***NAHUATL COURSE***

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Mizton
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-06-11, 5:40

Oh no, I never said Nahuatl "ll" was supposed to be pronounced as in Spanish "ll". I am telling you that it is fine if you pronounce it as a simple "L", as in... what do u speak? German... as in German "alle" :P
And yes, it would be cool if I did some excercises for all this, but it's already a bit of work to organize and edit the lessons ('cause I do some extra reasearch, instead of just copying my notes, put some order to them, and translate it all into English), and each time I end up not wanting to know anything else about it :P I might post some excercises one day :mrgreen:
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Psi-Lord » 2009-06-11, 5:43

IPA-wise, the Wikipedia article on Nahuatl orthography says <ll> is just /lː/ (that is, a geminated /l/). Only Mizton can say whether this is precise enough, though. :)
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-06-11, 6:57

Thank you Psi-Lord, yes, geminated /l/ is the correct description of it :)
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2009-06-11, 22:12

Ah ok, I know IPA so that helps a lot. 8-) :wink:

Mizton, what would "The person after/below me"/"The following/next person" (or whatever) be in Nahuatl? (Or at least one way.) Maybe we could get the game up and going. :)
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-06-15, 0:48

Ok I would say "in tlacatl nicampa" (the person behind me), and "in tlacatl nixpan" (the person infront of me).
'Cause I know you can say "in tlacatl notloc" for "the person next to me", but it doesn't say if it is before or after... "in tlacatl nopan" would be "the person above me", but i am having trouble with "the person below", that's why the ones highlighted would be my suggestions. :)
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-06-16, 22:27

LESSON 16

Hello there, welcome to lesson number 16 8-) . We have already seen transitive verbs, and along with them, we saw the object particle for the third person (him/her/it) C/QUI, and the object particles for “(to) people” TE, and “(to) things” TLA (Lessons 8 & 9). Well, now we are going to learn the (direct/indirect) object particles for the rest of the personal pronouns. Here they are:

OBJECT PARTICLES
Nehuatl – Nech = (to) me
Tehuatl – Mitz = (to) you
Yehuatl – C/qui = (to) him/her/it
Tehuan – Tech = (to) us
Anmehuan – Anmech = (to) you (plural)
Yehuan – Quin = (to) them

So, if you remember what we saw before, “I eat this meat” would be “(Nehuatl) niccua inin nacatl”, right? With the C between the conjugation pronoun and the verb indicating “it”, in this case. So literally “I eat it, this meat”. Well, the other object particles we just saw are used like that too. Let’s see some examples:

Nimitzmaca (Ni + mitz + maca) = I give you…
Antechmacah inin xochicualli = You (people) give us this fruit
Quinmacaz inon mecanonotzalli = he will give them that phone
Tinechtlazohtla? = do you love me?
Amini oquimictili in mazatl = the hunter killed the deer

DIMINUTIVE
Let’s see the diminutive ending, equivalent to “ito/ita” endings in Spanish, or… “little…” in English maybe? The ending is: TON/ TOTON.
That’s where Mizton (cat) comes from. Because Miztli means puma, mountain lion. But “little puma” would be the domestic cat: Mizton or miztontli.


VOCABULARY
Ami = to hunt
Amini = hunter
Tlatquehua/ tlatquitlacatl = rich (person)
Pilhuilia = to increase
Pactia = to be pleasant (used with the object particles it means “to like”: nechpactia = I like it, or literally “it is pleasant to me”)
Tlacuatzin = opossum
Tepemaxtla/ Tlahcomiztli = cacomistle (a rare Mexican animal)
Epatl = skunk
Pitzotl = pig
Cuanacatl = hen
Cuacuahue = cow
Cuacuauhtentzone/ cuacuauhtentzotl = goat
Centzontli = mockingbird (the bird with the 400 voices)
Tepemiztli = bobcat
Cozamatl = weasel
Ocelotl = jaguar, ocelot
Aocmo = not anymore (also “not yet”, but “ayemo” is more often used for that)
Ayemo = not yet
Amo zanye/zaniyo = not only
Zazan = too much
(Za)zan nen = in vain
Possessive pronoun + Cel = alone (mocel = you alone, icel = he or she alone, etc.) The word “zan” is often used before saying this, to give it strength: zan nocel = only me, alone. It can be pluralized: zan toceltin = we alone
Possessive pronoun + Cepan = together (tocepan tiyazqueh = we are going together)
Ihuan = together (ihuan cateh = they are together)
Ayi = to do
Chihua = to make
Tlen tayi? / tlen ticchihua? = what are you doing?
Tlehca? / tlen inin? = why?
Tlen ipampa? = for what reason?
In tlen = what… (in tlen ticchihua, amo cualli = what you are doing is not good)

