ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏙᎢ ᏂᏛᏛᏁᎵ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ

Mol_Bolom

ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏙᎢ ᏂᏛᏛᏁᎵ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ

Postby Mol_Bolom » 2010-12-24, 3:49

This is something I had worked on a couple of days. There's still a few parts that I don't know, and I still have a bit of work to do on it, but eh, considering some of the posts about how quiet it's been around here, I figure this'll keep several people preoccupied figuring it out...

Layout...
Cherokee Alphabet
Translation
Literal translation (Not in fix order)

Dashes (-) such as in she-will-do means that it is one word in the Cherokee translation, to keep it as even as possible.

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(This is an excerpt from the Cherokee Phoenix Online Newspaper. Don't remember the link.)


ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏙᎢ ᏂᏛᏛᏁᎵ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ
Cherokee language immersion school teacher retires
Cherokee School Teacher Motionless she-will-do she-was-teaching-them


ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎸᎵᎰᎻ.---- ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ Reba Rodgers ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎧᎵᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏅᎩ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎤᎶᏒᏍᏗ ᏕᎨᏲᎲᎦ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎠᎦᏔᎾᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏂ ᏥᏚᎾᏛᏏᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ.
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Reba Rodgers speaks the Cherokee language fluently, and for the past four years she’s shared that knowledge with the next generation of Cherokee speakers.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma. ---- Cherokee Nation member Reba Rodgers speaker Cherokee full, and that four years [?] She taught them the-way knowledge that next [?] Cherokee speakers.

Rodgers ᏙᎢ ᏄᏛᏁᎸ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ ᎯᏍᎩᏦᏁᏏᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎯᎠ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲᎠᎬᏱ ᏗᏂᏂᏙᎯ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. ᎠᏎᏍᎩᏂ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏙᎢ ᏥᏄᏛᏁᎸ ᎾᏝᎬ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ.
Rodgers retired June 25 from her job as a first grade teacher at the tribe’s Cherokee Language Immersion Program. But her recent retirement is actually her second time retiring as a teacher.

Rodgers motionless she-did June 25th there this she-was-working first [?] there Cherokee Nation Cherokee language class. but-possibly/definitely that this motionless [that which / specific past tense]-she-did earlier second was there she-was-teaching-them.
[Note: In this sentence the suffix -tso[ne] was used with the number 5. Therefore, hisgitsoi or hisgitsonei means 25, and hisgitsonesine is 25th]

“ᏚᏕᏲᏅ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏅᎩ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏗᏂᏂᏙᎯ ᏗᎦᏓᏲᏍᏛ. ᎠᎴ ᎤᏓᎾᏖᎴ, ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᏙᎢ ᏯᏆᏛᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Rebecca Drywater, ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᏧᎦᏎᏍᏗᏕᎦ.
“She taught 24 years in the first grade at Marble City. Then she decided, ‘I want to go into retirement,’” said Rebecca Drywater, language project supervisor.
"She taught them 20 4 years there first [?] [?]. And she-thought, I-want motionless if-I-to-do," she-was-saying Rebecca Drywater, language organization/project one-cares-for-them-[? unknown suffix[es] -dega?].

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ Rodgers ᏙᎢ ᏄᏛᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎦᏓᏲᏍᏗᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏏᏉᏲ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏦᎢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏙᎢ ᎢᎬᏩᏛᏁᎸ ᎨᏎ ᎩᎳ ᎤᏢᏁ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎠᏔᏲᎯᎯ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏃᏊᎴ ᎬᏩᏍᏗᏰᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏦᎯᏴ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏪᏣ ᎠᏍᎦᏯ.
The 65-year-old Rodgers was retired from Marble City Schools in Sequoyah County for nearly three years before applying at the immersion school, after much coaxing by her sister-in-law and son.

That 60 5 years Rodgers motionless she-did there [?] Schools there in-Sequoya district three years motionless since she retired/quit was soon/later [? Sat down ?] paper work [applicant] work Cherokee speakers school, that now-[?] her sister in law and her-child man.

