dEhiN's Language Log

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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-04, 3:33

Diolch!
N: (en-ca)
B1: (fr)
A1: (pt-br) (es) ((ta-lk))
A0: (gl) (cy) ((sv) (ro))
Brackets indicate no active study

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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-02-04, 6:00

dEhiN wrote:French (fr) French
Le temps de mise à jour:

Depuis quelques Ces derniers jours*, j'ai pas beaucoup étudié les langues. Comme je l'ai déjà écrit, j'ai étudie plus le galicien il y a deux ou trois jours. Malheureusement, je ne me souviens de rien sauf les salutations et spécifiquement:

  • bos días (/bos d̪iɐs/) qui signifie bonjour
  • boas tardes (/boas t̪aɾðes/) qui signifie bonne après-midi
  • boas noites (/boas n̪oit̪es/) qui signifie les deux bonsoir et bonne nuit
Heureusement, j'ai passé beaucoup de temps à en étudier l'alphabet et la phonologie, alors je peux lire un peu le galicien. J'ai aussi trouvé aussi plusieurs de ressources avec des leçons ou des dictionnaires. Deux exemples que je veux partager sont cela - une dictionnaire avec la prononciation des mots et leur transcription API, et celui ceci - une ressource avec 125 leçons.

Aujourd'hui, j'ai pris suivi l'exemple de lingouboy en m'abandonnant à mon envie d'apprendre le gallois. J'ai utilisé Duolingo et j'ai atteint le premier niveau du première don. J'ai appris (ou, en fait, ré-appris):

  • bore da /bɔrɛ daː/ qui signifie bonjour
  • prynhawn da /prɨnhaun daː/ qui signifie bonne après-midi
  • croeso /krɔɨsɔ/ qui signifie bienvenue
  • hwyl /hu:ɨl/ qui signifie au revoir selon Duolingo mais pas selon Wiktionnaire d'anglais
  • dw i /du i/ ou /dwi/ qui signifie je suis
C'était amusant pour moi de commencer à-apprendre le gallois une autre fois. Mais, j'aurais dit que le <r> en gallois ressemble à /ɾ/ même si Wiktionnaire utilise /r/. Pour maintenant le moment, je pense que je vais continuer avec le gallois et le galicien quand j'ai besoin d'une pause de dans mes courses en ligne.

*for the past few days = depuis quelques jours?

Il y a quelques locutions dans ce post qui, à mon avis, devraient être modifiées, mais je ne suis pas certain de la meilleure façon de les corriger. Je donne quelques idées ci-dessous.

Le temps de mise à jour - « C'est l'heure de la mise à jour. » ?

j'ai étudie plus le galicien - « je me suis concentré sur le galicien » ?

première don - Il me semble que tu voulais traduire skill, mais dans ce contexte, skill est un terme propre à la structure des cours Duolingo. Je suggérerais de chercher la traduction qu'utilise Duolingo sur son interface française. Aussi, étant donné que don est masculin, on écrirait plutôt premier don.

une autre fois - Cette locution se traduit en anglais par another time / some other time. Pour dire again, on peut dire « de nouveau » ou « à nouveau ». Mais dans ta phrase tu as déjà dit « réapprendre », qui communique la même idée. Alors l'adverbe est redondant, à moins que ça ne représente pas la première fois que tu laisses tomber le gallois et que tu le reprends.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-04, 10:24

Merci Dormouse pour les corrections! Je vais te répondre dans le futur, mais maintenant je suis trop fatigué.

In other news, I decided to add Galician and Welsh to my list of A0 languages! I also basically took the "inactive study brackets" (in my signature) away from Spanish. I'm not going to really actively study Spanish for the foreseeable future. But, I came across this YT video in Galician: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rut8cdVXmag

I was able to understand quite a few words and the general gist in part thanks to my passive knowledge of Spanish and Portuguese. As such, I realized that by learning Galician, I'm in one sense resurrecting and also possibly improving my Spanish.

