Tupi (Tupinambá) Lessons

Kunio
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Postby Kunio » 2003-12-07, 23:43

Eu estou gostando desse curso, mas tá realmente um pouco complicado :lol: mas assim que é legal!

Olha que engraçado, só tem brasileiros nesse tópico, por que será? :o

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jururu
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Postby jururu » 2003-12-07, 23:54

How do I say JURURU in Tupi?
:wink:

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2005-01-11, 11:24

Hey, Thi, never felt like continuing the Tupi lessons? If you're still up for it, it'd be fun to keep following the thread. :)
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Postby E}{pugnator » 2005-01-11, 18:57

Pitts, I was told the book you learn Tupi from is currently out of print :( . Do you know when a new edition will be released?
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Postby bluechiron » 2005-04-13, 1:30

More lessons! Please!! :)

This is an awesome course, not only because it is easy to follow, but because there is so little information on Tupi.

Did you know that Tupi-Guarani is no longer taught in the US? About five years ago it was taught, and then stopped. To my knowledge, there are no longer any courses whatsoever!
Shukta shimi yuyankapak, kanpa ñawikunata wichkana ushankakunarakmi kanpa shungutawan uyankirakpish.
To know another language, first your eyes will have to be open, and you will have to listen with your heart.

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Postby Pittsboy » 2005-04-27, 17:41

E}{pugnator wrote:Pitts, I was told the book you learn Tupi from is currently out of print :( . Do you know when a new edition will be released?


Ages later LOL: yeah, the author asked the publisher to stop printing the book because he says they are too expensive. So, out of print for good.
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Pittsboy
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Postby Pittsboy » 2005-04-27, 17:43

bluechiron1 wrote:More lessons! Please!! :)

This is an awesome course, not only because it is easy to follow, but because there is so little information on Tupi.

Did you know that Tupi-Guarani is no longer taught in the US? About five years ago it was taught, and then stopped. To my knowledge, there are no longer any courses whatsoever!


I unfortunaly haven't gt the time to do so anymore :-( working too much and there is college yet... I will try it some time...
"It is no good to try to stop knowledge from going forward. Ignorance is never better than knowledge."

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Postby Guest » 2005-06-12, 23:12

Pittsboy wrote:but I think you are the only on here interested in Tupi :(

I think you'll be satisfied to know it's not true... I really want to learn Tupi, and your lessons are very good... the problem is that I don't know of any good Tupi dictionaries online. I mean, dictionaries with a big number of words... can you or anyone else recommend me one?

best regards...

Guest

Postby Guest » 2005-06-13, 0:22

alô,

aqui seguem as regras pra junção de palavras em Tupi:

1 - se uma palavra é oxítona, a mesma não muda
ex: abá + catu = abacatu
tatu + catu = tatucatu
2 - se a palavra paroxítona antes de vogal perde a última vogal; antes de consoante ou semivogal, perde a última sílaba:
ex: taba (aldeia) + ybaté (alto (a)) = tab'ybaté.
ybaca (céu) + pirang (vermelho) = ybapiranga
nos paroxítonos de 2 sílabas, é rara a perda de sílabas.

o som de "c", depois de som nasal, fica nasalizado (g). exemplo: nheeng (língua) + catu (bom) = nheengatu (língua boa)

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Postby toksave » 2005-10-31, 4:58

hey pits, i just want to know if tupi is a native brazilian language? maybe i didn't catch where it is spoken.

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Postby Guillem » 2005-11-24, 23:55

toksave wrote:hey pits, i just want to know if tupi is a native brazilian language? maybe i didn't catch where it is spoken.

Yes, that's it. Tupinambá is an extinct language nowadays (I think :? ), but it used to be spoken by the peoples who lived along the coast of Brazil. It is apparently one of the many Tupi languages, which are part of the larger Tupi-Guarani family.

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Postby Pittsboy » 2005-11-28, 20:32

Next semester I will retake my Tupi studies in college so I will be able to resume this Tupi course here at Unilang. Also, I need to reassume my position as moderator some time soon.

:)
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Postby Senyani » 2007-01-26, 21:26

This is a cool language! I've never heard it before. I would assume that it's spoken in Brazil?
Se inelos tarvi keuma se ilé doma kavu.

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AlexandreMsx
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Postby AlexandreMsx » 2007-08-15, 0:56

Not anymore, it was until the 18 century when it was forbiden.

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Osias
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Postby Osias » 2007-09-23, 16:31

But there are still words from it, here and there in modern Brazilian Portuguese. Maybe somewhere on web there's a list.


I would like to learn it too, but I'm already trying to get some Hindi these days... :(
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Re: Tupi (Tupinambá) Lessons

Postby Psi-Lord » 2013-10-15, 2:39

After so many years, I finally got a (printed) copy of Curso de Tupi Antigo! :D If only I had enough free time to devour it…
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Re: Tupi (Tupinambá) Lessons

Postby daphnis » 2015-07-14, 4:14

There is actually around 30 thousand tupi speakers in north Brazil, in a city called "São Gabriel da Cachoeira", where it's an official language. There is also thousands of tupi-guarani languages speakers among native brazillians in all regions.
The largest spoken representant of the language is Paraguayan Guarani, spoken by around 8 million people.

Tupi was the language of the shore of south america around 1500, guarani was it's version spoken far from the shore.
Tupi became the main language of Portuguese invasion during the first 250 years, in order that people that were part of it (weather amerindian, portuguese, african, chinese, etc) propagated the tupi/guarani languages around the continent.

There were also, of course, thousands of amerindian languages(from which around only 150 survived to nowadays) not related to tupi/guarani on middle lands of Brazil (and possibly also on the shore...), in order that we can consider that Tupi/Guarani was the most propagated language of Portuguese slowly growing imperialism, more than portuguese. This until around 1760, when Tupi was officially forbidden and it's use punished severely.
From all sources I read, it's quite uncertain the level on which Tupi/Guarani kept being spoken by brazillian society after the prohibition, althought it's reasonable to suppose that there were large amount of speakers on the beggining 1900's and it's still uncertain which language the majority of Brazillian society spoke at around 1850.

The Tupi of the shore was transformed in a "lingua franca" sometimes called as "Lingua Geral", it seems that this "Lingua Geral" that was widely spoken around Portuguese settlements and it's still alive at São Gabriel da Cachoeira, being called nowadays Nheengatu.

Guarani and Tupi, at my perception, are very close languages, that could perhaps be called dialects. I studied mostly the Old Tupi and the Paraguayan Guarani, and they seem to me very close to each other (even having such geographical and chronological distance). They seem to me closer to each other than Spanish and Portuguese, for an example.
This way, weather a person studies Old Tupi, Nheengatu, Paraguayan Guarani, Guarani mbia, this person will be evolving in the understanding of all of them. (I can't say about other dialects but I suppose they are also close...)

There is a site called uz-translations.net where a person can find many legal methods on studying those languages, like the Montoya "Arte de la lengua guarani" and many others that are free of authors rights.

A good book I recomind to study paraguayan guarani is of "Antonio Guasch" "El Idioma Guarani", which can be found at Amazon and in other sites - this book comes with a small, but interesting selection of bilingual literature at the end.

The question is that with the absolutely lack of materials, books, bilingual editions about Tupi/Guarani languages, at least in Brazil, it seems nowadays necessary to mix the study of dialects, this way it's more possible to find a minimum of study material available. In my case I'm interested in all dialects, but even if a person is specially interested in one, using materials from others will help.


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