
by Rikita
i'd agree with nero...
Though you can sometimes change word order for emphasis...

Re: Kayman Shamurapay, Rimankapak : Come Here to Discuss

Posted: 2014-12-04, 20:21
by vijayjohn
It's not like I'm expecting to get answers soon or anything, but I have a few questions anyway. :P

1. Does anybody know whether -di is used as an emphatic suffix in Imbabura Quechua? I found a paper that seems to suggest it is. And if that's true, does it have a cognate in Cusco Quechua, and if so, what is it?

2. Rikita listed the following kinship terms on another thread:
apuski, apucha - grandfather
hatucha - grandmother
haway, willka - grandchild
awkillu - great-grandfather
awkilla - great-grandmother
anpullu - great-grandchild
chupullu - great-great-grandchild

If these words and translations are correct, how do you say 'great-great-grandfather' or 'great-great-grandmother'?