ETA: So, I did some digging to figure out what digocho eu means, and it's basically "I tell/say it to you". Galician likes to compound prepositions with articles as well as dative pronouns with succeeding accusative pronouns. In this case, che is the 2nd sing. dat. while o is the 3rd. masc. sing. acc., and when the two combine, you get cho. Galician also tends to follow suit with Brazilian Portuguese* and affix object pronouns to finite verb forms, so digo "I say/tell" plus cho gives us digocho. (I'm not sure why the acute accent is used in the hash tag for digo.) And eu is jus the 1st sing. nom.

*I actually find it amusing that Galician does the same as PT-BR, considering PT-PT uses an object pronoun construction more like French or Spanish. Perhaps this means Old Portuguese used the affix construction, which then got cemented into PT-BR while PT-PT changed from Castilian influence?

ETA 2: I created a Galician thread in the Other Languages forum
N: (en-ca)
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby Car » 2021-02-04, 10:47

linguoboy wrote:I've probably posted this before, but I once met an East Frisian who told me about going on a school trip in the Black Forest where they were paired with a local school group and they such difficulty understanding each other that each group thought the other was taking the piss.

I sometimes feel like learners have fewer difficulties than natives in some ways because we're much more used to struggling to puzzle out what someone is saying so encountering a new accent maybe doesn't phase us as much.

Or maybe learners are just more willing, too. If you usually don't have to make an effort, it's annoying if all of a sudden, you do. Depending on where you live, you're not likely to hear much variation - with the exception of non-natives, maybe, so that makes it harder.
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-05, 21:52

Update time (this one I'm just going to do in English):

Last night, I did some Galician. I initially started by reading through Curso de lingua galega "Galician language course" on Galician Wikibooks. It's all in Galician, but I thought it might be fun to practice and possibly improve my Portuguese and Spanish at the same time (which I'll refer to as P/S from hereon in). I started with the course page, Catro normas para falar e escribir "Four rules for speaking and writing", which really only contains three rules (or eight if you count all the subsections separately)! :? At the same, I used the Galician Omniglot page to learn the letter names of the alphabet and the Galician phonology page on Wikipedia to read up on Galician pronunciation and sounds. Finally, I listened to a YouTube video by the channel Langfocus on comparing Galician and Portuguese. It's basically in English with the host first explaining the history of Galician-Portuguese, then playing short audio samples in both Galician and European Portuguese for comparison of the sounds, and finally getting into various phonological and grammatical differences between the languages. It seems that the host actually found native Galician and European Portuguese speakers. The Galician audio sample is from about 2:57 to 3:15.

For the "Four rules" page, I read through the first rule and the first subsection of the second rule. I had to use Wiktionary to look up some words, but a good amount of them I got from P/S. After reading both the Omniglot page and the Galician phonology page, I tried to read the rules as best as I could in a native way. The biggest challenge I found was with Galician unstressed vowels, which change from close-mid to open-mid. I found it difficult to remember that fact, firstly, and, secondly, to know which words definitely contained unstressed final vowels. I think when I started learning Galician, the information I read was a lot less technical and so basically taught only the open-mid version of the vowels. So, I thought Galician pronunciation was similar to Spanish in that every vowel, in all positions, was pronounced the same. (This may not be true of actual spoken Spanish dialects, but my understanding is that standard Spanish [whatever that means!] is pronounced this way.) The second biggest challenge I found was remembering that Galician <v> is pronounced /b/ and usually more accurately, [β], at least word-medially. Again, that's the same as in Spanish essentially, but I think for a lot of words that had <v>, I saw more of a relationship to Portuguese and so thought of /v/. It's funny, I was able to remember fairly well that word-final <n> (and sometimes <m>?) as well as the digraph <nh> get pronounced as [ŋ], even though that's unique to Galician (compared to P/S).