PHRASES
Amo yehuan, amoniquinixmati = It’s not them, I don’t know them
Amo zanye inin, noihqui inon = Not only this, but that as well
Amo zan icel iyaz = He won’t go alone
Amo ihuan ohualaqueh = They didn’t come together
Tlen ipampa tichoca, tinocneuh David? = Why (for what reason) are you crying, my friend David?
In tlen ticchihua, amo nechpactia = I don’t like what you are doing

Have fun, see you next time :D
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-06-16, 22:32

LESSON 17

Hi, welcome to Lesson number 17. In previous lessons, we learnt the irregular verb CA, which would be the equivalent to Spanish verb “estar”, in English it can be the verb “to be” but not always, because Nahuatl actually doesn’t have a verb “to be”. Let’s see the present, past and future tenses of this very irregular verb:

CA (Present tense)
Nica
Tica
Ca
Ticateh
Ancateh
Cateh

CA (Past tense)
Onicatca
Oticatca
Ocatca
Oticatcah
Oancatcah
Ocatcah

CA (Future tense)
Niyez
Tiyez
Yez
Tiyezqueh
Anyezqueh
Yezqueh

Yalhua onicatca ompa = I was there yesterday
Yez cenca quetzalli = It will be very beautiful
Campa ca in axixcalco? = where is the bathroom?

POSSESSION (Axcaitl)
In Lesson 6 we saw the possessive pronouns. Those are used to say: my, your, his/her/its, our, your (plural) and their. Well, if you add “axca” (or “huaxca” in some regions) to those possessive pronouns, you get the following:
Noaxca = mine
Moaxca = yours
Iaxca = his/hers
Toaxca = ours
Anmoaxca = yours (plural)
Inaxca = theirs

Inin noteconalli = this is my pencil
Inin teconalli noaxca = this pencil is mine

Very easy, isn’t it? :P

VOCABULARY
Miac/ miec = a lot
Miactin = lots of
Tepitzin/ tziquitzin = a bit
Quezquin/ quexqui = how many/much?
Ipati = to cost
Quexqui ipati? = how much does it cost?
Amitla = nothing
Achi = more
Achi cualli = better
Tetepitzin = less
Achtopan = first
Zatepan = then, later, after (that)
Nelli / Melahuac = true, truly
Neliliztli = truth
Noihqui = too, also, as well
Aic = never
Cuix / coch = is it that…? (Cuix ma omomiquili in motahtzin? = is it that your father died?)
Hueliz = perhaps, maybe

COUNTRIES, PEOPLE & LANGUAGES
We already know that Mexicatl means Mexican and Caxtiltecatl means Spaniard. Let’s see some other countries and the name for the people living there. Aztecs or Mexicas obviously didn’t know about France, Japan, etc., at least not before old Spaniards came to invade. Most of these names, if not all, were taken from Spanish in one way or another. There is more than one variant, and there is no official way to call all these countries, but little by little everything seems to be standardizing. I will give you the name of some countries, their inhabitants, and their languages. I compared 2 dictionaries, Wikipedia, and sometimes my teacher’s version. This is the result 8-) :

