TAC 2016 - Mike - Turkish, Portuguese

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Michael
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Re: TAC 2016 - Mike (Azerbaijani, Polish)

Postby Michael » 2016-05-01, 18:40

voron wrote:Just kidding; good luck with Sorani. I think you will be able to find enough materials and media to learn it; at least for Kurmanji, there is plenty. The only major problem is that people do not speak the standard language used in books in media.

Were you referring to Kurmanji in the second sentence? While I don't doubt that Sorani also has dialectal variation, Thackston had this to say in the introduction of his Sorani grammar: "While Kurmanji is still far from being a unified, normalized, or standardized language, Sorani has been the second official language of Iraq since the creation of that country after World War I and has many decades of literary activity behind it."
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: TAC 2016 - Mike (Azerbaijani, Polish)

Postby voron » 2016-05-02, 7:20

Yes, I was referring to Kurmanji. As I wrote in my Kurmanji topic under the Kurdish subforum, even the basic vocabulary like to speak or to look is different from the standard in dialects.

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Re: TAC 2016 - Mike (Azerbaijani, Kurdish)

Postby Michael » 2016-05-02, 19:54

18ci (On Səkkizinci) Həftənin Yeniliyi (Week 18 Update)

[flag=]az[/flag] Progress
Öztopçu: I haven't progressed much in Unit 9, but I've at least starting going over the section introducing the +dIQ suffix (non-future/object participle). I'll consider having gone over those two pages a small victory, considering that I haven't even touched this textbook during the last 3 weeks. The thing is, I love Azerbaijani out of all Turkic languages, so I'm still dumbfounded as to how I could have possibly run out of steam for it, but as I said in my last post, I'll make it a priority of mine to at least reach the end of the current unit.

Also, I'm officially adding [flag=]ku[/flag] Sorani Kurdish to my TAC 2016.
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: TAC 2016 - Mike (Azerbaijani, Kurdish)

Postby vijayjohn » 2016-05-02, 20:59

Michael wrote:The thing is, I love Azerbaijani out of all Turkic languages, so I'm still dumbfounded as to how I could have possibly run out of steam for it

Haven't you run into this problem before with other languages you loved learning, too, though?

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Re: TAC 2016 - Mike (Azerbaijani, Kurdish)

Postby voron » 2016-05-03, 6:48

Michael wrote:Also, I'm officially adding [flag=]ku[/flag] Sorani Kurdish to my TAC 2016.

:woohoo: Welcome to the Kurdish world! I'll be waiting for you in the Kurdish subforum!

I won't be able to correct your mistakes in Sorani, but at least I'll be able to comment on its difference or similarity to Kurmanji, and with your help I'll be able to learn some Sorani too.

And as a small teaser I'm adding this song. The text was written by the 17th century Kurmanji poet Faqi Tayran (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faqi_Tayran), and now it's one of the most popular and recognizable Kurmanji Kurdish songs.

Ey Dilberê
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OiyAA7-S5zs

In this video it is performed by Şahe Bedo, a very successful contemporary Kurdish singer.
Lyrics: http://sarkisozleri.kurtcebilgi.com/s/s ... y-dilbere/

The video uses scenes from the film "Yol", a famous film directed by Kurdish director Yılmaz Güney.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yol

I'm still angry with you that you have preferred Sorani over Kurmanji, though. You won't be able to enjoy such grammatic awesomenesses as noun genders and cases. :twisted:

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Michael » 2016-06-07, 1:35

Whew, it's been several weeks since I last posted an update! Time to get back into the game.

Following the majority of your personal language blogs with great interest, I've become inspired to reformat my own blog. I give a lot of credit to Saim and his blog in particular.

I forced myself to focus too much on a particular one or two languages during the first half of this year. However, my linguistic priorities have not been that static, as opportunities have come and gone for me, and I've found it hard to devote an extended amount of time to one language in light of the desire to revisit languages in which I'm out of practice.

Without further ado, here is Week 24 Update. The languages are listed in order of importance, or relevance, from most to least.

Iranian Turkish (az) I've had a lot of fun learning the basics of Azerbaijani—or Iranian Turkish as I like to call it, as it better reflects the language's role in history—but I didn't maintain a consistent rate of study from my workbook, or at the least, I'm 2-3 months behind the original schedule. However, I do feel satiated enough with the progress that I have made in the textbook so far, having reached p. 239/311, the latter part of Unit 9/12. Thus, I now feel confident enough to take a break with written, textbook study and start exposing myself to contemporary Azerbaijani media.