I'm going to take a break from this update for now. However, I want to try and translate what I read from the "Four rules" page as well as write out (and translate) what I could understand from the Galician audio sample. It did take me several listens and even then I didn't get everything. But I'm proud of myself for being able to grasp most of the first part as well as being able to use my knowledge of Galician orthography to look up on Wiktionary the words I heard but didn't know the meaning of.
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-06, 1:17

Update time continued:

I'm so excited! I created a Galician thread in the Other Languages forum a few days ago, and Saim responded, in Galician! I'm not aware of any other Unilanger who currently knows Galician, but I know Saim has studied it and I imagine is at a fairly decent level. (Well, at least at a level high enough to help a complete beginner like me! :D) I responded to his post in Galician as well. It took some work as I had to use a mix of the Galician language pronunciation dictionary, Wiktionary, Google Translate and the Real Galician Academy dictionary. Fortunately, I could already guess the most likely forms of the words I wanted to use based on the equivalents in Portuguese combined with the orthographical and phonological differences between the two languages. I used Google Translate mostly as a bilingual dictionary from either Portuguese to Galician or English to Galician, since unfortunately none of the other 3 sources can act as a bilingual dictionary into Galician. (Oh wait, I just had an idea! I totally should try using Galician Wiktionary for any English words!) I did look up on GT escribín algunhas publicacións to confirm my suspicions for how to say that and also hai algún dias because I don't think I could say that in Portuguese or Spanish either!

Anyway, I'm going to post here what Saim wrote and what I responded with, as well as a translation of both. I'll include them in spoil tags for decluttering purposes.
► Show Spoiler

Once again, I'm so happy with my progress!! :mrgreen: :partyhat: :partyhat:
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby Saim » 2021-02-06, 1:29

dEhiN wrote:As such, I realized that by learning Galician, I'm in one sense resurrecting and also possibly improving my Spanish.


É, malia que a gramática e léxico básico/máis antigo é máis semellante ao portugués, a meirande parte dos fraseoloxismos e neoloxismos é idéntica aos do castelán.

ETA: So, I did some digging to figure out what digocho eu means, and it's basically "I tell/say it to you".


Diría que o equivalente en castelán é: ¡ya te digo!

*I actually find it amusing that Galician does the same as PT-BR, considering PT-PT uses an object pronoun construction more like French or Spanish. Perhaps this means Old Portuguese used the affix construction, which then got cemented into PT-BR while PT-PT changed from Castilian influence?

ETA 2: I created a Galician thread in the Other Languages forum


Are you sure it's similar to Brazilian Portuguese in this regard? Brazilian Portuguese does often put the object after the verb, but this is an independent word identical to the subject form of the pronoun (eu amo você), whereas the object forms generally go before the verb. Generally it doesn't do much "ênclise" compared to Iberian Portuguese (it prefers eu te amo over the more Iberian amo-te, although of course eu amo você is also possible).

dEhiN wrote:but I know Saim has studied it and I imagine is at a fairly decent level. (Well, at least at a level high enough to help a complete beginner like me! :D)


I've been studying on-and-off for many years. I've hardly had any speaking practice but I'd say I'm pretty decent at writing it, and I've listened and read quite a lot.

Once again, I'm so happy with my progress!! :mrgreen: :partyhat: :partyhat:


Parabéns!

dEhiN wrote:Finally, I listened to a YouTube video by the channel Langfocus on comparing Galician and Portuguese. It's basically in English with the host first explaining the history of Galician-Portuguese, then playing short audio samples in both Galician and European Portuguese for comparison of the sounds, and finally getting into various phonological and grammatical differences between the languages. It seems that the host actually found native Galician and European Portuguese speakers. The Galician audio sample is from about 2:57 to 3:15.


Keep in mind that this video has a couple of errors. I wrote a comment about this a while ago:

  1. He's confusing natural dialects with a different writing convention. There is a political current in Galicia that advocates using more Portuguese-style spelling, with the goal of making political reality the idea of Galician-Portuguese a single pluricentric language. Crucially, these changes in spelling don't effect the pronunciation. Paul erroneously marked these as "dialectal" forms, when they're just different ways of spelling the same forms. Unfortunately the speaker he used for the recordings seem to not be aware of this either, pronouncing "milhom/milhoms", "nengum/nengumha" and "um/umha" with /m/; they're still supposed to be pronounced with a velar nasal.
  2. Not all varieties of Galician have /θ/. In Western Galicia it's quite common to not have /θ/ at all (seseo), or to have /θ/ realised as [s] in final position (seseo implosivo).
  3. The pronoun "tu" also exists as a variant of "ti" in Galician. "Tu" actually takes up a larger part of the Galician language area than "ti", covering large parts of eastern and southern Galicia, as well as the Galician-speaking parts of Asturias and León/Zamora.
  4. When discussing the pluscuamperfect the speaker says "chegará" (which is a future form) rather than "chegara", which is stressed on the second-to-last syllable. This is quite strange given that in spoken Galician there's a tendency towards using the form "vai chegar" rather than "chegará", and the pluscuamperfect forms are also very common.

