Jam

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Saaropean
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Jam

Postby Saaropean » 2005-06-28, 13:10

Something you can make out of berries. :D


English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

French: confiture

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Re: Jam

Postby Liisi » 2005-06-28, 13:18

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

French: confiture

Finnish: hillo
I appreciate corrections to my mistakes in any language.

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Postby kibo » 2005-06-28, 13:19

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

French: confiture
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada]
(there's some difference between them but I dont know what. :lol: I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)

Finnish: hillo
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Postby Luís » 2005-06-28, 13:25

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

French: confiture
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces] (there's also some differences between them, but just like Bugi, I wouldn't exactly know what :P - something related to thickness and quantity of fruit/sugar )
Spanish: mermelada, dulce


Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)

Finnish: hillo
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Postby Mantaz » 2005-06-28, 13:28

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

French: confiture
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)

Finnish: hillo

lu:ka

Postby lu:ka » 2005-06-28, 13:54

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

French: confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce


Lithuanian: uogienė

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)

Finnish: hillo

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Postby Maja » 2005-06-28, 14:24

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

French: confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce


Lithuanian: uogienė

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)

Finnish: hillo
Maja

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Postby Guillem » 2005-06-28, 16:05

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce


Lithuanian: uogienė

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)

Finnish: hillo

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Postby Nukalurk » 2005-06-28, 17:12

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)

Finnish: hillo

Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo

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Postby 勺园之鬼 » 2005-06-28, 18:40

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: marmelade, confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Occitan: mermelada, confidura, confimenta
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)


Finnish: hillo


Chinese: 果酱 (果醬) [guǒjiàng]


Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo
四海为家

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Postby Gormur » 2005-06-28, 18:41

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Norwegian: syltetøy
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)

Finnish: hillo

Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo

Inuktitut: jaama (N Baffin), jaamak/jilik (Labrador), marmilaaji (W Greenland), mamalaajaq (E Greenland) = butter/jam-spread

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Postby 勺园之鬼 » 2005-06-28, 18:51

Gormur, be careful, it's the second time you ignore my posts... :twisted:


English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Norwegian: syltetøy
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: marmelade, confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Occitan: mermelada, confidura, confimenta
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)


Finnish: hillo


Chinese: 果酱 (果醬) [guǒjiàng]


Inuktitut: jaama (N Baffin), jaamak/jilik (Labrador), marmilaaji (W Greenland), mamalaajaq (E Greenland) = butter/jam-spread


Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo
四海为家

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Gormur
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Postby Gormur » 2005-06-28, 19:17

[quote="JunMing"]Gormur, be careful, it's the second time you ignore my posts... :twisted:

haha. I posted at the same time. Sorry about that. :wink:

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Postby wsz » 2005-06-28, 20:07

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Norwegian: syltetøy
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: marmelade, confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Occitan: mermelada, confidura, confimenta
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Polish: dżem, konfitury (=dżemy, plural of 'dżem'), marmolada (=dżem śliwkowy 'plum jam')
Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)

Finnish: hillo

Chinese: 果酱 (果醬) [guǒjiàng]

Inuktitut: jaama (N Baffin), jaamak/jilik (Labrador), marmilaaji (W Greenland), mamalaajaq (E Greenland) = butter/jam-spread

Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo
Last edited by wsz on 2005-06-28, 20:15, edited 2 times in total.

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Postby CoBB » 2005-06-28, 20:10

English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Norwegian: syltetøy
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: marmelade, confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Occitan: mermelada, confidura, confimenta
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Polish: dżem, konfitury (=dżemy, plural of 'dżem'), marmolada (=dżem śliwkowy 'plum jam')
Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)

Finnish: hillo
Hungarian: lekvár ('dzsem' is also widely understood, but much less used)

Chinese: 果酱 (果醬) [guǒjiàng]

Inuktitut: jaama (N Baffin), jaamak/jilik (Labrador), marmilaaji (W Greenland), mamalaajaq (E Greenland) = butter/jam-spread

Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo
Tanulni, tanulni, tanulni!

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Postby Psi-Lord » 2005-06-28, 20:22

Worth pointing that in Portuguese, just as 'marmelada' is made of quinces ('marmelos'), you can have 'goiabada' (made of guavas = 'goiabas'), 'bananada' (made of bananas), 'abacatada' (made of avocados 'abacates'), 'pessegada' (made of peaches = 'pêssegos'), 'cocada' (made of coconuts = 'cocos') etc. When English borrowed 'marmelada', it borrowed it as a generic term, though.

