Kaylee—Lakȟotiyapi

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Kaylee
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Kaylee—Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-05, 4:46

Hello!

For NAILC I decided on Lakȟóta to work on, as I was already working on it and I really -- really -- love the language. :mrgreen:

I don't have many resources with my, like the lessons or psychical dictionary, I learn for free off this forum and from the people there. At least, until I can actually afford the lessons and dictionary of course! :lol:

I've never done one of these things, so I'm not sure exactly what to put here. If I screwed something up, please tell me and I'll fix it up!

So for now, I will post what I've learned, what I'm learning etc etc.

Anyway, some notes of what I've learned? I'll start off with the vowel/consonant inventory and their pronunciation? Simple stuff first! :)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vowel/Consonant Inventory & Pronunciation:

/a/ a like in father (Example word in LKT: aǧúyapi)
/e/ e like in bed (Example word in LKT: épazo)
/i/ i like i in sit (Example word in LKT: ígmu)
/o/ o like in soft (Example word in LKT: oákaŋke)
/u/ u like in put (Example word in LKT: úta)
/aŋ/ like o in money, nasalized (Example word in LKT: aŋpétuwi)
/íŋ/ almost like i in mink (Example word in LKT: íŋyaŋ)
/uŋ/ like oo in moon, nasalized (Example word in LKT: uŋčí)

/g/ like g in got (Example word in LKT: gnašká)
/ǧ/ like the northern French r (Example word in LKT: ǧí)
/h/ like h in hat (Example word in LKT: hokšíla)
/ȟ/ close to Spanish x in Mexico (Example word in LKT: ȟé)
/č/ almost like ch in rich (Example word in LKT: čónala)
/čh/ like ch h in much haste (Example word in LKT: čhápa)
/čʼ/ like č but followed by a glottal stop (Example word in LKT: čʼó)
/k/ like k in skip, but not like k in kip (Example word in LKT: kimímela )
/kh/ like k h in back home (Example word in LKT: khéya)
/kȟ/ connect k and ȟ (no equivalent in English) (Example word in LKT: kȟáŋta)
/kʼ/ like k but followed by a glottal stop (Example word in LKT: kʼá )
/p/ like p in spin, but not like p in pin (Example word in LKT: pispíza)
/ph/ like p h in steep hill (Example word in LKT: pheží)
/pȟ/ connect p and ȟ (no equivalent in English) (Example word in LKT: pȟahíŋ )
/pʼ/ like p but followed by glottal stop (Example word in LKT: pʼó)
/t/ like t in still, but not like t in till (Example word in LKT: tópa)
/th/ like th in sit here (Example word in LKT: thípi )
/tȟ/ connect t and ȟ (no equivalent in English) (Example word in LKT: tȟatȟáŋka)
/tʼ/ like t followed by a glottal stop (Example word in LKT: tʼá)
/s/ like s in so (Example word in LKT: sí)
/š/ like sh in shop (Example word in LKT: šúŋka)
/z/ like z in zero (Example word in LKT: zičá)
/ž/ like s in pleasure (Example word in LKT: žó )
/b/ like b in boy (Example word in LKT: bebéla)
/l/ like l in lamp (Example word in LKT: lowáŋ)
/m/ like m in map (Example word in LKT: mathó)
/n/ like n in nap (Example word in LKT: napé)
/w/ like w in was (Example word in LKT: wičhíŋčala)
/y/ like y in yes (Example word in LKT: yámni)
/ʼ/ catch in the throat; like the pause between the syllables in "uh-oh" (glottal stop)(Example word in LKT: )

*please look here for a prettier chart*

Numbers:

waŋži = one
núŋpa = two (twice)
yámni = three (to be three)
tópa = four
záptaŋ = five
šákpe = six *My favorite number*
šakówiŋ = seven
šaglóǧaŋ = eight
napčíyuŋka = nine
wikčémna = ten

Lakȟóta word order:

Lakȟóta's syntax is SOV, subject-object-verb.

Some phrases I have learned:

Philámayaye. = I thank you (sg.).
Philámayayapi. = I thank you all (pl.).

Philáuŋyayapi. = We thank you (sg./pl.).

Philámaye. = I thank him/her.
Philámayapi. = I thank them.
Philáuŋyaŋpi. = We thank him/her/them.