The biggest challenge I found was with Galician unstressed vowels, which change from close-mid to open-mid. I found it difficult to remember that fact, firstly, and, secondly, to know which words definitely contained unstressed final vowels.


Keep in mind that the "unstressed" forms only appear in final unstressed position, and due to Spanish influence many speakers don't do that either. Luckily, the girl who does Dígocho eu pronounces the unstressed vowels very consistently, so she could be a good source for how to pronounce them.

So we have words like:

pequeno - pekenʊ (not pɪkenʊ)
importante - importantɪ (not ɪmpʊrtantɪ)

Again, that's the same as in Spanish essentially, but I think for a lot of words that had <v>, I saw more of a relationship to Portuguese and so thought of /v/.


Yes, I'm not aware of any Galician dialects that maintain /v/. In fact, betacism traditionally extends into parts of northern Portugal.

It's funny, I was able to remember fairly well that word-final <n> (and sometimes <m>?) as well as the digraph <nh> get pronounced as [ŋ], even though that's unique to Galician (compared to P/S).


This happens in lots of Spanish accents as well, notably in the Spanish of Galicia and Asturias, as well as in parts of Latin America.

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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-06, 22:12

Saim wrote:Parabéns!

Graciñas moito! E tamén grazas polas correccións e as explicacións. Quero responderche pero farei máis tarde.

I was thinking last night about implementing some sort of organizational system for my updates, so it's easier to see at a glance which language I'm referring to when I share recent-past learning activities. I especially want to do this because now I have several on here who are graciously donating their time to offering me corrections and help in my languages. I think what I'll do is display the flag of the language I'm updating and, to accommodate for when I try to write an update in another language, the flag of whatever language I'm writing in with a forward slash in-between. Additionally, if I'm just writing a post in another language, but it's not an update post, I'll display the flag of that language. So, for example:

(en-ca) / (fr) - This would mean an update in English on my French studies.
(fr) / (cy) - This would mean an update in French on my Welsh studies.
(pt-br) - This would just mean a post in Brazilian Portuguese.

That will hopefully let anyone who's only interested in one or some specific languages but not all to skip posts about what they're not interested in.
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-06, 22:21

(en-ca) / (cy) - Ok, so now that I got some organizational stuff out of the way, I think it's time I write a quick Welsh update. I tried to a little more Welsh last night on Duolingo. I basically just did the first skill again, but took it up to Level 3. In the tips for the first skill, they recommend listening to the following YouTube playlist from a channel called "Welsh Plus - Learn Welsh With Us":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16sqX2Baprg&list=PLz6oFM0_IszwxmU7dMcGQClZ5zMwX2EdY
The playlist is a set of videos on Welsh pronunciation. Of course, Duolingo uses NLP for their Welsh audio which, while giving a good approximation of Welsh pronunciation, isn't the best source for learning the phonology. I plan to go through that playlist before I continue with the second skill; especially since the tips for the second skill also recommend going through those videos!
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A0: (gl) (cy) ((sv) (ro))
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-06, 22:33

(en-ca) / (gl) - I completely forgot I also wanted to write a quick update for Galician! Anyway, I've been considering using Anki and creating a Galician deck. I'm a little hesitant to use Anki since I stopped it 2-3 years ago because it had gotten overwhelming. I was remembering the cards fairly well, but only in the context of an Anki review. So, the benefit Anki reviews were supposed to bring - remembering hard vocabulary in active production - wasn't happening anymore.