As for the differences, Houaiss defines 'compota' as being made with whole fruits or with large pieces of fruits, usually cooked with a lot of sugar; 'geléia' as pasty, thick, uniform, also made of fruit cooked in sugar; and 'doce' as a more generic name for anything that takes sugar (although I can't help thinking specifically of 'doce-de-coco', made of coconuts, and 'doce-de-abóbora', made of pumpkins, gourds or squashes).
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Postby dorenda » 2005-06-29, 15:22

Dutch: jam
English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Norwegian: syltetøy
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: marmelade, confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Occitan: mermelada, confidura, confimenta
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Polish: dżem, konfitury (=dżemy, plural of 'dżem'), marmolada (=dżem śliwkowy 'plum jam')
Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)
Ukrainian: варення, джем [varennja, dzhem]

Scots-Gaelic: silidh

Finnish: hillo
Hungarian: lekvár ('dzsem' is also widely understood, but much less used)

Chinese: 果酱 (果醬) [guǒjiàng]

Inuktitut: jaama (N Baffin), jaamak/jilik (Labrador), marmilaaji (W Greenland), mamalaajaq (E Greenland) = butter/jam-spread

Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo

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Postby Rex » 2005-06-29, 19:55

Dutch: jam
English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Norwegian: syltetøy
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: marmelade, confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Occitan: mermelada, confidura, confimenta
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Polish: dżem, konfitury (=dżemy, plural of 'dżem'), marmolada (=dżem śliwkowy 'plum jam')
Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)
Ukrainian: варення, джем [varennja, dzhem]

Scots-Gaelic: silidh

Finnish: hillo
Hungarian: lekvár ('dzsem' is also widely understood, but much less used)

Turkish: Reçel

Chinese: 果酱 (果醬) [guǒjiàng]

Inuktitut: jaama (N Baffin), jaamak/jilik (Labrador), marmilaaji (W Greenland), mamalaajaq (E Greenland) = butter/jam-spread

Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo[/quote]

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Postby paruha » 2005-06-29, 20:18

Dutch: jam
English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Norwegian: syltetøy
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: marmelade, confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Occitan: mermelada, confidura, confimenta
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Bulgarian: сладко, конфитюр, мармалад
Polish: dżem, konfitury (=dżemy, plural of 'dżem'), marmolada (=dżem śliwkowy 'plum jam')
Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)
Ukrainian: варення, джем [varennja, dzhem]

Scots-Gaelic: silidh

Finnish: hillo
Hungarian: lekvár ('dzsem' is also widely understood, but much less used)

Turkish: Reçel

Chinese: 果酱 (果醬) [guǒjiàng]

Inuktitut: jaama (N Baffin), jaamak/jilik (Labrador), marmilaaji (W Greenland), mamalaajaq (E Greenland) = butter/jam-spread

Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo
Защо да харчим пари, които нямаме, за да купим неща, които не са ни нужни, така че да впечатлим хора, които не харесваме?

I don't even remember what standard deviation is.
BezierCurve: It's some important part of sadistics, I believe.

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Re:

Postby Gormur » 2020-06-10, 0:49

Dutch: jam
English: jam
German: Marmelade, officially Konfitüre for most fruits and berries
Icelandic: sulta
Luxembourgish: Gebeess
Norwegian: syltetøy
Rhine Franconian (Saarbrücken dialect): Sißschmier ("sweet spread"), separate words exists for some kinds of jam

Catalan: melmelada, confitura
French: marmelade, confiture
Italian: marmellata, confettura (I think the difference is that the latter contains fruit pieces)
Occitan: mermelada, confidura, confimenta
Portuguese: geleia, compota, doce, marmelada [only if made out of quinces]
Spanish: mermelada, dulce

Lithuanian: uogienė

Bulgarian: сладко, конфитюр, мармалад
Polish: dżem, konfitury (=dżemy, plural of 'dżem'), marmolada (=dżem śliwkowy 'plum jam')
Serbian: џем, пекмез, мармелада [džem, pekmez, marmelada] (there's some difference between them but I dont know what. I think џем is thicker and more dense than пекмез)
Slovenian: marmelada, džem (the difference is that there are pieces of fruit in džem)
Ukrainian: варення, джем [varennja, dzhem]

Scots-Gaelic: silidh

Finnish: hillo
Hungarian: lekvár ('dzsem' is also widely understood, but much less used)

Turkish: Reçel

Chinese: 果酱 (果醬) [guǒjiàng]

Inuktitut: jaama (N Baffin), jaamak/jilik (Labrador), marmilaaji (W Greenland), mamalaajaq (E Greenland) = butter/jam-spread

Esperanto: marmelado, konfitaĵo
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma


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