[Note: (ᎢᎬᏩᏛᏁᎸ) ga+u yields gvwa-. So he saw him is "ugohv", since he [last] saw him would be "gvwagohv". ᏦᎢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏙᎢ ᎢᎬᏩᏛᏁᎸ ᎨᏎ ?= "3 years since motionless she did". The -i- at the beginning of the word could be one of two things, either an extra sound without meaning, or the prefix ni- modified to -i-]

“ᎠᏆᏦᎯᏴ ᎦᏳᎳ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᎾᎿ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Rodgers. “ᎤᏂᏂᎬᎬ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏗᏂᏂᏙᎯ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᎴᏅᎲᏓᏅᏛᏛᎲᏍᎬ ᎩᎶ ᏳᎾᏅᏔ ᏗᎬᏩᏕᏲᏗ ᏱᎩ. ᎾᎾᏃ ᎤᏓᏃᎯᏎᎴ ᎠᏯ ᎠᎴ ᏙᎢ ᏯᏆᏛᏁᎸᎢ ᎨᏒᎢ, ‘Ꮭ, ᏱᎨᎵ ᏯᏆᏚᎵᎭ.”
“My sister-in-law was already working here,” Rodgers said. “They needed a first grade teacher and they started asking everybody if they knew anybody who wanted to teach. She mentioned me and that I was retired. But I said, ‘no, I don’t think I want to.’”
"My sister in law already she-was-working there," she-was-saying Rodgers. "they-were-achieving-for first [?] teacher and they-began they-were-asking-them someone if-they-know one to teach them them if-is. And-there she-informed-[someone] me and motionless if-I-did was, 'No, I-think-[(See note)] yagwaduliha-[(See note)].
[Note: Note the comma here. Tla, yigeli yagwaduliha. This sentence is quite interesting in that the 'tla' spoken only once to mean 'no' already negates a word in the rest of the sentence. So therefore yigeli yagwaduliha could be either "If-I-think I-don't-want" or "I-don't-think if-I-want".]

ᎢᎸᏍᎩ ᏳᏂᏃᎮᏢ ᎤᏪᏥ ᎠᏍᎦᏯ, ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎴᎯᏌᏅ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏧᏃᏪᎶᏗ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏩᏍᎪᎵᏴ ᏗᎪᏪᎵᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᎢᎬᏁᎯ ᏚᏙᎥ Will Chavez, Rodgers ᏂᏓᏳᏅᎪᏨ ᏙᎢ ᏄᏛᏅ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏕᏲᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏦᎢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏌᏚ ᎢᏳᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᏗ, ᎠᏂᎩᏍᎬ ᏅᎩᏍᎪᎯᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏔᏬᏍᏔᏅ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎡᎬ ᏗᎦᏓᏲᏍᏗ ᏂᏓᏳᏂᎩᏓ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏧᏙᏓᏆᏗ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ.
After several discussions with her son, Cherokee Phoenix Senior Reporter Will Chavez, Rodgers came out of retirement to teach her native language. So for the past three years and 11 months, she has driven 45 minutes to Tahlequah from Marble City five days a week to teach Cherokee.

Several they-discussed her-child man, Cherokee Phoenix paper they-to-write-them workers and extremely-head writer in view doer he-named Will Chavez, Rodgers came-exited motionless he-did work that one to teach them Cherokee language. That three years and eleven months, She-was-leaving 45 minutes long Tahlequah she-was-going [?] she-left five days she-was-teaching-them Cherokee language.

“ᎢᎦᏃ ᏥᏍᏆᏂᎪᏍᎪ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎧᏅᏑᎸ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎣᏥᏅᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎦᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬ, ‘ᎦᏙ ᏓᎦᏛᏁᎵ ᎨᎵᏍᎬᎢ? ᎦᏳᎳ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎭ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ’. ᎠᏎᏃ ᎢᎦ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎩᏰᎸᏒ ᏓᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ. ᎠᏆᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏯᏆᏛᏗᎢ.”
“It was just amazing to hear those kids talk Cherokee when I was sitting in the classroom,” she said. “I thought, ‘what am I going to do? They already know how to talk.’ But I really enjoyed it. I just wish I could do more.”
"and-days I-always-surprised children Cherokee speakers there school room all we-[not you]-were sitting," she-was-saying. "I-was-thinking, 'What I-will-do I-was-thinking? Already they-know-how they-to-speak'. But [amount] good I-accepted I-worked. I-was-wanting more if-I-do."

Rodgers ᏚᏍᏆᏛ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏴᏢᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ bachelor’s degree ᏗᎬᏩᏕᏲᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ. ᎾᏃ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏧᏁᎳ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎤᎪᏔᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬ ᎤᏁᏒ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏓᏁᎯ ᏧᏕᏲᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.
Rodgers graduated from Northeastern State University in 1979 with a bachelor’s degree in education. In 2008, she expanded her education by becoming a certified teacher in Cherokee literacy.

