Cusco Quechua

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Rikita
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Postby Rikita » 2006-10-11, 20:22

Sorry I take so long to post a new lesson... Will try to post one now...

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Postby Rikita » 2006-10-11, 22:30

Kinsa Neqen Yachay

A. Rimakuy: ¿Imaynallan taytayki?

Pedro: ¿Imaynallan taytayki?
Jorge: Payqa allillanmi.
Pedro: ¿Mamaykiri?
Jorge: Manan allinchu unqushanmi.

B. Musuq simikuna

mana - no
ama - no! (used for example in imperative forms)
arí - yes

unqu - sickness, illness
unquy - to get sick

qhari - man
kaka - uncle (mother's brother)
yaya - uncle (father's brother)
ipa - aunt
mulla - niece, nephew
apuski, apucha - grandfather
hatucha - grandmother
awkilla - great grandmother
awkillu - great grandfather
haway, willka - grandchild
anpullu - great grandchild
chupullu - great great grandchild

C. Yupaykuna (Numbers):

1 huk
2 iskay
3 kinsa
4 tawa
5 pisqa
6 suqta
7 qanchis
8 pusaq
9 isqun
10 chunka

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Postby Karavinka » 2006-10-12, 14:38

Rikita wrote:Sorry I take so long to post a new lesson... Will try to post one now...


It's okay ;) It gives me the time to let the materials sink in... if you posted lessons everyday it'd just overwhelm everyone.

I'm glad to see the next one up. I'll start working on it on friday when my midterm exams are over..
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Postby Rikita » 2006-10-16, 23:38

hi, sorry... the lesson above is not complete yet (though of course you can still start working on it already)... so far i only copied part of the book, and didn't add anything myself yet - the thing is, i started having computer trouble the other day, so i posted before i would lose what i had already written... i will write the rest as soon as i can...

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Postby Rikita » 2006-11-02, 16:03

Uh-oh... it is later than I had intended again, so not much time... At least one little exercise though:

Answer:

Allillanchu?
Imaynallan warmiyki/qusayki?
Imaynallan wayqeyki/turayki?
Panaykiri/ñañaykiri?
Taytaykiri/mamaykiri?
Kakayki unqushanchu?
Ipaykiri?

Ask questions for the answers:
...? - Apuchayqa allillanmi.
...? - Hatuchayqapas allillanmi.
...? - Arí, mullaqa unqushanmi.
...? - Willkaqa manan allillanchu.
...? - Awkilla allillanmi kashan.

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Postby Rikita » 2006-11-18, 18:46

I noticed, that in the book I use, they introduce the verb "kay" very late. I think I will already introduce it here, and with it the verb conjugation:

KAY - to be

nuqa kani
qan kanki
pay kan
nuqanchis kanchis
nuqayku kayku
qankuna kankichis
paykuna kanku

The ending for the infinitive form is -y. The endings for the conjugation of indicative present are:
singular:
1. person -ni
2. person -nki
3. person -n
plural:
1. p. incl -nchis
1. p. excl -yku
2. person -nkichis
3. person -nku

As you can see, the suffixes for third person singluar and first and third person plural are the same as for the possessive forms.

Instead of saying "Sutiyqa Rikita" I could now also say "Rikita kani" - I am Rikita.

As an exercise, you can try to form some very simple sentences with the nouns you learned in the lessons before. You could combine it also with the possessives, that you have already learned - for example: Mamayki kani. Waway kanki.

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Postby neo » 2007-02-13, 23:53

Hallo! I found an answer to one of your doubts Rikita, 'Ñawinchay' means 'to read'.

I have a little dictionary-program I found, and if you want it just sent me a message and an email address.(if you want)

Ciao.
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Postby Rikita » 2007-02-18, 0:59

cool, thanks!

oh, and i will try to post more here soon... life's busy... but i will try to make time...

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Postby Aleco » 2008-06-25, 10:17

Could "Qitcho" or something be another dialect form of it? A classmate's family all speak what they call "Qitcho" or something spoken in Ecuador or around there. They're missionaries and lived in Ecuador for 20 years so they learned "Qitcho". :) So is it the same language?
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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby Hildibrandr » 2010-01-31, 0:35

I'm Danish, and in Spanish class we're taught to 'blow' less when pronouncing P, T and C/QU, so that it sounds more like our B, D and G.

So I was thinking.. Are Quechua P, T and K roughly equal to Germanic B, D and G?
- And Quechua PH, TH and KH ≈ Germanic P, T and K?

I really hope that someone here can tell me.
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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2010-01-31, 0:43

The unaspirated P, T, and K do sound a lot like their voiced equivalents (at least to speakers of Germanic languages), and PH, TH, and KH are the same; that is, they are aspirated.
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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby Hildibrandr » 2010-01-31, 12:16

Thanks, Sean of the Dead :)
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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby hugomuriel » 2010-05-05, 18:49

The phrase "Mana imamantapas - You are welcome" should be written "Mana imamantapis" as it expresses implication. You could use the phrase "Imamantari ?" too, it should be pronounced with question stress which means "and for what? It's nothing..".

Sumaj wallej kai forunga! (very good this forum = this forum is very good)

By the way, the Quechua I speak it's from Cochabamba (the valley) in Bolivia.

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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby vijayjohn » 2013-12-06, 2:04

3+-year bump! (Wow, I just realized I'm going to end up using the word "bump" a lot on this forum. :lol:).