Mexihco = Mexico / Mexicatl = Mexican / Nahuatlahtolli = Nahuatl, Mayatlahtolli = Mayan, etc :P
Caxtillan = Spain / Caxtiltecatl = Spaniard / Caxtiltlahtolli = Spanish language
Inglatlalpan = England / Inglatlaltecatl = English (person) / Inglatlahtolli = English language
Teutontlan or Alemantlan = Germany / Teutontecatl or alemantecatl = German / Teutontlahtolli or Alemantlahtolli = German language
Francia = France / Francitecatl = French/ Francitlahtolli = French language
Portocallan = Portugal / Portocaltecatl = Portuguese / Portocaltlahtolli
Itallan = Italy / Italtecatl = Italian / Italtlahtolli = Italian language
Hollanda = Holland / Hollantecatl = Dutchman / Hollantlahtolli = Dutch
Helenoyan = Greece / Hellenotecatl = Greek / Helenotlahtolli = Greek language
Rusia or Rusitlalpan = Russia / Rusitlaltecatl = Russian / Rusitlahtolli = Russian language
Iran = Iran / Irantecatl = Iranian / Persiatlahtolli = Farsi
Exipto = Egypt / Exiptecatl = Egyptian / Arabitlahtolli = Arabic
India = India / Inditecatl = Indian / Inditlahtolli = Hindi (etc., I know :P)
Xapon = Japan / Xapotecatl = Japanese / Xapotlahtolli or Nipontlahtolli = Japanese language
Corea Huitztlampa = South Korea / Coreatecatl = Korean / Coreatlahtolli = Korean language
China = China / Chinatecatl = Chinese / Chinatlahtolli = Chinese language
Africa Huitztlampa = South Africa / Africa Huitztlampanecatl = South African / Africaantlahtolli = Afrikaans (etc.)
Arxentitlan = Argentina / Arxentitecatl = Argentinian
Canauhtlan = Canada / Canauhtecatl = Canadian
Brasillan = Brazil / Brasiltecatl = Brazilian
Irac = Iraq / Iractecatl = Iraqi
Corea Mictlampa = North Korea
Australlan = Australia / Australtecatl = Australian
Yancuic Zetlalpan = New Zealand / Yancuiczetlalpanecatl = New Zealander

How to say USA? There is an open discussion about this :P Aulex dictionary says “TICA”, which stands for Tlahtocayotl In Cepanca ihuicpa America (literal translation with the word America left as it is). It also says Yancuic Anglitlalpan (New England), which can be a bit confusing, because there is a region in the USA called that :P Finally, Wikipedia says Tlacetililli Tlahtocayotl Ixachitlan, which is, in my opinion, the most thorough translation so far, so that would be… TTI? :) In that case, “American (as in an American)” would be… “Tlacetililli Tlahtocayotl Ixachitecatl”, nice huh. Yancuic anglitlaltecatl would be easier... Ixachitlan means America as the American Continent, so maybe if we adapt the word and say “Americatecatl” people would understand that we mean people from the USA. Anyway, that’s all I can say about it for now, let’s see what happens.

Axcan chicome titotazqueh! :mrgreen:
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-06-17, 6:37

LET'S SEE A SMALL TEXT :D

First some vocabulary:
tamazolli = toad
azcatl = ant
tzicatl = ant (a special one, big and poisonous)
tlehco = to get up/on
olinia = to move
piloa = to hang (as a reflexive verb it means "to hold")
ihtoa = to say (as in "mihtoa" which we already saw)
mini = to sting/bite
tzicuini = to jump


Tamazolli ihuan in Tzicatl

Cente tamazolli ocochiya.
Ohualah cente tzicatl ihuan ipan otlehcoc.
In tamazolli omolinih ihuan in tzicatl omopiloh.
In tamazolli oquihto: "tlehca tinechmini?"
In tzicatl oquinanquilih: "nozo amo xitzicuini!"


The Toad and the Ant

A toad was sleeping.
An ant came and got on him.
The toad moved and the ant held on to him.
The toad said: "why do you bite me?"
The ant answered back: "don't jump then!"

:silly:
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby kalemiye » 2009-06-29, 19:27

Be politically correct :P

Mizton wrote:COUNTRIES, PEOPLE & LANGUAGES
We already know that Mexicatl means Mexican and Caxtiltecatl means Spaniard. Let’s see some other countries and the name for the people living there. Aztecs or Mexicas obviously didn’t know about France, Japan, etc., at least not before old Spaniards came to invade drop by to say hi.


:lol: jk

Jokes aside, this lesson about countries, people and languages was very interesting, I read it throughly. Thanks for posting!
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-07-04, 0:09

LESSON 18

Niltze! Welcome to Lesson number 18 :D . This time we are going to see the imperative form, how to express need and capacity, and a few phrases, but first some vocabulary.

