Cocama language

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Massimiliano B
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Cocama language

Postby Massimiliano B » 2018-03-08, 12:06

It is a Tupi-Guarani language spoken by 250 people in Peru and few in other countries. There is a good publication here, in Spanish:

http://www.peru.sil.org/es/resources/archives/30144

This language sounds typically "South American" to me. I'll translate some sentences literally, from the link above (lesson 1).

Era na cuema? = Good your morning?

Era ta cuema. = Good my morning.

Macatipa nutsu = Where-to (macatipa) you-go (n-utsu)?

Ta/tsa cuca tutsu/tsutsu = I farm-to (cu-ca) I-go (t-utsu).
"Ta" means "I", when the speaker is a man. If a woman is speaking, she says "tsa". In a similar way, the prefix t- (I) becomes ts- when the speaker is a woman

Tutsunan/tsutsunan= I-go-now (t-utsu-nan).

Macatipa nutsui? = Where-to you-went? (the final -i marks the past tense).

Ta cuca tutsui/tsutsui = My farm-to (cu-ca) I-went (t-utsui).

Tirihua/Chirihua tsapa = I-return immediately.
The prefix t- become ch- before i-, when the speaker is a woman.

Peca tutsu/tsutsu = Harbor-to (pe-ca) I-go.

Tucaca tutsu = My-home-to (t[a]-uca-ca) I-go.
The same prefix is a possessive pronoun before a noun, and a personal pronoun before a verb.

Nacà tutsu = You-to I-go. (I'm coming where you are).

Ta mamaca tutsu = My (Ta) mother-to (mama-ca) I-go (t-utsu).

Ta papaca tutsui = My father-to (papa-ca) I-went (t-utsui).

Iquitoca tutsui = Iquito-to I-went.
Last edited by Massimiliano B on 2018-03-09, 22:04, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Cocama language

Postby księżycowy » 2018-03-08, 13:10

Maybe you or Ser could translate some lessons from a South American language?

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Re: Cocama language

Postby Massimiliano B » 2018-03-08, 13:36

I could try. Which language?

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Re: Cocama language

Postby księżycowy » 2018-03-08, 14:36

I havent thought of one yet. Any recommendations?

I'm down for something weird. :silly:

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Re: Cocama language

Postby Massimiliano B » 2018-03-08, 14:47

księżycowy wrote:
I'm down for something weird. :silly:



Choose some language!... Maybe Cocama is not too weird.

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Re: Cocama language

Postby księżycowy » 2018-03-08, 14:49

I'll think on it some, and get back to you. Thanks Mass!

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Re: Cocama language

Postby Massimiliano B » 2018-03-09, 22:01

księżycowy wrote:I'll think on it some, and get back to you. Thanks Mass!


Ok!



From lesson 2 (page 15 http://www.peru.sil.org/es/resources/archives/30144)


Cocama has the phoneme [ɨ], the close central unrounded vowel, which is typically found in many South American Indigenous languages.

Personal pronoun: ta/tsa (my), na (your), ra/ya (his, her, its), ini (our - inclusive), tana/penu (our - exclusive), epe (your - plural), rana/inu (their).
When two forms are given, the second one is used by a female speaker.

The vowel of the possessive adjective is lost when the noun begins with a vowel; in this case, the pronoun is written as one word with the noun:

Ta mama = My mother.
Tuca = My-home (t-uca).

When a noun begins with y and the preceding possessive is composed by one syllable, the final vowel of the pronoun is lost and the y- changes into i-:
ta (my) + yaiche (mother-in-law) = tiaiche (my mother-in-law)
When the possessive tsa- precedes a noun wich begins with y-, it becomes ts-. The union between ts- and -y is chi-:
tsa- +yaiche = chaiche (my mother in law)
When tsa- precedes a noun which begins with i, it becomes ch-.

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Re: Cocama language

Postby Massimiliano B » 2018-03-11, 15:44

From lesson 3 (http://www.peru.sil.org/es/resources/archives/30144)

ñ = like in Spanish.


-tipa is an interrogative suffix:

Mañatipa ene? (how you-singular) = How are you?
Eranan ta (good I) = I am good


The suffix- -tara means "in order to":

Macatipa rutsui? (Where-to he/she-went) = Where did he/she go?
Cuca rutsui cupetara ( cu-ca = farm-to; r-utsu-i = he/she-go-past; cupe-tara = cultivate-(reason) = He/she went to the farm and cultivate.

The sentence "iquiaca niapɨca" (iquia-ca na-yapɨca) means "sit down here". Iquià means "this, here"; the suffix -ca means "in"; the prefix na- means "you" and the verb yapɨca means "to sit. na+yapɨca = niapɨca (see rule in lesson 2, page 16).


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