Half-year TAC 2020 - dEhiN

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dEhiN
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Re: Half-year TAC 2020 - dEhiN

Postby dEhiN » 2020-07-18, 2:22

I'm going to finally have a Tamil lesson tonight! Yay! Currently, I'm listening to Súbeme la radio by Enrique Iglesias on repeat. I've been listening to Spanish songs quite a bit lately whenever I'm driving. (Because of COVID and the potential health risks, I've been mostly staying at home, but every so often I'll take a drive to get out of the house). I've been using Amazon Music and really just putting on the radio function for Luís Fonsi, which sometimes gives me Spanglish pop, but I also get some actual Spanish songs. Anyway, this song came up tonight and fortunately Amazon's X-Lyrics service had the lyrics which sparked my interest in learning some Spanish. So, based on looking up the words in the chorus that I didn't know, I'm going to try my own translation of the chorus (without looking up a translation):

(es) Súbeme la radio que esta es mi canción
(es) Siente el bajo que va subiendo
(es) Tráeme el alcohol que quita el dolor
(es) Hoy vamos a juntar la luna y el sol

(en) Turn up the radio, this is my song
(en) Feel the bass that's coming
(en) Give me alcohol to take away the pain
(en) Today, let's join the moon and the sun

If that's correct, then I understand the last line as basically saying, "let's go all night (until the sun comes up)".
(en-ca) (fr) (ta-lk)

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Re: Half-year TAC 2020 - dEhiN

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-07-18, 4:35

dEhiN wrote:I was thinking about this the other day with French: the difference between using a foreign word when speaking another language because I know that's the translation of the English word I'd use in that context, versus using it because I implicitly know that word conveys the correct mental sense I'd like to express. (I'm sure there's a much more elegant linguistic way of saying that, but I can't think of the linguistic term for mental sense!)

Can't say if there's an elegant term, but I think I'd call the former level "translating from English." For me, that phrase means a learner is still fundamentally thinking in English and then turning those thoughts into speech in the target language. Once you gain a more intuitive grasp of the language, you can start forming utterances without having to first figure out what you'd say in English.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: Half-year TAC 2020 - dEhiN

Postby Car » 2020-07-19, 21:43

dEhiN wrote:
Car wrote:Yes. I mean just look at all the possible translations here.

I'm curious: even though there are several possible translations into English, for a German speaker, does bis convey one sense or idea mentally? Or is it similar to a word like get for English speakers, where it's not just used in varied contexts but each use conveys a different sense mentally?

I've never thought about it, so I'm not sure, but I think it's one idea (not talking about the music sense as that's a Latin loan that just happens to be spelt/ pronounced the same).
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: Half-year TAC 2020 - dEhiN

Postby dEhiN » 2020-07-20, 2:34

Dormouse559 wrote:
dEhiN wrote:I was thinking about this the other day with French: the difference between using a foreign word when speaking another language because I know that's the translation of the English word I'd use in that context, versus using it because I implicitly know that word conveys the correct mental sense I'd like to express. (I'm sure there's a much more elegant linguistic way of saying that, but I can't think of the linguistic term for mental sense!)

Can't say if there's an elegant term, but I think I'd call the former level "translating from English." For me, that phrase means a learner is still fundamentally thinking in English and then turning those thoughts into speech in the target language. Once you gain a more intuitive grasp of the language, you can start forming utterances without having to first figure out what you'd say in English.

Merci! I think for me, the annoying phase in language learning is the mixed phase - where I'm translating from English for some sentences or even words in a sentence but also have that intuitive grasp in other areas.
(en-ca) (fr) (ta-lk)


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