Male speakers add :

Philámayaye ló. (philámaya yeló is incorrect, so use this!)
Philámayayape ló
Philáuŋyayape ló.
Philámaye ló.
Philámayape ló.
Philáuŋyaŋpe ló.

A "Thank you" can also be expressed with wóphila:

híŋhaŋni wašté - good morning
aŋpétu wašté - good day
ȟtayétu wašté - good evening

Summary of terms for addressing each other:

And as of today (5th of November!) I just learned some new phrases/sentences that I thought would be interesting to share. At least, I found it interesting! As

COUSIN:
tȟaŋháŋši – man to a man
haŋkáši – man to a woman
čépȟaŋši – woman to a woman
šič’éši – woman to a man

UNCLE, AUNT
lekší – uncle
tȟuŋwíŋ – aunt

NIECE
tȟuŋžáŋ – man speaking
tȟožáŋ – woman speaking

NEPHEW
tȟuŋšká – man speaking
tȟošká – woman speaking

FRIEND
kȟolá – man to a man
máške – woman to a woman
okȟólayA – gender neutral, but usually not used as a term of address

ADDRESSING A GENERAL AUDIENCE
mitákuyepi – my relatives

What I learned about this (the above), reminds me a lot of Japanese. I haven't looked into Japanese much, but my sister is learning and often tells me about it. In a way, it functions just like "chan" and "sama".

Traditionally and with much respect, the above terms were, and still are, used. For people who are close in age, they refer to them as "cousin" (tȟaŋháŋši, haŋkáši, šič’éši, čépȟaŋši; depends on their gender). When you are addressing someone who is older, the terms lekší (uncle) or tȟuŋwíŋ (aunt) are used.

Now you might be thinking "but now you are addressing that person as your cousin". From what I've read and learn, there is a BIG difference between calling someone your cousin/etc etc out of respect than actually calling them your (actual) cousin. For example: ȟaŋháŋšiwaye kiŋ – he is my cousin & hakátawaye kiŋ – my cross cousin.

I thought this was interesting because, as I've seen this to be true, translators and "outsiders" often confuse these terms as the person/receiver being accepted into society or the family, when this is not so. This is the most polite way to address unrelated peoples, whilst terms like son, daughter, brother, sister, etc etc are used for more intimate or adoptive relationships!

I thought it was really neat and unique! Image So if you want to address the forum or members here, learn the four terms (cousin etc etc) respectfully and apply them as directed! If you know the person you are talking to and you know they are (considerably) younger/older than you, you may also use the terms: “uncle,” “aunt,” “nephew,” and “niece” appropriately. OH! I almost forgot! If you are addressing a general audience, you can use -- mitákuyepi – my relatives.

END NOTES:

I'm not very far into Lakhota, so I hope everyone can excuse me for that. But! I'm still learning and trying as hard as I can! I have more to post, so hold on!

So I hope my post is good and can help someone who is in a situation like mine some! And if its allowed, I could take questions? :blush:

Lastly, If anyone is reading this please wait until I post at least one more before you post. I will need the first two posts. :) Also, please report if the above leads to incorrect links!

Thank you! And sorry for the HUGE post!

Post Information:

October 27th, 2012 EDITS > Changed the title to "NAILC; 2nd Annual Powwow" for the second annual powwow.
Last edited by Kaylee on 2012-10-28, 0:17, edited 1 time in total.
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Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-05, 4:48

As mentioned earlier,I will be working with Struthiomimus and księżycowy on Lakȟóta for the TAC; translating etc etc. But besides that, I hope I to learn something from everyone participating! There are so many NA languages that I want to learn, so seeing everyone else's threads will certainly help. Anyways, onto what I've recently learned!

I have decided to redo all the my forum lessons* on the forum for NAILC, to refresh my mind once more. I have recently redid #4.

Word:

Wačhíŋ = want something "I want etc etc"

When paired with the indefinite article waŋží (a/an), Waŋží marks things that are unspecified or hypothetical. And if we put a stative verb, we can get:

ígmu sápA waŋží wačhíŋ
I want a black cat.