However, the past few posts I've written on here in Galician (whether on my log or the Galician thread) have been time consuming and brain intensive. I think that's because I was looking up almost every single word (using the four resources I mentioned previously) to confirm either the spelling of a word, the conjugated form of a verb for a particular tense, or the Galician equivalent of a short clause in English. I'm either trying too intensively with Galician or I need to start using Anki to help me remember words, forms and grammar points I've already encountered. I don't feel like I'm trying too intensively though since I still am enjoying writing and reading in Galician.

One solution I thought of, if I use Anki again, for how to ensure I don't get overwhelmed is to take words/cards out of circulation once I feel like I've got a good grasp on things. This will also help keep the deck manageable as I add new cards. Since I'm starting in Galician, I can write pretty much any word I'm struggling to remember (no matter how basic the word is) as an Anki card. Then, after I've seen the card several times and I feel like I no longer struggle to remember the word, I can retire the card.
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby linguoboy » 2021-02-06, 23:37

dEhiN wrote:In the tips for the first skill, they recommend listening to the following YouTube playlist from a channel called "Welsh Plus - Learn Welsh With Us"

What a cute little series of videos!

Listening to it, I wonder if [r] vs [ɾ] could be a North-South difference. It certainly sounds to me like Lori is consistently doing a trill whereas Gareth generally flaps except in word-initial position.
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-07, 1:31

linguoboy wrote:
dEhiN wrote:In the tips for the first skill, they recommend listening to the following YouTube playlist from a channel called "Welsh Plus - Learn Welsh With Us"

What a cute little series of videos!

I'll take your word for it! :D

linguoboy wrote:Listening to it, I wonder if [r] vs [ɾ] could be a North-South difference. It certainly sounds to me like Lori is consistently doing a trill whereas Gareth generally flaps except in word-initial position.

Perhaps, although it looks like Wikipedia doesn't display any difference in the North-South pronunciations for rhotics. Confer bore or pryd.

(fr) Est-ce que c'est correct: je veux un café glacé moyen tellement sucré, un bagel à la cannelle et raisin sec avec fromage frais à tartiner, et deux beignes à la crème sure glacée. J'essaie à dire « I want a medium iced coffee extra sweet, a cinnamon raisin bagel with cream cheese and two sour cream glazed donuts ». Je le demande parce que je viens de parler en français avec ma copine de notre commande pour un "Tim's run"* et je voulais répéter sa commande.

*Tim Hortons est une chaîne de café au Canada et "Tim's run" signifie une excursion au là.
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby Saim » 2021-02-07, 1:44

dEhiN wrote:
Saim wrote:Parabéns!

(Moitas) graciñas! E tamén grazas polas correccións e as explicacións. Quero responderche pero o farei máis tarde.


De nada. :)

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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby linguoboy » 2021-02-07, 2:30

dEhiN wrote:Perhaps, although it looks like Wikipedia doesn't display any difference in the North-South pronunciations for rhotics. Confer bore or pryd.

So "North-South" is a vast oversimplification of the dialect diversity of Wales. Gareth is specifically from southeast Wales while Lori is from the northwest. Despite being so distant from each other, they actually share some nonstandard innovative features like /e/ > /a/ in final syllables. Sometimes something can be a "North-South difference" without being common to all the North or all the South. So what I'm really wondering is if [ɾ] is common in parts of the South. (Also, I don't totally trust Wiktionary pronunciations for phonetic details. Most of the Catalan pronunciations, for instance, are generated from the standard spelling via a template and so vastly simplify the real dialectal variation in modern Catalan.)
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-07, 3:28

linguoboy wrote:(Also, I don't totally trust Wiktionary pronunciations for phonetic details. Most of the Catalan pronunciations, for instance, are generated from the standard spelling via a template and so vastly simplify the real dialectal variation in modern Catalan.)

Yeah I can understand; all of the Wikimedia projects, while full of fairly decent information, should be taken with a grain of salt. I feel like, apart from English words, the English Wiktionary doesn't do a good job representing dialectal pronunciation, that is, if they even have the pronunciation at all! I've been considering using that Galician pronunciation dictionary to fill in IPA pronunciations for the various Galician words on the English Wiktionary.