I'm interested in learning Cusco Quechua right now. It's cold here, just like it is in Cusco like year-round, apparently. :) I only know a few words at this point, but I know Spanish, and hopefully, I can learn some more (of the grammar at least) by learning some of the features of Andean Spanish and Media Lengua. Maybe I'll even learn about some of the variation within the Quechuan family that way. :P

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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby vijayjohn » 2013-12-07, 18:55

Rikita wrote:Q', Q, QH - a bit like German ch in Ach, but pronounced further back in the throat

Also, it's a stop, not a fricative (except syllable-finally).

imaynallan? - how are you?
imaynallan kashanki? - how are you?

You don't explain what kashanki means here, so I'm going to try to do that.

Kay means 'to be', so that's what the "ka" at the beginning of that word is. The -sha suffix indicates that the verb is in progressive aspect, and -ki indicates that the subject is 2SG ('you'). So, literally, it means 'you are being'.

allillan - exactly good, just good, just fine

Also allilla, I'm pretty sure. In allillanchu and allillanmi, the -n is a euphonic particle. (Of course, it has other functions in other contexts, but in these two words, I don't think it has any important function).

In fact, I never heard anyone at all say any equivalent for Hello in Quechua. If at all, the Spanish forms "Buenos dias", "Buenas tardes" seemed to be used.

What about "hola"?

What seemed more common was greeting someone with how are you - even those taht speak Spanish in that reagion seemed to greet more often by saying "Como estas".

When that happened, did people also respond in Spanish ("bien")? Or did they say "allillanmi" or something?

-qa is a topic marker

I think that corresponds to -ga in Ecuador (I think the specific variety I'm thinking of is Imbabura Quichua).

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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby vijayjohn » 2013-12-12, 6:01

Explanations (and breakdowns) of certain phrases:

Rikita wrote:Ama hinachu kaychis - please

"Ama" is a negative imperative particle ('don't!'). "Hina" means that, and "-chu" is a negative suffix, I think. "Ka" again is 'be', -y is an imperative suffix, and -chis I think indicates that the subject of a verb is 1/2PL (that is, first or second person plural).

Imamanta - You are welcome
Mana imamantapas - You are welcome

Ima = thing
Ima-manta = thing-from
Mana ima-manta-pas = not thing-from-any

Now, I'm trying to go through these titles: wiraqucha (mister), quya (missus), wayna (boy), and sipas (girl). I can remember wiraqucha because I think it's actually from the name of the Quechua deity, sometimes Romanized as Viracocha. I can only barely remember wayna, though (because it looks like wawa), and I'm trying to figure out how to remember quya and sipas. :hmm: Maybe I'll try looking for linguistics papers or something that have the words "quya," "wayna," and "sipas" in them. :P

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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby vijayjohn » 2013-12-16, 20:24

OK, so it turns out that I managed to memorize "wiraqucha," "quya," "wayna," and "sipas" anyway. :P (I had some dumb mnemonics for "quya" and "sipas" - like "quya" are the people who make khoya, which is the base for a lot of North Indian sweets I think, and...I don't even remember what I did for "sipas" :P).

-manta exists in Media Lengua, but I can't find any evidence that -pas does, speaking of which:

Rikita wrote:More suffixes already used in the text, that aren't in the grammar section of Mejía Huamán's book yet, though, are -pas (a variation is -pis), meaning "also, too, as well"

-pas/-pis can also mean 'and' and 'any'. (It might mean some other things, too, but I haven't really checked yet).

Sayariychis - stand up
Tiyaychis - sit down

Uyariychis - Attention, listen
Qhepayta rimaychis - repeat after me
Yachapayawaychis - repeat



None of these words seem to exist in Media Lengua, with the interesting exception of "rima," which I think means 'to say'. I've found "rimay" and other forms of that verb in Marco Shappeck's paper on Media Lengua (which you should be able to find online just by searching for "Shappeck Media Lengua" or something without quotes, if you're interested).

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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby vijayjohn » 2013-12-24, 0:53

Now I think I just need to learn these verbs (which I also mentioned in the previous post):

Sayariychis - stand up
Tiyaychis - sit down

Uyariychis - Attention, listen
Qhepayta rimaychis - repeat after me
Yachapayawaychis - repeat


OK, I think I've memorized most of them now (several hours after I started this post), except the last one, which can definitely be morphologically analyzed (and I'd like to also see whether any of these morphemes exist in what I can find on Media Lengua) as follows:

yacha-paya-wa-y-chis

Yacha means 'know', I think (Aymara has it, too). -paya is a suffix that means 'often' or (as in this case) 'repeatedly'. -wa means 'to me', and -y is the plural imperative suffix (i.e. the suffix you use for addressing more than one person. I mentioned earlier that it was an imperative suffix and that -chis is used when the subject is first/second person plural).

Also, here's my favorite video so far in (standardized, not very natural-sounding) Cuzco Quechua (I say it doesn't sound very "natural" because probably most people wouldn't talk this way. For example, the very first word is "imaynallan," which, as Rikita pointed out, is not very commonly used by actual Quechua-speakers):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzBGkrYR97I

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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby księżycowy » 2013-12-24, 11:11

I just got Kawsay Vida! While it teaches mostly Bolivian Quechua, it teaches some Cuzco Quechua too. Between this and your posts Vijay, your making me want to do some Quechua. :P Maybe soon.

Cuzco Quechua has to be my favorite dialect. Though learning some Bolivian won't hurt either.
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Re: Cusco Quechua

Postby vijayjohn » 2013-12-25, 6:35

Ooh, yay! Then maybe I'll have a study buddy for this language :mrgreen: Well, hey, even that possibility is more than I was hoping for! I guess it's my Christmas present. :lol:

I think I'm pretty interested in learning about the dialect differences in general (although so far, the only differences I'm aware of are some phonological differences and a few syntactic constructions that are apparently unique to Ecuadorian Quechua). But yeah, I like to try to learn the Cuzco variety mostly just because it's the one I managed to find online resources for most easily. :P


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