Oh, one last thing. A stative verb does not have to be included in the above to make it correct. :) For example: ígmu waŋží wačhíŋ = I want a cat

During course #5, I learned that living things have a different form of the verb. So the following template can only be for inanimate objects:

Word:

waštéwalake = to like or to love something/sb

Čhúŋwaŋča waštéwalake. | I like forests
Waskúyeča waštéwalake. | I like fruits/berries.
Waháŋpi waštéwalake. | I like soup/broth.

Wóyakapi wóiȟa waštéwalake. | I like funny stories.

On lesson #6, I learned how to form questions with the enclitic "he". In questions, "waŋ" (a certain one) becomes hypothetical and must become "waŋží (an hypothetical one)". Luhá is singular "you have". Questions, as I've learned, will always end in "waŋží luhá he".

On a completely new lesson I have just completed:

I am learning how to practice using numbers within sentences/questions! With the pattern "tóna opȟéyatȟuŋ he?" one cannot write/ask about body parts or relatives, or animate objects -- only countable objects, at least that's what lesson 7 says! Lesson 8 is next. :wink:

For example:

Wówapi tóna opȟéyatȟuŋ he? Wówapi wihčémna yámni opȟéwatȟuŋ!

Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ tóna opȟéyatȟuŋ he? Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ núŋpa opȟéwatȟuŋ!

Word of the Day! *inspiration for this from "Struthiomimus"*

Šuŋgmánitu tȟáŋka = n. wolf, literally "big dog".
(My FAVORITE word. :>)
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-07, 4:08

Wow. Now those are detailed posts 8-) Good job! And I like you doing a word of the day too. This way I'll be exposed to even more Lakhota words :) Philámayaye ló, haŋkáši!
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-07, 11:46

The notes are quite extensive, aren't they? I couldn't even take it all in the first time I read them. :silly:

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-14, 4:10

Kaylee wrote:
Word:

waštéwalake = to like or to love something/sb

Čhúŋwaŋča waštéwalake. | I like forests
Waskúyeča waštéwalake. | I like fruits/berries.
Waháŋpi waštéwalake. | I like soup/broth.

Wóyakapi wóiȟa waštéwalake. | I like funny stories.



Actually, the base form is waštélakA - to like somebody/something. "WaštéwalakA" is specifically the first-person singular.

And hey, more words of the day! :D
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-14, 5:49

Oh? I've learned that waštéwalake is used for inanimate objects as relatives, living things etc etc have a different form of verb. :blush: Like "Tȟaspáŋ waštéwalake. = I like apples."

Now I am confused, because they (the forum) said I got it right, I just forgot to a few spellings like "š". :oops:

@ Struthiomimus & księżycowy's early post:

Tó!

They are? I'll try to keep `em detailed, if that's what you guys want? :)

*Oh, and 'Tó' can be used in reply to a "thank you". It means "you're welcome!"*

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] Haŋwí
moon
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-14, 10:45

Kaylee wrote:@ Struthiomimus & księżycowy's early post:

Tó!

They are? I'll try to keep `em detailed, if that's what you guys want? :)

*Oh, and 'Tó' can be used in reply to a "thank you". It means "you're welcome!"*

Wow, such a sort word for "thank you/you're welcome!" I have yet to get into conversational phrases.

And you don't have to make them that detailed. It just depends on how much you've done and how much you can write about it. :wink: I mean, look at my last few posts, not too much there.
The only important thing to remember is just to update this log as much as you can.

And to answer your question, yes, they are. :D

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-15, 4:34

Kaylee wrote:Oh? I've learned that waštéwalake is used for inanimate objects as relatives, living things etc etc have a different form of verb. :blush: Like "Tȟaspáŋ waštéwalake. = I like apples."

Now I am confused, because they (the forum) said I got it right, I just forgot to a few spellings like "š". :oops:

@ Struthiomimus & księżycowy's early post:

Tó!

They are? I'll try to keep `em detailed, if that's what you guys want? :)

*Oh, and 'Tó' can be used in reply to a "thank you". It means "you're welcome!"*

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] Haŋwí
moon


I was just referring to the conjugation form you used, not the application of the verb. The conjugation is:

waštéwalake
waštéyalake
waštélake

waštéuŋlake

waštéuŋlakapi
waštéyalakapi
waštélakapi

And usually, the third person singular is used as the "dictionary" form of the verb. So waštélake is translated as "to like" (although it's not an infinitive in Lakhota) and "she/he likes," while waštéwalake is simply "I like" :) .