VOCABULARY
Itechpa = about (talk about, think about, etc.)
Tzompilli / tzompilahui = a cold/ the flu
Tlamachtilcalli/tlamachtilcalco/tlamachtiloyan = school
Nahuatia = to let know, to notify
Techia = to wait for someone
Choloa = to flee, to escape
Ihiyotia / ihiyoana = to breath
Tahtaca = to scratch (becomes reflexive when the person scratches him/herself)
Papachoa = to pamper, to aid (this is where the Spanish verb apapachar comes from)
Iciuhcac = fast, quickly
Xinechtlapopolhui = I’m sorry, excuse me
Canah = somewhere, some place(s)
Canah quiahui canah amo quiahui = in some places it rains in some others it doesn’t
(Mo)teca = to lay down (reflexive)
Cuica = to sing
Mihtotia = to dance
(Mo)tlalia = to sit down (reflexive)
Yece / Auh = but
Mama = to carry
Coni = to drink
Tzahtzi / tzahtzilia = to shout, to scream
Tlahuelcui / cualania = to get mad, to get angry
Tilmatlahuatzaloni = towel
Tepoztlecuilli = stove
Nenemilia = to think
Nenemi = to walk
(Mo)centlalia = to meet, to gather (reflexive)
Namaca = to sell
Moquetza = to stand up
Tilana = to pull
Mayana = to be hungry
Polihui = to be missing
Amo tla = nothing (like “Amitla”, but this one is used more often with verbs: amo tla polihui – “nothing’s missing”).
Huetzca = to laugh
Zan quezqui = just a few
Mehua = to get up

NEED / HAVE TO & CAN / CAN’T
MONEQUI literally means “It is wanted (that)”, and that’s the verb we use to express a need. The verb next to it should be in the future tense. We will conjugate the verb that follows MONEQUI. Examples:
Monequi niyaz = I have to go
Monequi ticholoz = you have to escape
Monequi anquicuaz = you guys have to eat it
Amo monequi nitequitiz = I don’t have to work

HUEL / HUELI / HUELITI is the verb for “to be able to”. Its usage is similar to that of MONEQUI, but the second verb doesn’t have to be in the future tense. And the negative form can be AMO HUEL(I) or AHUEL. Examples:
Huel nicchihuaz = I’ll be able to do it
Ahuel nicochi = I can’t sleep

Note: HUEL can also mean “very”, as in “tlazohcamati huel miac” = thank you very much.

IMPERATIVE
In Nahuatl all 6 persons have an imperative form. For the first and third persons in both singular and plural (I, he, we, and they), we add the particle MA before the conjugation pronoun, some verbs lose their ending, and in the plural we add the suffix CAN. Examples (Tlayeyecolli):

I (For the first person, we can translate it as “let’s” or simply “do it!”, when you talk to yourself)
Ma nicochi = let’s sleep (Me and myself :P)
Ma nitequiti = let’s work
Ma ninalti = let’s take a bath
Ma nitenahuati = let’s notify...
Ma nitechia = let’s wait (for them, for people)
Ma ninocehui = let’s rest
Ma nicholo = let’s escape
Ma nihiyoti = let’s breath

HE / SHE (for the third person, we can translate it as “may he/she…”)
Ma tlacua = may he eat
Ma moteca = may he lay down
Ma momachti = may he study
Ma cuica = may he sing
Ma mihtoti = may he dance
Ma motlali = may he sit

WE (For the first person in plural, we can translate it as “let’s”)
Ma titlacuacan = let’s eat
Ma tihuiyacan = let’s go (irregular)
Ma titlamamacan = let’s carry
Ma ticonican = let’s drink

THEY (For the thrid person in plural, we can translate it as “may they…”)
Ma tepahtican = may they heal (people)
Ma tzahtzican = may they scream

For the second person in both singular and plural, we are going to add a “XI” prefix to the verb, while the conjugation pronoun disappears. The plural still has the “CAN” suffix. Examples:

YOU (singular)
Xitlachia = look!
Xicpohua = count it!
Xitlacuilo = write!
Xiccaqui = listen to it!
Xinechmaca = give me!

YOU (plural)
Ximocentlalican = get together!, gather!
Ximoquetzacan = stand up!
Ximotilanacan = pull!