Rodgers she-finished that North-east towards Highest school there 19 100 70 9 [(See note)] that bachelor's degree [(See Note:2)] was. And that two thousand 8 [(See Note:3)], [?] that she-was-teaching [?] allower one-to-teach-them that Cherokee language was.
[Note: ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ = A year in the past.]
[Note:2: ᏗᎬᏩᏕᏲᏗ I am really curious as to what the prefix -gv- means, which might be the same as the first occurrance -igvw-. Either way what I can translate is one-to-teach-them-[?]]
[Note:3: ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ Since this cannot possibly be plural, therefore the prefix ts- has to either be "that which", "the one that", etc, or be the "specific past tense prefix". Therefore this word should roughly translate to "That particular year in the past"].

ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎯᏓ ᏄᎵᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᎾᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᎢᎦ ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎨᏒ ᎤᏛᏏᏗᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎩᎵᏏ ᎣᏂ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎥᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎤᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ.
The language comes easy for her because she grew up speaking Cherokee and learned English as a second language.
Cherokee language easy became-for-her the-way just-that amount speaker was she-grown and English last she-learned and second language was that.

“ᎠᎩᎵᏏ ᎠᏆᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎠᏆᎴᏅᎭ ᏕᎦᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏥᏪᏎᎰ ᎯᎠ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ, ᎠᏎᏃ Ꮭ ᏱᎬᏉᎯᏳᎲᏍᎪ.”
“I had to learn English when I started school,” she said. “That’s what I tell these kids, but they don’t believe me.”
"English I-to-learn was I-began I-was-learning," she-was-saying. "That I-always-tell-them this kids, but not not-they-always-believe-me."

ᏃᏊᏃ ᏙᎢ ᏥᏅᎦᏛᎦ, Rodgers ᎠᎦᏖᏃᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏛᏗ ᏃᏊ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏥᎩ ᎠᎴ Ꮭ ᏳᏠᏅᏓᏕᎮ ᎪᎯᏗ ᏓᎦᎶ ᏃᏊᏃ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏱᎦᏟ ᏙᏓᎪᏢᏂ.
Now retired again, Rodgers is looking forward to activities she hasn’t had time for such as quilt making.
And-now motionless she-did-again, Rodgers looker-around that [?] now this job without that-which-is and not not-she-had-time length-of-time [?] and-now just-possibly quilt she-will-make.

“ᏦᏍᏓᏓᎸ ᎣᏍᏗᏬᏂᏍᎬ , ᎠᎴ ᎨᎵᏍᎬ ᏓᏲᏍᏓᎴᏅ ᏰᎦᏟ ᏙᏍᏙᏢᏍᎬᎢ ᎣᎩᎾᏝᏅᏓᏕᎲᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. “ᎡᏥ ᏥᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏯᏛᏁ ᎨᏒ, ᎠᎴ ᏦᏥᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬ.”. ᏙᎩᏄᎪᏔᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏠᏯ ᏲᎩᎾᏛᏗᎢ.
“My sisters and I were talking, and I think we’re going to start making quilts whenever we can,” she said. “Momma used to do it, and we used to help her. We decided to pick it back up and see what we could do.”
we-sisters-to-each-other we-were-speaking, and I-was-thinking [(See note) we-will-begin] quilt [(See Note:2)] we-will-have-time-[future imparative]," she-said. "My-mother-[(Note:4)] was that she-said-[(See Note:3)] was, and we-were-helping-her.". we-decided that similar if-we-to-do.
[Note: Either a misspelling, or it's not absolutely necessary to add the final -i when using the prefix da-.]
[Note:2: Since the word dayosdalenv should be future tense, this word then might finally show that the future imparative "can" be added to the progressive suffix -g- as well. Hence dosdotlvsgvi might mean "We will make them" (future progressive imparative), either that or it means "We were making them"]
[Note:3: Remember my thoughts on uwena and hesv for the verb ega, this might hold a clue to those. yadvhne (Conditional + Set A 3rd person singular pronoun prefix + Verb + Reportative preterite) when this word would naturally be yudvhne. Or this is another misspelling]
[Note:4: The prefix e- has always been for direct conversation with someone, this usuage is confusing to me. However, there is a possibility this is a dialectual variation. Will need to look into this at a later time]
[Note: Didn't notice until the last word, but every word using the [we] fixes, except for one, uses the dual forms. -ogin-/-osd- [Me and another], however, -ots- means "me and others". What might have happened, is since the pronouns are usually shortened (such as tsa+sdel- becomes tsdel- in pronunciation), therefore osdisdel- might become otsdel-.]