As for not being used for people, I don't think that's true because the dictionary entry gives "to like somebody/something" and also examples like "Waštémalake šni." - "He/she doesn't like me."

I checked your sentences on the forum too, and they look fine. No worries. I think I just didn't explain myself well. A thousand pardons. :silly:
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-15, 6:15

@księżycowy:

Yup, very short! xD

Well, if it helps others, I will do it! Besides, I suppose its better if I do make detailed notes. :)

@Struthiomimus:

I haven't learned the others yet, and I only learn what they teach. :blush:
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-17, 5:16

Hello! :mrgreen:

I forgot to explain a bit more into my last (big) update regarding questions. I gave some examples, but I never translated! Let me fix that!

Wówapi tóna opȟéyatȟuŋ he? Wówapi wihčémna yámni opȟéwatȟuŋ!
How many "books" (object) have you bought? I bought 3 books!

Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ tóna opȟéyatȟuŋ he? Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ núŋpa opȟéwatȟuŋ!
How many "TVs" (object) have you bought? I bought 2 televisions/tvs!

====================================================================================

Today I first learned more about questions and how to answer them. This type of pattern can have animate objects, but nothing plural (so it has to be singular). Sometimes the lessons are written unclear, so I misunderstand a lot, but in this can it seems I do not have the forum's permission to view the link it gives on detail of the rules, so forgive me please if I made a boo-boo -- they will be fixed immediately when seen! I will try and explain as best as possible!

This pattern will have the use of ablauts, because a verb doesn't ablaut in front of the question enclitic "he" or "hwo" (in formal speech men use "hwo"), but it does at the end of a sentence. For example, "waŋláka he?" and in the answer it says: "waŋbláke."

For an example of how this works, I will use one of my favorite words existent in Lakȟóta!

Šuŋgmánitu tȟáŋka čík’ala kiŋ hé waŋláka he? - Háŋ, Šuŋgmánitu tȟáŋka k’uŋ hé waŋbláke!
Did you see that little wolf? - Yes, I did see that little wolf!

The questions are answered with "k’uŋ hé" instead of repeating "kiŋ hé" because the expression "k’uŋ hé" refers to the aforesaid -- meaning that "I did or did not see the aforesaid object". Also, I don't know if its actually mandatory, but the thread advices to answer only with the noun. :P

Another thing that I learned is a way to express a basic need; hunger. Its pretty hard to explain from what I've read and I'm not sure I fully understand, but here it goes! The basic pattern is;

Lowáčhiŋ... | Supȟéstola waŋží yúta ye/yo.

"Lowáčhiŋ" means "I'm hungry" and one can answer this need by "Supȟéstola (Food item) zí waŋží yúta ye/yo" > "Eat a/an (food item)!". In my sentence, I said "I'm hungry!" and self answered with "Eat a banana!" :lol:

With this pattern, liquids cannot be used, only food that can be eaten -- like an apple, or pie, or even a hamburger. Liquids have their own pattern!

Lastly, today, I learned something based around the first lesson I took. The pattern was "noun (N) + stative verb (VS) + waŋ + transitive verb (VT) " and now it will be "noun (N) + waŋ + stative verb (VS) + čha + transitive verb (VT)", the difference being that the second pattern having a relative clause in it. :)

Once again, will be using my favorite word for this pattern!

a) Šuŋgmánitu tȟáŋka sápa waŋ awíblukčaŋ. I am thinking about a black wolf.
b) Šuŋgmánitu tȟáŋka waŋ sápa čha awíblukčaŋ. I am thinking about a wolf that is black.

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] psíčA
To jump, to leap, to hop
====================================================================================

Well, that is all for now! :mrgreen:
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-20, 3:01

Aŋpétu wašté!

Hello everyone! I can't really write down what I learned today in great detail, so please forgive the flimsy post!

First I learned to build sentences with "waŋ....kiŋ...", unlike last time when I learned to write sentences with "waŋ....čha...". Here are some sentences I did with it:

Igmútȟaŋka waŋ tȟamáheča kiŋ waŋbláke. = I saw a lion who was skinny.
Matȟó waŋ tȟáŋka kiŋ waŋbláke! = I saw a bear who was big!