Greek (el) I decided to revisit Greek a little over two months ago in March. I've cast Greek aside for the last 3 years in order to focus on Spanish and Polish, since my skills in those two languages had become rusty to varying degrees, but then I unexpectedly ended up getting into Persian for the majority of that period of time. Nevertheless, Greek used to be my best foreign language in terms of proficiency, more so even than Spanish and Portuguese, and I aim to restore that level of knowledge, improve on it and find more opportunities to put it into practice.

In order to keep things novel and fresh, I've started using the 1976 edition of the Cortina Method Conversational Modern Greek to brush up on my command of basic Greek. What I like about this book is that, since it was published only 6 years before polytonic orthography was banned by official decree, the language taught in the book leans almost entirely to the growing Demotic usage of the time, but sprinkled with a lot of antiquated words that a student of Greek must watch out for and take care to acknowledge.

I may export my Anki deck to Memrise if I encounter enough interest from [potential] students of Modern Greek in learning about the language as it was used between the 1960's and 1982, being sure to mark antiquated words, pronunciations or usages.

[flag=]sq[/flag] I've become very curious about Albanian these last few weeks. I've been frequenting a hair salon mostly manned by Albanians for the last 8 years or so, and their language intrigues me. I'm dabbling in a little bit of Albanian grammar and phrases for the moment, until I can purchase a good Albanian workbook on Amazon. Meanwhile, I've been using what I can find on the Internet.
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Saim » 2016-06-09, 13:15

Michael, why do your signature and profile show such different information? I haven't heard you speak Spanish spontaneously but from what I've seen you write I seriously doubt your level is A1, no matter how rusty it's gotten.

Michael wrote:Iranian Turkish (az) I've had a lot of fun learning the basics of Azerbaijani—or Iranian Turkish as I like to call it, as it better reflects the language's role in history—but I didn't maintain a consistent rate of study from my workbook, or at the least, I'm 2-3 months behind the original schedule.


Yeah, if the textbook has bored you or you find you're not motivated to study it's probably a good idea to switch resources until you're ready to go back to into it. I've gotten bored with ikasten, the online Basque curse I've been using, and I think I might just try and understand texts and then stick some of the more important vocabulary on memrise. Or alternatively get back into Assimil: le Basque sans peine.

Greek (el) I decided to revisit Greek a little over two months ago in March. I've cast Greek aside for the last 3 years in order to focus on Spanish and Polish,


A jak idzie polski? :)

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Michael » 2016-06-13, 23:26

Saim wrote:Michael, why do your signature and profile show such different information? I haven't heard you speak Spanish spontaneously but from what I've seen you write I seriously doubt your level is A1, no matter how rusty it's gotten.

I know that the CEFR thresholds for each star have lowered, but I have frequent gaps in vocabulary in almost all of my languages, even Italian, Spanish and Greek, and I don't think that I should reward myself two stars if I haven't past that borderline-B1 glass ceiling. Having said that, I will simply get with the times and accept the new system. :P

Michael wrote:Yeah, if the textbook has bored you or you find you're not motivated to study it's probably a good idea to switch resources until you're ready to go back to into it. I've gotten bored with ikasten, the online Basque curse I've been using, and I think I might just try and understand texts and then stick some of the more important vocabulary on memrise. Or alternatively get back into Assimil: le Basque sans peine.

I think I'm gonna just go ahead and start studying Turkish itself. It's much easier than Azerbaijani, for one thing. :wink:

A jak idzie polski? :)

Naprawdę, niedobrze. Nawet nie mogę pisać ten wiadomość bez pomocy słownika i tabel przypadków. Jak skończyłem kurs języka polskiego siedem lata temu. zapomniałem się dużo mojej wiedzy.
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Saim » 2016-06-14, 8:10

Michael wrote:(Tak) naprawdę, niedobrze. Nawet nie mogę pisać tej wiadomości bez pomocy słownika i tabely przypadków. Jak skończyłem kurs języka polskiego siedem lat temu, dużo zapomniałem się dużo mojej wiedzy.


-wiadomość is a feminine noun, as is true of all nouns in -ość. Feminine nouns that end in a consonant are declined differently to those that end in a:

to jest wiadomość (N)
nie ma wiadomości (G)
uwierzyłem wiadomości (D)
widzę wiadomość (A)
pod wiadomością (I)
w wiadomości (L)

to jest moc (N)
nie ma mocy (G)
uwierzyłem mocy (D)
widzę moc (A)
pod mocą (I)
w mocy (L)

to jest krew (N)
nie ma krwi (G)
uwierzyłem krwi (D)
widzę krew (A)
pod krwią (I)
we krwi (L)

Luckily this class hass less case suffixes: the genitive, dative and locative are all identical, as are the nominative and accusative. It's also important to note that their agreement with adjectives is unaffected by the fact that they end in a consonant.

