NAILC 2011 Archive

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Massimiliano B
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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby Massimiliano B » 2011-11-08, 22:20

księżycowy wrote:
Struthiomimus wrote:Aye, and I have Atanarjuat as well for Inuktitut.

I ought to get Atanarjuat.

If only someone would make movies with a lot of Quechua and Warlpiri dialogue in them (Just putting it out there, in case you're listening, Universe). :partyhat:

Or Mohawk, Lushootseed, Cree, Arrernte, and I could go on. :P



Whether one is a religious person or not, I think this site is very good, because you can see a movie in many languages. Choose a language in 'search languages starting with'. :)

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księżycowy
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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-08, 22:44

Darn! They only have it in Cree (at least out of the NAIL languages I'm interested in most). :(

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Remis
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Re: NAILC 2011 - Remis - [CHR]

Postby Remis » 2011-11-09, 10:25

Hey guys, sorry for not responding. :oops: Though I've been posting in other forums, school has ensured that I don't have much time to work on Cherokee (nor Italian and Arabic, which are supposed to be my main foci :?). Basically, the only language time I've had has been used for the Italian "the person below me" game and some light dabbling in Finnish. I've also gained a wanderlust for Mayan, which ain't good. I'm going to proceed with Cherokee, though, because you know, it's an actual NAIL and all. Also it's still awesome.
Anyway, the school workload seems to be lessening, so I'll hopefully start posting actual logs soon. :D

@księżycowy: Thanks a lot! That's an awesome website, even for other languages than Cherokee. I'm gonna have fun downloading IMEs from that, for sure. S'gi :P

@Mol_Bolom: That would be awesome! :D
Remis Kalvan | art / ˈfɛɪsˌbʊk | L1: [flag]no-nb[/flag] L2: [flag]en[/flag] reading short stories in: [flag]it[/flag] [flag]es[/flag]

TAC 2012 [flag]ja[/flag] [flag]la[/flag] ([flag]es-mx[/flag] [flag]non[/flag])
Of immense interest: [flag]grc[/flag] [flag]akk[/flag] [flag]egy[/flag] [flag]ar[/flag] [flag]mt[/flag] [flag]ga[/flag] [flag]eu[/flag] [flag]pl[/flag] [flag]prg[/flag] [flag]nah[/flag] [flag]qu[/flag] [flag]nv[/flag] [flag]zh.Hant[/flag]
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księżycowy
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Re: NAILC 2011 - Remis - [CHR]

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-09, 10:41

Not a problem! :wink:

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Re: księży - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-09, 20:36

Another update:

Enclitics:
Enclitics will be the focus of my post here. These are (what I would call) particles that add meaning to sentences. There are a lot of enclitics, and some even vary based upon who's speaking (male or female).

Here are the enclitics I've learned thus far:
he - we looked at this enclitic in one of my earlier posts. It turns a sentence into a question.

yeló, kištó - an turns the sentence into an assertion. Yeló = men, kištó = women
Yeló changes to weló when the preceding word ends in a u/uƞ. Kištó is usually shortened to kštó.

yo, ye -turns the sentence into a command. Yo men, ye women. And again, yo turns into wo after a u/uƞ. Ye also changes into we after u/uƞ.

šni - turns a sentence into it's negative equivalent.

ktA - Indicates the action in the sentence is only potential/hypothetical. This (in some cases, but not all) is equivalent to the English future tense.

A lot of enclitics can be used together in a sentence. It's only when they go in the same place in the sentence (as enclitics have fixed locations) or have opposing functions.

The order of the enclitics:
first ----> end of sentence
ktAšniyo, ye, yeló, kištó, he

So, you can use ktA, šni, and he, for example, in a sentence. But you can't use ye and he in the same sentence.

So, let's put these into some sentences to help understand this all better.
(All examples will use the male forms of the enclitics. The female form can be swapped for the male form if a female is speaking)

Mní latké he. - Are you drinking water?
Mní latké kte. - Your will/may drink water. (Your drinking of water has potential)
Mní latké yo. - (You) Drink the water!
Mní latké šni. - You're not drinking water.
Mní latké yeló. - You are drinking water. (an assertion)

Mní latké šni yo. - (You) Don't drink water!
Mní latké kta he. - Will you drink water? (Do you have the potential to drink water?)
etc.

A Words:
One last point for today. You may notice that some Lakhota words around here are spelled with a capital 'a.' This is to show that this final 'a' is subject to change under the right conditions.
Here are the conditions:
(-> = changes to)

a -> e
- when the word is last in the sentence
-followed by kištó, šni, yeló and a few other enclitics covered later in the textbook

a -> iƞ
-followed by ktA and another enclitic covered later

a -> a (no change)
-if followed by most enclitics

Hence the changes in ktA seen in the sentences I just presented.

Until next time! :wink:

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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-10, 2:30

I did a lot today. I reviewed verbs of motion, active verbs, and the days of the week.