I'm currently waiting for any corrections that might need fixing, but that's how we learn anyways!

On the next lesson I learned about a pattern concerning time. This pattern/sentence has three parts only; a period of time-during-I do something. The pattern I did in this lesson was for day only. Here is what the thread say, since it can explain it better:

Aŋpétu____čháŋna____mawáni.
It is day____during/whenever it is____I walk.

My sentence:

Aŋpétu čháŋna itówapi owá.

Lastly, I learn of another simple question pattern.

"Tóhaŋ (V-INT) he?" > When did you (he, she, they) do something?
The pattern always consists of the question word tóhaŋ, an Intransitive verb (V-INT) in 2nd or 3rd person singular or plural and the question marker he.

Note: The question word tóhaŋ refers to a specific event in the past.


My sentences:

Tóhaŋ nuŋwÁŋ he?
Tóhaŋ nuŋwáŋpi he?
Tóhaŋ íŋyaŋkA he?

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] Agléškala
a lizard
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Kaylee
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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-23, 20:03

UPDATE! I do 3 lessons an update, by the way -- if anyone was curious. :D

On the first lesson, lesson #14, I learned how to ask someone what they were going to do tomorrow (next day). The pattern, for example, is this:

Híŋhaŋni kiŋ mayáni kta he? Will you walk tomorrow?


híhaƞnimayániktahe
tomorrowyou walkwillquestion


Be careful! If your chosen verb ends in A or Aŋ, remember that the final A / Aŋ changes to iŋ when followed by ktA.


Here are my sentences for the lesson!

Híŋhaŋni kiŋ wayáčhi kta he?
Híŋhaŋni kiŋ wówaši ečhánuŋ kta he?
Híŋhaŋni kiŋ yátiŋ kta he?

On lesson #15, I learned about hot and cold things. Not "feelings", and only for inanimate objects and not for body parts. There is also ablaut vowel changes at the end of the sentence and before šni.

Sní; Cold
KȟátA; Hot (please take note of the ablaut )

Mní kiŋ sní.
Aŋpétu kiŋ sní. (I love the cold though)
Waháŋpi kiŋ kȟáte.

On the last lesson today, I learned how to say what we do with someone. Pattern is:
object - with - I (action). ==> Šúŋka - kičhí - mawáni.

Something to keep in mind for those who are following this thread:
please take in mind:
kičhí is not used with miyé and niyé.
kičhí is used in ref. to a single object , a person an animal or thing.
kičhí in some where english uses "and" like "Mary and Karl came" the translation is Mary Karl kičhí hí => Mary came with Karl.
kičhí is not used with inanimate objects, instead yuhá is used (e.g. Tȟápa yuhá škáte. = He played with a ball) Thanks Jan!!.


My sentences:

Iná kičhí lolʼíwaȟʼaŋ.
Čhuwé kičhí wabláwa.
Igmú kičhí waškáte.

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] Owáyawa
to go to school, to study; to read
Last edited by Kaylee on 2011-11-23, 21:09, edited 1 time in total.
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-23, 20:43

Kaylee wrote:*I don't know how to use the tables guys...sorry. :(*


Like this:

Code: Select all

[table align=center][tr][td]híhaƞni[/td][td]mayáni[/td][td]kta[/td][td]he[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]tomorrow[/td][td]you walk[/td][td]will[/td][td]question[/td][/tr][/table]


Which gives:

híhaƞnimayániktahe
tomorrowyou walkwillquestion



[table] is for the overall table (align can = center, right or left)
[tr] is for the rows
[td] is for the individual cells.

I know, it's a bit complex. Don't worry if you can't get it to work. It look me a while to get it down myself. But now I show 'em off! :P

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-23, 21:08

Oh! I was typing [tr_]CONTENTS HERE[/_tr]. I think I get it now. :mrgreen:


Imadeone!
BOOYA!


