A Sudden Interest

calebfairley
Posts: 25
Joined: 2007-05-24, 3:54

A Sudden Interest

Postby calebfairley » 2007-12-10, 4:39

Hello, all! I've been a browser of this sub-forum ever since I joined UniLang, but never posted in it as I found it to be not quite my language. But today, I woke up and felt absolutely compelled to travel to Greenland.

With that being the case, I want to learn some of the language. I know that Nighean-neonach has posted a topic with learning materials and books but it seems like so much information for a beginner.

What would you suggest for an absolute beginner, Nighean-neonach, or, anyone for that matter? I'd like to start of with pronunciation and then go into grammar. Online resources would benefit me more, as I am quite low on funds for language books and shipping. :p

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks a bunch!

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nighean-neonach
Posts: 2440
Joined: 2007-01-14, 22:39
Real Name: Mona
Gender: female
Location: eadar cuan is teine

Re: A Sudden Interest

Postby nighean-neonach » 2007-12-10, 7:47

calebfairley wrote:What would you suggest for an absolute beginner, Nighean-neonach, or, anyone for that matter?


Oh well, what do you think I've written that topic for?

There is not really any learners' stuff online, this is a language which doesn't come for free :P
You can start reading through my "grammar and structures" topics, but there is nothing about pronunciation there, because I think everyone who is seriously interested will buy some textbook with audio stuff anyway.
You could listen to Greenlandic radio and TV online a bit, there are links somewhere around here as well.
Writing poetry in: Scottish Gaelic, German, English.
Reading poetry in: Latin, Old Irish, French, Ancient Greek, Old Norse.
Talking to people in the shop in: Lithuanian, Norwegian, Irish Gaelic, Saami.
Listening to people talking in the shop in: Icelandic, Greenlandic, Finnish.


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