Lakota Language Course

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Aleco
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Postby Aleco » 2008-03-16, 14:32

I have something here now about "to be". There are many different :?

"Héčha" is used for describing an object and not identifying it.
    - Lé wówapi héčha hwo/he? - Is this a book?
    - Háŋ, lé wówapi (héčha). - Yes, this is a book.

    - Hená miméla kiŋ šašá héčha hwo/he? - Are those circles red?
    - Hiyá, hená miméla kiŋ šašá héčha šni. - No, those circles are not red.


Wow, this forum is so unpopular :lol:
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Postby Nero » 2008-03-22, 0:47

I have also seen this. The word is (as far as I can gather) apparently another form of the demonstrative pronoun "he" (cf: demonstrative pronouns) and the particle "ca" (cf: the particle ca), though I am not entirely sure about these things or how it is used.

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Postby Aleco » 2008-03-22, 9:21

Ah, so they mixed them... All these "to be"'s are killing me :?
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Re: Language Course

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2008-11-19, 2:41

Dammit, I need to stop reading language courses for other languages, it makes me want to learn them. :hmm:

Lakota looks like a pretty good language, but I'm not sure I should set too many language goals. Some of my ancestors were Native Americans, but we aren't sure which tribe. :P

How hard would it be to learn Lakota? Are there any Native American languages that are easier to learn? I'm intrigued my them, but know very little about them. And don't tell me one language is easier than another, because that is utter bullcrap. :lol:
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Re: Language Course

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-11-19, 17:28

sjheiss wrote:Dammit, I need to stop reading language courses for other languages, it makes me want to learn them. :hmm:

Lakota looks like a pretty good language, but I'm not sure I should set too many language goals. Some of my ancestors were Native Americans, but we aren't sure which tribe. :P

How hard would it be to learn Lakota? Are there any Native American languages that are easier to learn? I'm intrigued my them, but know very little about them. And don't tell me one language is easier than another, because that is utter bullcrap. :lol:


You can't deny that Spanish is easier to learn than Finnish!

Anyway, I think Lakota, Cherokee, or Navajo are your best bets. Those are the ones with the most resources. Navajo is tonal, so that might put it out of the running. I do know that Cherokee is a lot easier to pronounce, however it does have a strongly agglutinative grammar. Lakota on the other hand doesn't seem to be too hard as far as grammar goes, but it's harder to pronounce.

Also, looking at numbers:
Cherokee: 15-22,000 speakers
Navajo: 178,000 speakers
Lakota: 8-9,000 speakers

Navajo is going to be easiest to find resources on now that I look at it. I might consider learning it myself!

Oh, wait. I just looked at your profile. You live in Oregon. Eh, I'm not sure which one would be better. I think they would all be equally hard to find resources on. Navajo is spoken in New Mexico, and somewhat in Arizona. Cherokee is spoken in Oklahoma and North Carolina (although I think the most productive dialect is the Oklahoman one), and Lakota is spoken in N./S. Dakota.
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Re: Language Course

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2008-11-19, 17:35

So it looks like Cherokee or Lakota, as tones are VERY confusing to me and I have no idea how they work. And what? I live in Washington, not Oregon. :P
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Re: Language Course

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-11-19, 19:16

sjheiss wrote:So it looks like Cherokee or Lakota, as tones are VERY confusing to me and I have no idea how they work. And what? I live in Washington, not Oregon. :P


Lol. I swear it said Oregon. Oh well.
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Re: Language Course

Postby Formiko » 2008-12-06, 3:49

sjheiss wrote:So it looks like Cherokee or Lakota, as tones are VERY confusing to me and I have no idea how they work. And what? I live in Washington, not Oregon. :P


I know enough Navajo to get into a fight :) Navajo doesn't have tone in the traditional sense.It's more of a stress, to differentiate between two similar words. Honestly, in the years I have been doing research on Navajo, tones were never an issue.
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Re: Language Course

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2008-12-06, 5:12

So you mean like "CONtract" (the noun), and "conTRACT" (the verb) are stressed differently and mean different things?
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Re: Language Course

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-12-06, 5:31

sjheiss wrote:So you mean like "CONtract" (the noun), and "conTRACT" (the verb) are stressed differently and mean different things?


Kinda. It uses register, while Mandarin (for example) uses contour tone.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tone_(linguistics)#Register_tones_and_contour_tones
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Re: Language Course

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2008-12-06, 6:03

ILuvEire wrote:
sjheiss wrote:So you mean like "CONtract" (the noun), and "conTRACT" (the verb) are stressed differently and mean different things?


Kinda. It uses register, while Mandarin (for example) uses contour tone.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tone_(linguistics)#Register_tones_and_contour_tones


Ah, ok, I understand. ^_^
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Re: Language Course

Postby Meera » 2009-09-18, 4:26

Woah Lakota is soo cool! :D

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Postby Struthiomimus » 2010-02-14, 0:11

Aleco wrote:My dictionary says that the verb "to be" i ony used for adjectives (++), but for nouns they conjugate nouns :? How do you do that?