Thanks księżycowy! I'll edit my post right now. :)
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby księżycowy » 2011-11-23, 22:08

No prob! :D

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Struthiomimus » 2011-11-24, 3:47

Kaylee wrote: Agléškala
a lizard


Kaylee wrote: Owáyawa
to go to school, to study; to read


Hey, I like these words. Philámayaye ló, haŋkáši! :D
[flag=]wbp[/flag] [flag=]qu[/flag] [flag=]eo[/flag] [flag=]wo[/flag] [flag=]rom[/flag] [flag=]csb[/flag] [flag=]lkt[/flag]

"Beshav me akana kai le chirikle chi gilaban." kaj, "Beidh ceol, caint agus craic againn."

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-25, 4:32

Tó šičʼéši! :mrgreen:

I completed 3 more lessons today. First lesson, #17, I learned to "wish" for something. Example "I wish I had a ranch!" using "ní", which actually has various meanings. But in this instance and pattern, "ní" will mean "if only"; "I wish" (express a wish). We will also use "waŋží", as you probably remember, because it hypothetical and so is this pattern.


Míla waŋží bluhá ní.
Knife a hypothetical one I have I wish
Objectdeterminerdemonstrative vt+2 (transitive verb + 2 valence)enclitic

Please follow the pattern. Use the pattern and put in an object you wish you had. Please use singular and no body parts or relatives please.


My sentences:

Šiyótȟaŋka tȟó waŋží bluhá ní.
Míwakȟaŋ waŋží bluhá ní.
Íŋyaŋ othéȟika waŋží bluhá ní.
Šuŋgmánitu tȟáŋka waŋží bluhá ní.

Second lesson, #18, it was extremely basic with the usage of "Šni", the negation marker. Here are my sentences:

Maštéhaŋpa waštéwalake šni.
Wakȟályapi waštéwalake šni.
IyéčhiŋkiyaŋkA waštéwalake šni.

The last lesson is a little hard to explain the pattern. :hmm: Its joining some of the previous lessons into one. There are rules for the pattern, which will be posted after my sentences. Pattern:

Wówapi tȟaŋnígnila etáŋ luhá he? = Do you have any old books?

My sentences:

Omásʼapȟe čikčíkʼala etáŋ luhá he?
Ikȟáŋčhola šašá etáŋ luhá he?
Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ tȟaŋktȟáŋka etáŋ luhá he?

Please keep in mind:
~ You are allowed to change all words which are not colored, i.e. the noun and the reduplicated verb of your question, however please keep the colored phrase etáŋ luhá he?
~ do only use inanimate nouns
~ do not write about body parts or relatives
~ do not translate your sentences into English
~ you can write as many sentences as you wish


Next lessons: #20, #21, and #22!

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] Omásʼapȟe
a telephone

Tókša akhé waŋčhíyaŋkiŋ kte! :mrgreen:
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-26, 1:29

Update!

On lesson #20, I learned another pattern that is 'kinda' mixed with previous lesson's patterns using "eyá" and the plural of living things "pi". For example, here are my sentences:

Ziŋtkála eyá kiŋyáŋpi
Šúŋkawakȟáŋ eyá khiíŋyaŋkapi
Šuŋgmánitu tȟáŋka eyá íŋyaŋkapi

On lesson #21, however, it got pretty interesting (to me at least). On a previous lesson I learned how to ask "When did you (he, she, they) do something? Tóhaŋ iyáglakapi he?". Today, I learned how to say "When will you (he, she, they, etc..) do something?" Toháŋl hí kta he?".

note: Toháŋl refers to an anticipated event in the future.


Toháŋl inúŋkiŋ kta he?
Toháŋl yútiŋ kta he?
Toháŋl psíčiŋ kta he?

REMEMBER THAT "kta" TRIGGERS "iŋ" ABLAUT!

Lastly, on lesson #22, I learned how to write a conditional statement. :mrgreen: For example, "If tomorrow is hot I will swim". Here is the pattern:

Híŋhaŋni kiŋiokȟáteháŋtaŋšwanúŋwiŋkte.
>
adverb (noun + determiner)impersonal verbconjunctionintransitive verbfuture enclitic.


My sentences:

Híŋhaŋni kiŋ maǧážu háŋtaŋš wabláwa kte.
Híŋhaŋni kiŋ mašté háŋtaŋš hokhúwa kte.

That is all for today!

Next lessons: #23, #24, and #25!