Now, there are two suffixes that we can use in the imperative form to indicate direction: TI and QUI. The TI suffix means “go to”, and the suffix QUI means “come to”.
Examples:
Xitlacuati = go eat something!
Xitlacuaqui = come to eat something!
Xicochiti = go to sleep!
Xicochiqui = come to sleep!
Xitequititi = go to work!

PHRASES
Ichpocatl, ticmati nahuatlahtolli? = Young man, do you know Nahuatl?
Quema, zan tepitzin = Yes, a little bit
Amo huel cualli = Not very good
Cualli nictencaqui, yece ahueli nictenehua = I understand well, but I can’t pronounce it
Cualli nicamapohua = I read it well
Zan quezqui tlahtoltin nicmati = I only know a few words
Amo nictencaqui = I don’t understand it
Amo tla nicmati = I don’t know anything
Monequi ninomachtiz = I have to study
Ahueli nictenehua, ohuitic = I can’t pronounce it, it’s hard
Tlen otiquihto? = What did you say?
Tinechtencaqui? = Do you understand me?
Quema, nochi nictencaqui = Yes, I understand it all
Tehuatl titlahtoa iciuhca = You speak fast
Yolic xitlahto, nimitztlatlauhtia = Speak slowly, I beg you
Xinechtlapopolhui, amo nitencaqui = Excuse me, I don’t understand you
Quen tica Xochitl? = How are you, Xochitl?
Cualli, tlazohcamati = I’m doing well, thank you
Campa tiyauh? = Where are you going?
Niyauh ichan María = I’m going to Maria’s house (I’m going to her house María)
Axcan chicome tiyaz Chiconcuac? = Are you going to Chiconcuac next week?
Amo, nehuatl niyaz Xochimilco = No, I’ll go to Xochimilco

That’s all for today, see you next time!! 8-)
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Sarabi » 2009-07-30, 20:12

Niltze. Notoca Sarabi. Quen motoca?
Niquitlazotla moyome!!!
Monequi niyaz. Ixquichca moztla.
English (native); français (semi-fluent); español (basic conversational, 3 years in school + completed Duolingo tree); română (studied for a year + Duolingo Level 7); italiano (beginner; Duolingo tree completed); Deutsch (Duolingo Level 11, but I have a poor grasp of this language)

Official Dabbling History: 1.5 semesters in college nihongo; 2 semesters in college Kiswahili; 3 college linguistics classes

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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-07-31, 2:36

Niltze Sarabi :) Ximopanolti in nahuatlahtol-machtiliztli! Tihuitz Yancuic Anglitlalpan, amo? Cualli, notoca Fernando, nicempaqui nimitzixmati :) Ihuan noihqui nicempaqui ipampa nican otitlacuilo nahuatlahtolpa. Tlazohcamati, titotazqueh!
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-08-12, 20:59

LESSON 19

Hi people, welcome to lesson number 19 8-) . This time we will see some more vocabulary, the words to express “with (someone)”, the most common suffixes for place names, and a few phrases and conversations.

VOCABULARY
Zazanilli = tale, story
Tlanmetl/ tlancochtli = molar, back tooth
Teyollopahtiani = cardiologist
Tlacayomatini/ tenemilizmatini = anthropologist
Pahnamacani = pharmacist
Tlapalteconalli = crayon
Tlazohtzin = girlfriend/ boyfriend/ lover (literally “little love”)
Huipanatlahtolli = phrase
Momoztla = every day, daily
Xi(nech)chia tepitzin = wait (me for) a second
Ma cualli ohtli = good luck, have a nice day/time/trip (lit. “May (you have) a good path”)
Tepacholiztli = government
Hueyi tlamachtiloyan = university
Momachtiani = student
Amoxpohualiztli = reading
In aquin = the one who…
In campa = where…
Pilli = kid, son, daughter, child
Namictli = husband
Teyaochihuani / yaochiuhqui = soldier
Paccanemi = to live happy
Icihui = to hurry up (reflexive)

WITH
A word that is generally equivalent to English “with”, would be “ica”, as in “Ica paquiliztli” (with pleasure). But when we talk about people we don’t usually say “ica”. For this we are going to use the word TLOC (TLOCTZINCO in its reverential form). Sometimes it can also be understood as “next to” or “near”. To use it, we have to add the possessive pronouns are prefixes:

Notloc = with me/ next to me/ near me
Motloc = with you/ next to you/ near you
Itloc = with him, her, it/ next to him, her, it/ near him, her, it
Totloc = with us / next to us/ near us
Anmotloc = with you (plural)/ next to you (plural)/ near you (plural)
Intloc = with them/ next to them/ near them
Here we have some examples:
Aquin mocehuitica itloc Miguel? = Who is sitting with/next to Miguel? (Lit. “with him, Miguel”)
Timihtotiznequi notloc? = Do you want to dance with me?