-ta wiadomość takes the genitive because this is what happens when you negate a verb that takes an accusative object.

widzę dziewczynę/ nie widzę dziewczyny
widzę jabłko / nie widzę jabłka
widzę chłopaka / nie widzę chłopaka

widzę dziewczyny nie widzę dziewczyn
widzę jabłka / nie widzę jabłek
widzę chłopaków / nie widzę chłopaków

(The e in jabłek is an epenthesis that only occurs when feminine or neuter nouns that end in consonant clusters take the genitive plural, to avoid strings of consonants: okno - dużo okien, skrzydło - dużo skrzydeł, Polka - dużo Polek).

-The noun rok is one of the few Polish words that have fossilised dual forms with the numbers 2-3-4. Its singular and plural forms are derived from different roots. In Russian and Serbo-Croatian, these sorts of forms for 2-3-4 that are similar to the genitive singular occur in all nouns.

1 rok

2 lata
3 lata
4 lata

5 lat
6 lat
7 lat
8 lat
9 lat
10 lat

-Tabela: tabel is genitive plural and tabely is genitive singular.

Mam nadzieję, że ci to pomogło, chociaż wśród języków, których się uczysz, polski nie jest twoim głównym priorytetem.

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Serafín » 2016-06-17, 0:55

Michael wrote:I know that the CEFR thresholds for each star have lowered, but

They have!?

I remember getting very impressed by the ridiculously high threshold of the C2 exam for Catalan... A friend of loqu's took it and he said he was taken aback by all the questions involving medieval Catalan literature! The second time he took the exam he studied his medieval stuff and was better prepared.

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Michael » 2016-06-25, 19:35

Week 26 Update

Albanian (sq) Ever since my Albanian textbook arrived in the mail two weeks ago, I've been scanning the content of the first few 5-6 chapters a couple times over, and am currently completing the first part of Lesson 1. I'm glad I was able to save up for this textbook, Discovering Albanian 1!

Saim wrote:-wiadomość is a feminine noun, as is true of all nouns in -ość. Feminine nouns that end in a consonant are declined differently to those that end in a:

Luckily this class hass less case suffixes: the genitive, dative and locative are all identical, as are the nominative and accusative. It's also important to note that their agreement with adjectives is unaffected by the fact that they end in a consonant.

-ta wiadomość takes the genitive because this is what happens when you negate a verb that takes an accusative object.

(The e in jabłek is an epenthesis that only occurs when feminine or neuter nouns that end in consonant clusters take the genitive plural, to avoid strings of consonants: okno - dużo okien, skrzydło - dużo skrzydeł, Polka - dużo Polek).

-The noun rok is one of the few Polish words that have fossilised dual forms with the numbers 2-3-4. Its singular and plural forms are derived from different roots. In Russian and Serbo-Croatian, these sorts of forms for 2-3-4 that are similar to the genitive singular occur in all nouns.

I feel like I had learned all 4 of these rules at some point in the past, but my skills are that rusty. Thanks anyways.
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Saim » 2016-06-25, 22:35

I feel like I had learned all 4 of these rules at some point in the past, but my skills are that rusty. Thanks anyways.


Spoko, zdarza się. Zawsze dobrze zrobić powtórkę. :wink:

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Michael » 2016-06-27, 23:10

Week 24 Update

Albanian (sq) I have to say, I'm really enjoying learning Albanian! It's quite a well-balanced language with a lexicon of mostly native stock, but with up to 40% of its loanwords coming from Latin/Italian, from various times in history, Slavic, and <5% Turkish, from the Ottoman conquest of the Albanians, e.g. dyqan "store", beqar/e "single", i.e. not married, takim "meeting", dodaqi "lip(s)", çadër "umbrella", sheqer "sugar", xhami "mosque", shah "chess", etc.

I'm currently on Mësimi 2/18, page 25/303, going over names of countries and their respective nationalities and languages, along with cardinal numbers 13 to 90.
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: TAC 2016 - Mike (Azeri, Spanish)

Postby Irusia » 2016-06-28, 17:28

voron wrote:Your last set should say American, not European. In most of Europe, the week begins with Monday.

Russian and other Slavic languages numerate their days of the week too:

Monday - понедельник - "after the week"
Tuesday - вторник - "second"
Wednesday - среда - "middle"
Thursday - четверг - "fourth"
Friday - пятница - "fifth"
Saturday - суббота - "Sabbath"
Sunday - воскресение - "resurrection"

I find çerşembe axşamı awkward. How do
they say "Tuesday evening" I wonder?