Rodgers ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᎤᎵᏏ ᎠᏧᏣ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎢᏯᏅᏓ ᎨᏱᎭ ᎤᎦᏘᏗᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏫᏙᎵᏓᏍᏗ.
Rodgers also said she wants to baby sit her 9-month-old grandson and travel.
Rodgers said that she-was-wanting grandmother boy 9 months [? part child ?] to-watch and [?].

“Will ᎤᏛᏅ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎦᏲᏟ ᏲᏤᏙᎵᏣ Ꮭ ᎤᎪᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᎣᎩᎸᏉᏗ ᎣᎨᏙᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ.”
“Will said we might travel a little bit,” she said. “We like to travel.”
"Will said just-maybe little [?] not much," she-was-saying. "we-like [?]."

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏣᎯᏯᎢ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏐᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏚᏳᎪᏛ ᏚᏮᎪᏗᏓ.
As for the job she’s leaving, she said she feels the immersion program and other CN language initiatives are moving in a positive direction.
and-that this job [?], she-said there Cherokee studies and other-[things] Cherokee Nation language was that good and very-correct [?].

“ᎡᎵᏊ ᏱᎾᎾᏛᎦ ᎨᎵᎠ (ᏧᎾᎴᎯᏐᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ) ᎢᏳᏃ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏳᎾᏚᎵ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. "ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏖᏗ ᏂᎪᎯᎸ. ᎤᎪᏗ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. ᎠᏎᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᎵᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎾᏁᎸᏗᏍᎬᎢ.”
“I think they can (revitalize the language) if the people would really want to learn,” she said. “They have to have their minds set on it. It’ll take a lot of work for them to learn. But I think it’s good that they’re trying.”
"Just-maybe if-they-[just]-do I-think (they-to-restart Cherokee language) and-amount people very if-they-want they-to-learn," she-said. "and-that they-to-think always. much [?our work? Possible misspelling] that they-to-learn. but good I-always-think and-that they-were-trying."

ᏳᎪᏓ ᏯᏆᏚᎵ ᏯᏆᏛᏗ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᏅᏔ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎬ ᏙᎢ ᎢᏳᏛᏗᎢ.
Though she’d like to do more, she said she knows it’s time to take a break.
If-more if-I-want if-I-to-do, she-said but she-knows she-was-breaking motionless [amount]-she-to-do.

“ᎠᏆᏓᏅᏛ ᎠᏆᏅᏔ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎬᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅ Rodgers. “ᏂᎪᎯᎸ ᏓᎩᏯᏪᎦ ᏕᎦᏍᏔᏰᏍᎪ. ᎨᎵᏍᎬ Ꮎ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎢᎦ ᎣᏍᏓ. ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎢᎦ ᎠᎯᏓ ᏗᎨᏲᏗ. ᎩᎳᏊ ᎢᏴ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎪ. ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎬ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏐ ᎠᏛᎪᏗᎢ.”
“I just feel like it’s time,” Rodgers said. “I’m wore out and tired all the time. I think it’s (immersion program) a great thing. The kids are so easy to teach. They just pick it up so quickly. Just to hear them talk, it’s really good to hear them talk.”
"I-felt I-know [?]," Said Rodgers. "Always I-am-tired [?]. I-was-thinking that Cherokee study amount good. Children amount easy we-to-teach-them. Just-Cherkoee amount they-always-learn. they-were-speaking good always one-to-hear."
Last edited by Mol_Bolom on 2012-10-15, 13:58, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏙᎢ ᏂᏛᏛᏁᎵ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ

Postby księżycowy » 2010-12-24, 13:50

Mol_Bolom wrote: considering some of the posts about how quiet it's been around here, I figure this'll keep several people preoccupied figuring it out...

Thanks for the help! :wink:

Mol_Bolom

Re: ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏙᎢ ᏂᏛᏛᏁᎵ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ

Postby Mol_Bolom » 2012-02-07, 3:05

Howdy, and it's been awhile... :shock:

Anyway, I've worked on another Phoenix article and almost have the entire thing translated except for a few words and possible misspellings and at least one possible incorrect translation.

I've also got a break down of some words such as advneha, nudvneha, and igvneha. It's not perfect, but it's a start.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8119425/cherokee/pdf/pdfs.html

Mol_Bolom

Re: ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏙᎢ ᏂᏛᏛᏁᎵ ᏓᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ

Postby Mol_Bolom » 2012-07-14, 5:19

Added some missing words, and fixed one error.


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