CONVERSATIONS
Tlen, Aurora in aquin tlahtoa itloc tepahtiani? = What, is it Aurora who’s talking with the doctor?
Melahuac, yehuatl tlahtotica itloc teyollopahtiani = It’s true (right), she is talking with the cardiologist.
Aurora momachtia in hueyi tlamachtiloyan? = Does Aurora study at the university?
Amo, yehuatl temachtiani, tequiti in Amatlan, ihuan no(ihqui) ompa chanti. = No, she is a teacher, she works in Amatlan, and she also lives there.

Tiquixmati Amatlan? = Do you know Amatlan?
Amatlan, in campa chanti Aurora, cencualtzin = Amatlan is where Aurora lives, it’s very beautiful.
Yehuatl paccanemi intloc impilhuan (in-pilhuan) ihuan inamic. = She lives happily with her kids and her husband.
Inamic itoca David. David yaochiuhqui. = Her husband’s name is David. David is a soldier.
Quimpiah yei ipilhuan. Intelpoch Andrés tequiti in amatitlaloyan, Memo temachtiani, ihuan Citlalli tequiti ompa cocoxcacalco. = They have three children. Their son ( young guy) Andrés works at the post office, Memo is a teacher, and Citlalli works in the hospital.

Well that’s it for now, see you next time! :D
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Mizton
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-10-20, 21:04

LESSON 20

Hello there :) Long time no see. I suddenly decided to add a new lesson here about the human body, yeah vocabulary. So, here it is:

Nacayotl = body
Cuaitl / tzontecomatl = head
Cuayollotl = brain
Ixtli = face
Quechtli = neck
Acolli = shoulder
Matzopaztli = arm
Molictli / matepopolli = elbow
Maquechtli = wrist
Mahpalli = palm
Mahpilli = finger
Iztitl = fingernail
Yelpantli = chest
Omicicuilli / cecehcuilli = rib
Cuitlapantli = back
Cuitlapanxilotl = column
Pitzahuayan = waist
Chichihualli = breast
Chichihualyacatl = nipple
Chichihualayotl = milk
Tzontli = hair
Nacaztli = ear
Ixcuaitl = forhead
Ixtzontli = eyelash
Ixtelohtli / ixtelolohtli = eye
Ixayotl = tear
Yacatl = nose
Ixteliuhcatl = cheek
Tentli = lip
Camactli = mouth
Tlantli = tooth
Tlancochtli = back tooth, molar
Nenepilli = tongue
Camachalli / tenchalli = chin
Tozcatecuacuilli = uvula
Maitl = hand
Ihtitl = belly
Tzintli = butt
Tzintamalli = buttcheek
Tepolli = penis
Ahuacatl = testicle
Xipintli = foreskin
Tepulayotl = semen
Tepolcuaxipeuhcatl = glans
Tepilli = vagina
Tepiltenxipalli = vulval lip
Tepilcuaxicalli = uterus, womb
Maxatli = thigh
Metztli = leg
Tlancuaitl / tetepontli = knee
Coztli = calf
Icxitl = foot
Xopilli = toe
Xocpalli = sole

Titohtazqueh! :wink:
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2009-11-18, 0:44

Long time no see Mizton! :D

How's the Nahuatl course going for you? I think I have to learn Nahuatl some day, it's just so cool, and I can't seem to get away from it. 8-) :lol:

If you ever have any more lessons to post, they would be greatly appreciated, since there isn,t a whole lot on Nahuatl in English. :yep:


Oh, did you ever find any online texts in Nahuatl? If not, do you know of a website I could order books written in Nahuatl? Preferably the classical orthography, since it looks much more aesthetically pleasing to me. What the texts or books are about doesn't matter much though.
Main focuses: [flag]kw[/flag] [flag]he[/flag]
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On my own: [flag]is[/flag]