Actually, "неделя" is from "не делать" (not to do), and means "Sunday" in other Slavic languages such as Ukrainian or Polish. And "понеделник" is "the day after Sunday".
Здайся на Господа у твоїх справах, і задуми твої здійсняться. (Приповідки 16, 3)

Ja učim: (hr) hrvatski
Počela sam učiti: 18.09.2017
Cilj: B2 do nove godine

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Michael » 2016-07-11, 23:23

Week 26 Update

Albanian (sq) I've been making progress in the initial chapters of Discovering Albanian 1. I'm now at the end of Mësimi 4/18, "Çfarë profesioni keni?" (What is your profession?), p. 58/303, inputting the vocabulary for the last dialogue of that lesson into Anki, before I answer the exercises, concluding this lesson and enabling me to move onto Mësimi 5, "Në shtëpi" (At home).

I spoke very basic, conversational Albanian today for the first time! The lady that I spoke to this morning told me that do të shkojë në Shqipëri në dy javë me pushime (she will be going to Albania in two weeks on vacation/holiday), and that she will bring me back a book of hers on Albanian history! :D
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby voron » 2016-07-12, 7:43

That's very cool! Keep up the good work Michael.

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Michael » 2016-07-23, 19:46

Week 27 Update

Albanian (sq) I've been making swift beginner's progress with Albanian! :D Since I've completed the first of three përsëritje (reviews), spaced out every sixth lesson, it's time for an Anki head count. Out of a total of 597 cards as of the completion of this first review, there are 289 nouns, 43 verbs, 62 adjectives, 78 adverbs, 6 prepositions and 55 phrases. I'm now at p.99/303, in the middle of Mësimi 7/18, "Çfarë ka sonte në televizor? (What's on TV tonight?)".

Thus far, I've learnt how to count from 0 to +1000, masculine and feminine adjectives in the singular, weather expressions, the days of the week and their corresponding adverbs (e.g. e hënë "Monday", with nom. --> të hënën "on Monday", with acc.), the seasons and months of the year, how to conjugate Class 1 and 2 verbs in the present indicative (along with some other verbs that seem irregular to me, but could belong to one of the other 5 classes for all I know), and some irregular verbs like jap "to give", dua "to want", and them "to say". I'm also learning how to form definite versus indefinite nouns, in both the singular and plural. Some core Albanian nouns often have slightly irregular indefinite plurals, but the definite plural is very easy to form—just attach -t to the indefinite plural if it ends in an unstressed vowel, -të if it ends in a consonant or stressed vowel, or -it if it ends in the irregular -ër/-ar masculine plural suffix.

I've been listening to a lot of Albanian songs, as well as some old Arvanitic songs, which, together with my comprehensive, modern textbook, has motivated me to get through these first several units. I'd like to share a beautiful song:

Vëllai im i dashur ("My dear brother")
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERkWSuR-hBc
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Re: Mike's personal language blog for 2016

Postby Michael » 2016-09-06, 18:34

Despite having been inactive for the last 10 weeks, here's…

Week 38 Update

[flag=]pt-br[/flag] Para refrescar a minha memória do português, planejo ler A intimação, uma tradução brasileira do romance norte-americano The Summons, escrito por John Grisham. Ao terminar cada capítulo, vou listar aqui todas as novas palavras que terei encontrado nele e as respetivas traduções para o inglês, e depois transferi-las em um baralho de Anki a fim de não as esquecer.

Uma breve descrição do enredo do romance, do folheto de frente:
Um autêntico John Grisham: assim é A intimação, o novo romance de um dos mais lidos autores norte-americanos. Desta vez, um grande mistério conduz a história de Ray Atlee, um advogado da Virgínia que atende a uma solicitação do juiz Reuben, seu pai.
O velho juiz está doente e sabe que o fim se aproxima. Durante quarenta anos ele exerceu um razoável poder político na pequena cidade de Clanton, no Mississípi, mas depois de perder uma eleição para um candidato mais jovem passou a experimentar o ostracismo. De Maple Run, a mansão decadente onde vive, ele convoca os dois filhos para uma reunião: “Por favor, façam seus planos para comparecer ao meu escritório no domingo, 7 de maio, às cinco horas da tarde, a fim de discutirmos sobre a administração dos meus bens.”
Forrest, o filho mais novo, tem 36 anos e ostenta o título de ovelha negra da família. Usou todo tipo de droga e mora no Memphis. Ray chega primeiro a Maple Run e encontra o pai morto no sofá, ao lado de um pacote de morfina. Sobre a escrivaninha, um testamento o coloca como inventariante na divisão dos parcos bens. Mas uma porta aberta do armário revela ao advogado uma fortuna em espécie, acondicionada em caixas de papel de carta. Ele esconde o achado de todos, inclusive do irmão, e tenta descobrir a origem do dinheiro, pois o pai ganhava apenas 52 mil dólares por ano de pensão, e doava quase tudo à caridade.
O estranho legado coloca Ray em contato com um chantagista e o envolve numa trama de desfecho surpreendente, a exemplo das primeiras obras de Grisham, como Tempo de matar e O dossiê Pelicano.