A bit after the fact, but I was reading about this the other day and nouns can be treated as stative verbs, so nouns can be "conjugated" like:

Šúŋkapi = They are dogs

Wíčháša = He’s a man.
Wimáčhaša = I am a man
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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby Kaylee » 2011-04-17, 17:51

I hope I can still take the exercises. :blush: Its a language I have wanted to know since I was 9. :)

Exercise 1:

    1. Waŋblí kiŋ ská
    2. Hokšíla kiŋ tókeca

    3. Hokšíla tókeca kiŋ
    4. Wicíŋcala cíkala kiŋ
    5. Wówapi sápa kiŋ


Exercise 2:

    1. The man is big
    2. The thin woman

    3. The dog is dirty
    4. The strange friend

@Challenge: (Hogáŋ tókeca kiŋ táŋka )
I don't think it says what the challenge lists below it, because the adjective lists "táŋka" as "big" not "white" and white is listed as "ská", so here is what I got: (though I'm probably wrong about them *sigh*)

"The strange fish is big"
Other wise, if the words were listed differently, it is "The strange fish is white".


(Oh, and I'm not sure if its much help, but I have a book with Lakota words and sentences in them, if you'd like me to post them. :oops: )
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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby księżycowy » 2011-04-17, 18:40

Kaylee wrote:I hope I can still take the exercises. :blush: Its a language I have wanted to know since I was 9. :)

I don't see why not. The course is here for anyone to use anytime.

(Oh, and I'm not sure if its much help, but I have a book with Lakota words and sentences in them, if you'd like me to post them. :oops: )

What's it called?
Is is a phrasebook or the like?

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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby Kaylee » 2011-04-17, 19:02

Its not a dictionary or a phrasebook, but a retelling of the story of the Mahto band called "Hanta Yo: An American Saga". It is based on a document recorded on tanned hide by a member of the Mahto Band of the Teton Sioux at the time of the late 1700s to the 1800s; before any contact of the white man or any of the influences of them.
In the back of the book, it has many pages on pronunciation, the sounds, phrases, sentences and words.

For example (not sure if it was talked about yet as I just started reading the thread) it talks about: the suffix "-win" makes a word or phrase feminine, like "Napewastewin" which means "good-hands woman"
And the suffix "-pi' " makes a word or phrase, plural. "Olepi" which means "they seek him".
The prefix "o-" indicates the chief or principal example of anything-- "Odakotah, which means "the real Dakotah", he parent tribe; Otancan, which means "the most".

For words and sentences, there are a lot of them. For example:
"Ah-ah" -- child's term for "sh! listen"
Ahte (ah-tay) -- father
Ahpe -- (ah-pay) -- wait
Ake iyayapi -- again they go
Blotahunka (blo-TAH-hoon-KAH) -- advisers to a large war party
Canozake (chun-OH-zhah-kay) -- fork in a tree
Hehakapa -- elk's head
(lots more, just what was on the first page xD)

Some of the words I couldn't write as it is in the book. Here's what it says about vowels and constants:

Vowels:

In general the vowels in Dakotah/Lakotah have their continental values--that is, roughly: "a" as in English "far" or "arm", "e" as in obey or bet, "i" as in "machine" or "pit", "o" as in "hope" and "u" as in "rule" or "put".

There is more about vowels, but the main topic pretty much says much of it, except the book talks about the consonants differently...
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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby księżycowy » 2011-04-17, 19:10

Fascinating. So is the book in English or Lakhota? I'm guessing English.
If it's only a section of the book your posting I don't see anything wrong with it, but still we just have to be sure, with those pesky copyrights and all.

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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby Kaylee » 2011-04-17, 19:24

Its in English, though I've been told there is a version of the book (rare) that is written entirely in the language, but I haven't seen that yet. My copy is really old. My mother gave it to me a few years ago (she got it in 1989/90).

I'm sure I can post the glossary of Lakotah words (as its been posted over and over again but not fully, on other sites. Plus, they are just words :P), and I would, but a lot of them have emphatic sounds indicated by a dot after the consonant in the respelling, like "Wakicun" and "Wanapin". And I wouldn't want to misspell their respelling. But I can put together a document with all the words and then upload here if you guys would want me to xD

The dot, if I am not clear (which I almost always am), looks like so: "Ċ" but the dot appears underneath the letter, even for the "p"


Lesson 3:
1. itáŋcaŋ unpi
2. itáŋcaŋ unpi šni
3. heyóka tókeca waun kte
4. wakpá kiŋ bláha šni
5. Wicáša kiŋ ksápa kte šni
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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby księżycowy » 2011-04-17, 19:43

Kaylee wrote:I'm sure I can post the glossary of Lakotah words (as its been posted over and over again but not fully, on other sites. Plus, they are just words :P)

Indeed. The words/sentences themselves are not under copyright, only the presentation of them is.
and I would, but a lot of them have emphatic sounds indicated by a dot after the consonant in the respelling, like "Wakicun" and "Wanapin". And I wouldn't want to misspell their respelling. But I can put together a document with all the words and then upload here if you guys would want me to xD

The dot, if I am not clear (which I almost always am), looks like so: "Ċ" but the dot appears underneath the letter, even for the "p"

Must be using an old spelling. There are quite a few different spelling systems for Lakhota/Dakhota.

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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby Kaylee » 2011-04-17, 20:17

I can start the list anytime. I would just need to know what to do with it after. Send it to someone, or post it? If I were to post it, it would be incredibly huge. Its 7 pages (maybe 8) full of words.

Yea, that must be it. The book is really old, and the man who prepared (Chunksa Yuha) the glossary was old around the time as well. He said the men of the old (were in the tribes) had taught him the songs, ceremonies, words of 200 years passed.

I need to re-read " Lesson 4: Stative Verbs (things start to get tough) " a few more times, a bit confusing xD
Last edited by Kaylee on 2011-04-17, 21:13, edited 2 times in total.
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Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!


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