Days of the Week:

Monday - Aŋpétu Tȟokáhe/Aŋpétu Tȟokáheya
Tuesday - Aŋpétu Núŋpa
Wednesday - Aŋpétu Yámni
Thursday - Aŋpétu Tópa
Friday - Aŋpétu Záptaŋ
Saturday - Owáŋkayužažapi
Sunday - Aŋpétuwakȟáŋ

Active verbs (for Kaylee :) ). Verbs in Lakhota can be divided generally into active and stative groups, where active verbs usually denote an action controlled by the actor, while stative verbs usually describe a state or condition not actively controlled by the actor. There are exceptions, however (at least looking at it from an English-speaker point of view), like ločhíŋ - to be hungry - which is an active verb. Knowing the etymology of words though helps in understanding, and in this case ločhíŋ comes from the words lol- ("food") and čhíŋ ("to want"). I plan to do a post on the interesting word combinations I've come across at some point. :)

Anyway, there are three main conjugation patterns for active verbs and several exceptions. I'll demonstrate the first two classes with examples:

Class I verb: slolyé = to know it

slolwáye I know it
slolyáye You (s.) know it
slolyé He/she/it knows it

slol'úŋye You and I know it

slolʼúŋyaŋpi We know it
slolyáyapi You (pl.) know it
slolyápi They know it


Class II verb: yuhá = to have it (not used for relatives or body parts though)

bluhá I have it
luhá You (s.) have it
yuhá He/she/it has it

uŋyúha You and I have it

uŋyúhapi We have it
luhápi You (pl.) have it
yuhápi They have it


I missed yesterday, so the words of the day: iyápi - n. language

Lakȟótiyapi - n. Lakhota language
wašíčuiyapi - n. English language
tȟogʼíyapi - n. foreign language
wíyutȟapi - n. sign language
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-10, 3:26

Massimiliano B wrote:Whether one is a religious person or not, I think this site is very good, because you can see a movie in many languages. Choose a language in 'search languages starting with'.


Not really my cup of tea, but I'm such a language junkie I'll probably watch the version in Inuktitut or Romani...<sigh>
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

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Re: księży - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-10, 3:27

Hey, nice post :D
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

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Re: księży - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-10, 11:25

Thanks!

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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-10, 11:29

It's not exactly my cup of tea either, but I started watching it in a few languages, just for the hell of it.
I enjoyed the Irish and Cree versions (well, the little I watched).

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Re: księży - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-10, 20:38

Short Update today:

Mostly worked on some of the pronunciation drills in the first lesson.

iƞ is a pretty fun vowel to my ears; I'm not used to that sound.

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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-11, 3:50

Dear Diary,

Got kind of distracted by Irish today... :blush: But not to fear :wink: . An example of a Class III verb:

úŋ = to use/wear it

múŋ - I use it
núŋ - You (s.) use it
úŋ - He/she/it uses it

uŋkʼúŋ - You and I use it

uŋkʼúŋpi - We use it
núŋpi - You (pl.) use it
úŋpi - They use it

Word of the Day: haŋwí - n. moon
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

Mol_Bolom

Re: NAILC 2011 - Remis - [CHR]

Postby Mol_Bolom » 2011-11-11, 6:41

Remis wrote:Hey guys, sorry for not responding. :oops:

@Mol_Bolom: That would be awesome! :D


Yer not the only one. Been busy myself, and now trying to work on the next set of materials for http://www.cherokeelessons.com Yeek...

Anyhoo, here's a link to some of the sound files I have on dropbox.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8119425/cheroke ... files.html
<Edit> I updated the html file with a few translations, and made a few changes...(Needing to learn css and html design again, AAAAAAAAAAAAAH!) </tidE>

Unfortunately, they're not all translated, some have translations in the Comments, lyrics section so you'd have to play them in a player to see if they have translations or not.

There are two files which sole purpose is to aid the beginner with the -tl- sounds. tl-example-with-kl.mp3 and tl-example-with-tl.mp3. There have been many instances of beginners mistaking -tl- for -kl-, and I thought it would be helpful for them to listen to both forms so they can see that -tl- doesn't sound like -kl-. (There's no -kl- sound that I've seen in Cherokee).

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księżycowy
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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-11, 16:48

Struthiomimus wrote:Dear Diary

Nice touch. :lol:

Got kind of distracted by Irish today... :blush:

That's funny, I'm working on some today. :P

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Re: 鼯鼠 ももんが Blackfoot journal NAILC

Postby モモンガ » 2011-11-11, 21:58

ええと
最近はね、ポストを書けなかった。
何も勉強していなかった。
頑張らないとね。but I have at least one more book, it's more for children, I think, but... there are not many resources for this language.
[flag]tr[/flag]Türkçe [flag]vi[/flag]㗂越[flag]lo[/flag]ພາສາລາວ[flag]tet[/flag]Prasa Tetun

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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-12, 3:44

Reviewed and looked up words in the dictionary, from which I chose...

Word of the Day: uŋkčéǧila tȟáŋka - n. dinosaur 8-)
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

Struthiomimus
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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-12, 3:47

księżycowy wrote:
Struthiomimus wrote:Dear Diary

Nice touch. :lol:

Got kind of distracted by Irish today... :blush:

That's funny, I'm working on some today. :P


Is maith liom Gaeilge. :)
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-12, 11:05

Irish iyápi kȟó waštéwalake! :wink:

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Re: księży - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-13, 20:57

Working on some vocabulary today.

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Re: NAILC 2011 - Struthiomimus - LKT

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-14, 4:04

Hello, Hello. Háu, Háu. :silly:

Okay for today: seasons.

spring - wétu
summer - blokétu
fall - ptaŋyétu
winter - waníyetu


Words of the Day:

mnikhúkhuše - n. hippopotamus

čhaŋmháŋska ǧí - n. chocolate

księżycowy wrote:Irish iyápi kȟó waštéwalake!


Touché. :mrgreen:
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."


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