Mesmo nestes parágrafos iniciais aprendi algumas novas palavras(!):
a intimação subpoena, summons
parco economical, frugal
o/a chantagista blackmailer
a trama plot, scheme, conspiracy
o desfecho outcome, conclusion

[flag=]in[/flag] Most of you reading this have most likely already read my latest posts on the Wanderlust Support Group concerning Tamil, so no further elaboration on that.
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

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Michael
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TAC 2016 - Mike - Portuguese, Albanian, others on the side

Postby Michael » 2016-09-28, 19:44

Os espaços entre cada grupo de palavras demarcam fronteira de página. Decidi separar as palavras assim para elas aparecerem mais limpas aos olhos de quem lê o meu tópico, em vez de haver um listão que pareça em desordem. :)

Novas palavras, Capítulo 1
a tampa lid, top, cover
corrediço/a sliding, gliding
a fatura invoice, bill
a peroração grand finale of a speech, eloquent concluding statements
o tribunal court of law

o cachimbo tobacco pipe
inveterado/a chain smoker
aposentar to retire (trans.)
despejar to evict
empilhar to pile, stack
o sagrão lobby

dependurar to hang, suspend
vitalício/a for life (adj.), lifelong
grudado/a glued, stuck, pasted together
a fita typewriter cartridge
desdobrar to unfold
o suprimento supply

o rabisco scribble, chicken scratch (i.e. unintelligible or poor handwriting)
encolhido/a shrunken
perante prep. in the presence of, before
o prazo period of time, deadline
a folga break, pause

o assoalho wooden floor
empenado/a warped
a criadagem maids' quarters
o bordo maple
o buraco hole
ladear to line [up], flank, skirt

o toco stub, cigarette butt
apodrecido/a rotten, musty
o ancinho rake
o galho branch, twig, limb (syn. of a rama)
minguar to wane, decline in importance or relevance
a bolha bubble, blister
estourar to burst, shatter

a mesada allowance
o terno suit, dress suit
aleijado/a crippled
a muleta crutch
a arrecadação collection, proceeds (charitable earnings)
catar to gather (syn. of apanhar)
o espólio assets, estate, property or goods of a deceased person

há muitos esquecidos from times passed
puído/a frayed, ragged (of fabric)
amortecido/a deadened, diminished; weakened
ambulante traveling (i.e. nomadic), ambulatory
a fileira row, rank, tier
o freguês regular customer
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”

User avatar
Michael
Posts: 6958
Joined: 2009-07-21, 3:07
Real Name: Mike
Gender: male
Location: L'Aquila, Abruzzo
Country: IT Italy (Italia)
Contact:

Re: TAC 2016 - Mike - Portuguese, Albanian, Persian

Postby Michael » 2016-10-29, 2:03

Este capítulo foi bem chato. O protagonista passou a maioria do tempo descrevendo ou voando em aviões. O momento mais suspensivo foi na pista de táxi quando viu no espelho esquerdo que, de coincidência, lhe estava acercando o avião do namorado da ex-mulher com ela e os dois novos filhos deles abordo. Não sei se estava com ciúme ou o quê?

Sendo assim o capítulo, não encontrei muitas palavras que já não soubesse.

Novas palavras, Capítulo 2
o sopé foot of a mountain, hillside
à medida que conj. as, while

babar to drool, slobber

a decolagem take-off
decolar to take off
sacudir to shake, jolt

o berro shriek, holler, yell

o enfarte tissue death, necrosis
o placar score, placard
o tijolo brick

afastar to avert, avoid
a pista track
o farol lighthouse, beacon

de grife designer (adj.) (syn. of the more common de moda)
achatado/a flattened, crushed
atarracado/a stubby, thick-set
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) Old English (en_old) A1
“Iċ eom māra þonne þes middanġeard; lǣssa þonne håndwyrm; leohtre þonne mōna; swiftre þonne sunne.”


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