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] Wačhípi
dance, dancing, powwow
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-29, 5:26

Hello!

Today in lesson #23, I learned how to ask what the color of something was. For example "Question – Answer pattern; for example, What is the color of that book? -- That book is blue.".

My sentence:

Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ kiŋ hé oówa tókča he? --- Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ kiŋ hé ȟóta.
Hunáhomnipi kiŋ hé oówa tókča he? --- Hunáhomnipi kiŋ hé ša.
Wáta kiŋ hé oówa tókča he? --- Wáta kiŋ hé ská.

Part 2 of Lesson #23, I had to change some given sentences in the thread.

#1 Igmú zíša waŋ bluhá.
#5 Čhuŋwíyaphe šatȟó waštéwalake.
#6 Agléškala sápa waŋží luhá he?
#7 Hunáhomnipi tȟó tóna opȟéyatȟuŋ he?
#19 Šiyútakaŋ šašá etáŋ luhá he?

On lesson #24, I learned how to work with "yuhá", "she/he/it has". Some rules for the pattern:
Just some little rules please:
1. Please use singular animate or inanimate nouns.
2. Please *do not* use body parts or relatives. They take a different verb than yuhá. I promise we will get to that at another lesson.
3. Please just change the words in blue and keep the kiŋ yuhá.
4. Please use a stative verb only.
5. Please note that kiŋ triggers the e-ablaut.
6. Please do not translate your sentences.



Here are my sentences:

Owíŋža šóke kiŋ yuhá.
Waháŋpi kȟáte kiŋ yuhá.
Ógle háŋska tȟáŋka kiŋ yuhá.

On lesson #25, (which honestly I'm not sure what it wanted >.>) I suppose I learned (or am learning lol) how to answer "What are you looking at?" question? :hmm:

My sentences:

Tuwé čha alúta he?

1. Šúŋka kiŋ aglúta.
2. Misúŋka awágluta.
3. Até awágluta

Lastly, which I thought you guys might find useful, is how to say "My name is [NAME]". It is:

Haú, [NAME] emáčiyapi.

So I would say "Haú, Karina emáčiyapi"!

Something else I thought was useful is the phrase "Taŋyéhči Lakȟótuwaye šni.". It means "I do not speak Lakhóta fluently.". And if you say "Taŋyáŋ Wašíčuiwaye", you are saying "I speak English fluently". Here are some other phrases:

Wíyuškiŋyaŋ waŋčhíyaŋke. (It is nice to meet you.)
Haú, [name] emáčiyapi. (Hello, my name is [name])
Táku eníčiyapi he? (What is your name? )

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] Wáta
Boat, canoe
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi

Postby Kaylee » 2011-11-30, 3:10

Hello and welcome to another update!

Today on Lesson #26, I learned how to say "I intend to [BLANK]" with "wačháŋmi". Some rules:
Note that the verb wačhíŋ - "to intend to do sth.", "to plan to do sth." changes to wačháŋmi, for 1s. It follows active verbs in infinitive and triggers e-ablaut or contraction.

For our exercise, only use intransitive verbs (V-INT) with 1s. wačháŋmi - and don't mix it up with 1s. "wačhíŋ".


My sentences:

Na waná wówapi káǧe wačháŋmi.
Na waná itówapi owá wačháŋmi.
Na waná íŋyaŋke wačháŋmi.

On Lesson #27, it was a pattern concerning colors and reduplication on the word. Ablaut was present, no living things (animate; living things) could be used with the pattern and had to stuck to plural inanimate (reduplication). Pattern:



Huŋyákȟuŋkiŋlenázizí.
Sockthetheseare yellow.
Noun(N)Definite articledemonstrativeVS-red + 1


My sentences:

Wówapi kiŋ lená šašá (redup).
Omníčagmniyaŋyaŋ kiŋ lená tȟózi.

Lastly, on lesson #28 (which the pattern was not elaborated on lol), I learned um, how to write a verb in its plural form. :lol:

My sentences:

Kȟokȟóyaȟʼaŋla kiŋ hená khuwápi.
Waglékšuŋ kiŋ hená ǧúpi.

Word of the Day:

[flag]lkt[/flag] Waglékšuŋ
Wild turkey (male; used as generic in the south)
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!


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