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Mizton
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2009-12-01, 3:28

Hello Sean, well it's just that right now i'm focusing on one single modern variant, the one from Milpa Alta (still the Federal District), and I just stoped uploading lessons.... I am preparing a major Nahuatl project for the internet, but I'll realease it next summer.
There are some amazing news :) Like... Firefox is being translated into Nahuatl :P they already released a Mayan and a Zapotec version.
I haven't found lots of texts in Nahuatl online... the ones I have are in books... hm, have you tried http://mexica.ohui.net/ ? they have some texts there.
I'm writing my blog in Nahuatl again :P if you wanna visit http://miztonpixan.blogspot.com/
Altho i'm not a native speaker....
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby othomas » 2010-02-23, 4:23

I just found you and now it looks like it is necessary to apply myself. I have dabbled for years and scanned your lessons up to here. I have an English speaking Mexican friend in DF who has adopted me as his abuelo. I used one of my many dictionaries and located colli as grandfather so I have been signing my e-mail as colli.

Then I read a post about the derivation of name colima for a town in Mexico. It says the name comes from Nahuatl colli maitl and means conquered by the hands of grandfather. I started to sign as colli matl but did not really mean 'conquered by hands of grandfather

Now I think this lesson teaches that I can sign as "Nomatl colli" meaning hand of grandfather or meaning by the hand of grandfather. This is another example of word order,

Does "Nomatl colli" seem correct as a signature?

Tlazocamati :hmm:

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Mizton
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2010-02-23, 4:38

Ok, this is a very good question. I personally think that the best option would be "Nomah nicolli", literally "my hand, I the grandfather". Maitl loses the ending when used with a possessive pronoun, and "colli" all alone would really mean "he-(is)-the-grandfather". So that would be my option: Nomah nicolli. If there's any native speaker here who doesn't agree, please let me know.
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

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Mizton
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby Mizton » 2010-05-30, 19:05

HELLO, HOW ARE YOU GUYS? I JUST UPLOADED A NEW FILE CALLED "NÁHUATL HISPANOHABLANTES". A WORD DOCUMENT CONTAINING THIS SAME COURSE, BUT MORE CONCISE AND EXTENDED (THERE ARE MORE LESSONS IN THE SPANISH, ORIGINAL VERSION), AND SOME MISTAKES HAVE BEEN CORRECTED. ENJOY, ALL OF YOU WHO SPEAK SPANISH. :D

HOLA, CÓMO ESTÁN TODOS? ACABO DE SUBIR UN NUEVO ARCHIVO LLAMADO "NÁHUATL HISPANOHABLANTES". UN DOCUMENTO DE WORD QUE CONTIENE ESTE MISMO CURSO, PERO MÁS CONCISO Y AUMENTADO (HAY MÁS LECCIONES EN LA VERSIÓN ORIGINAL EN ESPAÑOL), Y ALGUNOS ERRORES ESTÁN CORREGIDOS. DISFRUTEN, TODOS LOS QUE HABLAN ESPAÑOL. :D

NILTZE, QUEN TIYETICATEH? YE ONICOMAN YANCUIC TOAMAUH ITOCA "NÁHUATL HISPANOHABLANTES". CE TOAMAUH PAN WORD IN TLEIN QUIPIA INON TONAHUAMATILIZ, YECE OC ACHI MELAHUAC HUAN OC ACHI HUEYI (IPAN NELHUAYOAMATL CAXTILTLAHTOLPA TICPIAH OC ACHI MACHIOME), HUAN TEPITZIN ONICPAPATI. XICMOCUILTONOCAN, ANNICNIHUAN IN AQUIN ANTLAHTOAH CAXTILTLAHTOLPA. 8-)

DOWNLOAD / DESCARGA / TLATEMOHUILIZTLI
http://www.mediafire.com/?wznymwz2kjm
Tlazohtlaliztli tlacuiloa ica miac tlapalli

holabitubbe
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Re: ***NAHUATL COURSE***

Postby holabitubbe » 2010-07-04, 3:09

Cualli tonalli!

I am working on learning some Nahuatl, and I am wondering if you can help me with the Nahuatl for these words: hair barrette, dance regalia, pants, pottery, and ring (jewelry).

Tlazohcamati


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