The thing though is that I imagine this dictionary only gives standard pronunciations. They also seem to only have the head of a grouping of words. (It's been a while since I took intro to linguistics, so forgive my lack of recall, but I think the word I'm looking might be lemma? Basically the morphological (or maybe lexical?) analysis of words into groupings based on free and bound morphemes.)

So, for example, they'll have can /kaŋ/, which means "dog", but not cans /kaŋs/. I guess in the case of plurals, it could be that adding an -s doesn't really change the pronunciation drastically. But even with verbs, they only show the infinitive, and not any of the finite forms. This is the part that's most frustrating to me.
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby Dormouse559 » 2021-02-07, 17:47

dEhiN wrote:(fr) Est-ce que c'est correct: je veux un café glacé moyen tellement très sucré, un bagel à la cannelle et au raisin sec avec du fromage frais à tartiner, et deux beignes à la crème sure glacées. J'essaie à de dire « I want a medium iced coffee extra sweet, a cinnamon raisin bagel with cream cheese and two sour cream glazed donuts ». Je le demande pose cette question parce que je viens de parler en français avec ma copine de notre commande pour un "Tim's run"* et que je voulais répéter sa commande.

*Tim Hortons est une chaîne de café au Canada et "Tim's run" signifie une excursion au-bas.

fromage frais à tartiner - Bien que « fromage frais à tartiner » soit utilisé, il me semble que le terme « fromage à la crème » est plus répandu. Wikipédia affirme que ce dernier est la traduction choisie pour décrire Philadelphia, au Canada et en France.

beignes … glacé(e)s - Comme référence à une pâte frite, « beigne » est généralement masculin, mais Wiktionnaire conseille que c'est féminin dans certaines régions.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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linguoboy
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby linguoboy » 2021-02-07, 18:46

dEhiN wrote:The thing though is that I imagine this dictionary only gives standard pronunciations. They also seem to only have the head of a grouping of words. (It's been a while since I took intro to linguistics, so forgive my lack of recall, but I think the word I'm looking might be lemma? Basically the morphological (or maybe lexical?) analysis of words into groupings based on free and bound morphemes.)

So, for example, they'll have can /kaŋ/, which means "dog", but not cans /kaŋs/. I guess in the case of plurals, it could be that adding an -s doesn't really change the pronunciation drastically. But even with verbs, they only show the infinitive, and not any of the finite forms. This is the part that's most frustrating to me.

So, as conceived, the Wiktionary project does allow for the listing of all inflected forms of a particular lexeme. Take a look, for instance, at: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cans#Catalan. It's just that creating these entries is not automated (at least, if there is a tool that can do this, I haven't found it) and creating them manually is a chore, so not all forms will be listed for all lexemes, even if the headword entries are very complete (as they typically are for Galician). If you want to help improve Wiktionary, this is an easy thing you can do.
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Saim
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby Saim » 2021-02-07, 21:49

linguoboy wrote:It's just that creating these entries is not automated (at least, if there is a tool that can do this, I haven't found it) and creating them manually is a chore, so not all forms will be listed for all lexemes, even if the headword entries are very complete (as they typically are for Galician).


There at least used to be a bot that would automate articles for Spanish conjugations but other than that there doesn't seem to be much.

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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby dEhiN » 2021-02-07, 23:50

Saim wrote:
linguoboy wrote:It's just that creating these entries is not automated (at least, if there is a tool that can do this, I haven't found it) and creating them manually is a chore, so not all forms will be listed for all lexemes, even if the headword entries are very complete (as they typically are for Galician).


There at least used to be a bot that would automate articles for Spanish conjugations but other than that there doesn't seem to be much.

Well, Wiktionary is apparently having troubles with memory issues. (See the entry for the letter i). If you check out the Grease pit, there's an entry for January 2021 about memory problems. So, it's possible automated things like template filling have been turned off, or reduced.
N: (en-ca)
B1: (fr)
A1: (pt-br) (es) ((ta-lk))
A0: (gl) (cy) ((sv) (ro))
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Re: dEhiN's Language Log

Postby vijayjohn » 2021-02-08, 10:41

Saim Bhai, you're in Brisbane now? (Does this have something to do with COVID?)


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