Lakota Language Course

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księżycowy
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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby księżycowy » 2011-04-17, 20:32

Kaylee wrote:I can start the list anytime. I would just need to know what to do with it after. Send it to someone, or post it? If I were to post it, it would be incredibly huge. Its 7 pages (maybe 8) full of words.

You can either make a new thread in the NAIL forum, or use one of the existing Lakhota threads. Which ever you feel more appropriate. :wink:

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Kaylee
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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby Kaylee » 2011-04-17, 21:24

@Lesson 4: Stative Verbs (things start to get tough):

Hm, I don't think I understand stative verbs and conjugating the inside of the words. In this sentence:

Hokšíla kiŋ waštépi kte, naíŋš iyómakiphi kte šni = The children will be good, or I will not be happy.

What is the stative verb? Each is colored, but I'm not sure which color means it is a stative verb?

@księżycowy:
Would posting it in this thread be suitable? Posting it there would be great as to not confuse people looking for a thread for it, and not having to look at four-five different threads...
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby księżycowy » 2011-04-17, 21:38

Kaylee wrote:Would posting it in this thread be suitable? Posting it there would be great as to not confuse people looking for a thread for it, and not having to look at four-five different threads...

Sounds good to me.

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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby Kaylee » 2011-04-21, 6:43

@Lesson 4: Stative Verbs (things start to get tough):

I think I understand now. So "ma" must come after "i" if the sentence starts with "i?" Or is this only once for "ipuza"? :|

Exercise 1:
1. A; heyóka kiŋ tókecapi
2. B; mawašté
3. B; Waŋblí kiŋ táŋka (Confused me a bit, as there were two words listed as 'eagle'...)
4. A; Waŋblí ská kiŋ cíkala šni (Why is "ská" in there? The translation doesn't say white, it says big T.T)
5. A; ínipuzapi

Exercise 2:
1. B; The boys are not good
2. A; We are women
3. A; You (pl) won't be fat
4. B; The big dog is not dirty

Challenge:
5. C; The clown will not be strange
Native American inspired Conlang!
Kaylee - NAILC - Lakȟotiyapi
Learning:lkt (lkt) Next: ru (ru) af (af) bo (bo) ar (ar) cy (cy)/gd (gd)

Thanks to hashi, ronin319, razlem, johntm, Lenguas, jake12,Milya0 and YngNghymru for literally teaching me from nothing, to something big! Thank you guys so much!

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Re: Lakota Language Course

Postby Wiolowan » 2011-05-01, 11:40

Kaylee wrote:I think I understand now. So "ma" must come after "i" if the sentence starts with "i?" Or is this only once for "ipuza"? :|
--"ma" almost always comes after initial vowel,
uŋ(k) usually is prefixed to unaccented vowel and infixed after accented vowel. This is a matter of historical development: í-puza is literally "mouth-dry", so í-ma-puza is "my mouth is dry", similar to natá-ma-yazaŋ, "head-my-aches".

Also, the verb úŋ was translated as a simple equivalent to English "to be". This is not so: úŋ with a noun means "to be located somewhere".
There are two other verbs, roughly translated as "to be a..." (héčha) and "to be the..." (é).
"She is a woman" is wíŋyaŋ héčha .

Also, transcription used in these lessons lacks consistent marking of aspiration and glottalization of consonants.
P, t, k consonant stops have four series:
1. Plain, unaspirated voiceless stops: p, t, k, sometimes perceived as voiced b, d, g (because English p, t, k are always aspirated word-initially, as in pack, take, kite.
Examples: pápa, táku, kú
2. Weakly (pharyngeal) aspirated: ph, th, kh: philámayaye, thípi, khúže
3. Strongly (uvular) aspirated: pȟ, tȟ, kȟ: pȟóǧe, tȟakȟólaku, tȟuŋkášila
Aspiration bears meaning: compare
wápaha "war-standard, flag"
wapȟáha, "war bonnet"
tȟóka, "enemy"
tókȟa, "something happened"
4. Glottalized stops: p’, t’, k’: wanáp’iŋ, t’ékuŋze, ok’ó

č sound has all forms except strongly aspirated: č, čh, č’

aŋ, iŋ, uŋ are actually nasalized a, i, u, /ą, į, ᶙ/ besides, all a,i,u are nasalized after m- and n-.


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